Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Something is funny

Last response: in Windows 95/98/ME
Share
April 2, 2002 12:54:33 AM

I have formatted my Hard disk lately so as to reinstall Win98SE. First thing I do is to copy the cab files to the HDD and than install the OS from my Hard disk. The installation starts itself without problems, but I find my serial number already typed in its place. When I click O.K., the installation does not give me the choice to install different Windows components. I did format the hard disk from a Win98SE startup diskette. Can anybody have an explanation? And how can I really format the HDD?

More about : funny

April 2, 2002 1:32:41 AM

You select the components well before the product key. If the key is already there, that could mean that you have a unattended install *INI* file written in the WIN98 dir

Blame the newbies not the technology
April 2, 2002 1:42:02 AM

So the problem is an .ini file in my win'98 cab files? How can I remove it? Thanks for your reply.
Related resources
April 2, 2002 1:46:15 AM

It can only be there if it is for multiple licensing. It is 98 so I doubt it. Is it a burnt cd?

Blame the newbies not the technology
April 2, 2002 1:59:08 AM

Well then somebody has already made an unintended install ini file. Don't worry about it. You can add/remove options after the install, which is easier.

Blame the newbies not the technology
April 2, 2002 7:52:40 PM

Thanks very much for your comments. I was really thinking that I am not formatting the HDD correctly.
One more question. Is there an "easy" way of refreshing the OS without formatting the HDD, and without registry errors?
Thanks! Ciao
April 2, 2002 9:55:29 PM

Quote:
Is there an "easy" way of refreshing the OS without formatting the HDD

Yes there is. Just delete or rename win.com from a dos prompt and run setup. Windows 98 looks for win.com to tell wether or not windows is currently installed. Although you will have to reinstall directx. If you have 98se, you will be back to directx 6.1

Blame the newbies not the technology
April 2, 2002 10:10:22 PM

As you should already guessed by now, I am no wiz! But, I am asking this question since I have to do it "frequently" due to corrupted files, explorer errors, illegal operations, icons etc.. When reinstalling win 98SE on the old one, normally, the problem does not correct itself. What can be done?
April 3, 2002 4:25:30 PM

Back up files and format. If problems continue, look at ram, cooling, mobo, and cache (disable L1,L2, if p54c or 55c or any other socket or super 7 proc L3 offdie cache).

Blame the newbies not the technology
April 3, 2002 6:15:38 PM

It sounds like your disc was burned from a pre-existing install of Win98... this is usually done with restore discs supplied from the large OEMs.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
April 3, 2002 11:00:13 PM

The frequent errors occuring in my system are normally due to installing/uninstalling of software. Infact, when Win98SE is installed, no problems occurs for at least 1/2 months. Buy that time loads of software/downloads etc occupies the hdd. I know that the best way to clear the system from rubbish is the format of the hdd, but who knows, maybe somebody out there knows else!
April 4, 2002 4:39:11 AM

I'd say the best way to do this, (instead of periodically formatting the drive and completely reinstalling the operating system), is to create a compressed image of the partition while the OS is still in a pristine condition, complete with all the updates, drivers, user preferences, etc.

Afterwards, when you deem it is time for a format/reinstallation, all you'd have to do is restore the image on the partition. It would be quick, painless, and you wouldn't have to use the operating system installation CD again. The image would put you right back where you started. That would save you a lot of time and trouble.

<A HREF="http://www.powerquest.com/driveimage/" target="_new">Drive Image 5.0</A> from PowerQuest is an excellent investment, especially for someone who likes to experiment with different programs, and is constantly installing/deleting programs and files.

Toejam31

<font color=red>My Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=6847" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Tantalizing Tantric Toy</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
____________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Procrastination on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part."</font color=purple>
April 4, 2002 7:29:24 PM

Thats is a good idea! When you want to repristine the system, would it have to be from dos or windows? Norton Gost can do the trick? Does the image replace the whole system or just replaces similar files? These are my questions, but I think the best think is to try it personally. Thanks for the idea, pal.
April 4, 2002 8:30:23 PM

An image is like a compressed photograph of all the files on a partition. Every file, folder, and user setting ... everything.

Let's say you imaged the partition that contained Win98, when everything was perfect. After a month or so, when you would normally format and reinstall Windows, you would instead simply change the boot order in the BIOS to CD-ROM, and boot with the image. Then you would decide where to place the image, and it would format the chosen partition as it installed itself. All the old files would be gone, and everything would be perfect again. It would take less than an hour.

Newer programs like this can create images that only contain the files on the partition, without the free space. That makes the image much smaller. You could easily place the entire image on one or two CDs.

The imaging program creates a virtual floppy disk, which runs in a proprietary version of DOS. That virtual floppy can be edited by the user.

The bootable virtual floppy disk will be part of the image. The image can be stored on a separate partition on the hard drive, and/or on CD-R disks. This gives you two different ways to restore a partition.

An image can be created that contains the contents of <i>any</i> partition, not just the one that contains the operating system ... so it is also an excellent way to backup your personal files. The image can be spanned into different sizes, and the contents can be verified during the creation process (and this includes the file system) so that there will be no errors.

Norton Ghost and Drive Image are the two most popular programs of this kind.

Toejam31

<font color=red>My Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=6847" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Tantalizing Tantric Toy</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
____________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Procrastination on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part."</font color=purple>
April 4, 2002 9:08:33 PM

Thanks for the info
!