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Why should I move Sys Reserved to my SSD

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  • Configuration
  • SSD
  • Hard Drives
  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 7
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May 31, 2012 7:37:11 PM

When I installed Windows 7 Ultimate onto my SSD it automadically put a System Reserved Partition (SRP) on my HDD. I have been told (and I've read) that SRP should be put onto my SSD. Are there any good reasons for doing that?

How can SRP be moved to my SSD without havings problems? Do I have to make any changes to the windows registry, bios, and/or add pointers to my HDD, in my case it's D:/? Where can I find detailed instructions to do this?
I would prefer not to have to add any programs to do it.

I want to optomize my SSD after this is done.

Thanks

More about : move sys reserved ssd

a b $ Windows 7
June 4, 2012 9:08:33 AM

papagym said:
When I installed Windows 7 Ultimate onto my SSD it automadically put a System Reserved Partition (SRP) on my HDD. I have been told (and I've read) that SRP should be put onto my SSD. Are there any good reasons for doing that?

How can SRP be moved to my SSD without havings problems? Do I have to make any changes to the windows registry, bios, and/or add pointers to my HDD, in my case it's D:/? Where can I find detailed instructions to do this?
I would prefer not to have to add any programs to do it.

I want to optomize my SSD after this is done.

Thanks

When created, the SRP becomes the “system” partition which contains the boot manager instead of allowing the boot manager to reside on the boot volume (the volume where the Windows operating system is installed). The SRP will also hold the essential information for Microsoft’s BitLocker Drive Encryption which is required in order to decrypt data on the encrypted windows volume(s) after recovery.
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June 5, 2012 6:40:07 PM

ksiemb said:
When created, the SRP becomes the “system” partition which contains the boot manager instead of allowing the boot manager to reside on the boot volume (the volume where the Windows operating system is installed). The SRP will also hold the essential information for Microsoft’s BitLocker Drive Encryption which is required in order to decrypt data on the encrypted windows volume(s) after recovery.


Thank you and I do appreciate your reply. But you have not told me anything I didn't already know. I'm aware of the letters SRP stand for System Reserved Partition and that the boot manager and BitLocker reside in that partition (volume).

I'm also aware that there is some kind of pointer or link in SRP that points to the boot partition to do a startup.

My systems boot partition is on C which is a SSD by the way.
And SRP is on my D which is a HDD.

Some people are basically telling me that I should create a new partition on C/ then move SRP to it then delete the SRP Partition from D:.

So basically my question is. Is there any an advantage to do that?

Intel wants me to do a clean install to fix a problem with the USB 3.0 driver, so I thought I'd change this at the same time of needed.
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a c 238 $ Windows 7
June 5, 2012 6:49:00 PM

If your HDD dies, you won't be able to boot. If it's on your SSD and you make regular backups/images, you can just backup the SSD and be done.
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June 5, 2012 8:09:48 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
If your HDD dies, you won't be able to boot. If it's on your SSD and you make regular backups/images, you can just backup the SSD and be done.


Thanks Hawkeye that does makes some sense. So what you are saying is put the SRP on the SSD. Then make a third partition on the SSD to store the restore points and backups. (Just in case the HDD Fails)

I don't want to beat this to death but unless you have a large SSD it is going to fill up pretty fast. (What with OS,Programs, Data, SRP, and Backups)
(SSD can fail too)

More and more I'm hearing people say just put the OS on a SSD
Move Users files, Programs and their files to a HDD and call the partition data.
Make another partition and call it backup.

Of course you can always Raid this!

So what is a dummy like me to do when I have 128MB SSD and 2ea ITB HDD's and Intel says I need to clean install?
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a c 238 $ Windows 7
June 5, 2012 8:17:59 PM

Make sure the SSD is the only drive installed when installing the OS. This will guarantee everything (boot loader and OS) is on one drive. Attach the remaing drives after the OS is installed. without the boot loader, the OS won't run.
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June 6, 2012 10:57:26 PM

Hawkeye I understand what you are saying. The SSD be should be the only drive connected to the PC when installing the OS. (this in fact would cause SPR to be installed on the SSD like I said above) Than connect additional drives after that.

Your choice of wording "without the boot loader, the OS won't run" is a bit confusing.
To use your words the "boot loader" is actually part of SRP, isn't that true?

SRP does more than just help one to boot up but I don't think we need to go any further into that here. Other than to say SRP can not be deleted.

Thread completed.
Thanks




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June 7, 2012 1:37:57 PM

papagym said:
When I installed Windows 7 Ultimate onto my SSD ....
You should have DISCONNECTED all HDDs from the system.
That way, Windows setup will install only on SSD. After the setup is done, connect your drives back again. This way, windows setup does not make love to your other drives (mildly put).
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June 8, 2012 11:18:43 PM

OK Guys,

This morning I disconnected both (data & power cables) from both of my HDD's to see if I could even boot from my SSD (Disk 0).

My system booted just fine with no problem.

I've made a lot of repairs and re-imaged the SSD a few times so something I did made the SSD boot sector work. The SR partition is still on Disk 1.
I also have a D:/Backup partition on this Disk.

I have a problem with a Renesas Electronics 3.0 USB driver. Intel wants me to do a clean install, to fix it. It's Event Viewer Errror ID 56 which says: Driver PCI returned an invalid ID for child device (FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF00)
My Crucial M4 128GB SSD needs to have a couple of Firmware upgrades.

I've read that it's real hard to "copy or remove" a SR partition and I'm not sure of how to do this. Can you help? If I can wipe (Disk 1) I can fix a lot of things at the samee time

If I have to do a clean install I would wipe the SSD clean. Is that right?
Should Firmware be revised before or after an install?

I have one more problem, my Install disk has cracks in it and MS is sending a new one so I don't know if my register key number will work.

Sometime I wonder.....should I have stayed with XP Pro

I've got a lot of 2006 CAD programs on an IDE Drive and I'm getting older....should I clone that drive to a new SATA and dual boot with XP Pro...

Computers could be fun.............Thanks





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June 9, 2012 8:45:17 AM

Some firmwares will wipe a SSD some won´t - and the firm normally say if the firmware upgrade will wipe the drive - so basicly do the firmware upgrade befor installing the OS
Du you have anything that needs the USB 3.0 - or else disable it...
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June 9, 2012 2:30:57 PM

Thank correon for the firmware info.

I did the firmware upgrade on Crucial CT128M4SSD2 with no problems to OS.
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