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hvac for iso booth (need advice)

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Anonymous
December 27, 2004 5:30:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

hello everyone,

i'm building an iso-booth. i could use some suggestions on where to
get parts for a ventilation system.

i have the basic idea: you force air in with a fan that goes through a
tube with sound absorption in it. the air then goes in a grill in the
booth (near the bottom) then there is a passive air vent near the
ceiling. the air goes out this second vent passively to equalize the
air pressure and to allow excess heat to escape.

any idea on parts for the ducts, vents and fan?

(i don't need temperature control since it's a sub-room within a
climate-controlled room, and it's only for sporadic use).

More about : hvac iso booth advice

Anonymous
December 27, 2004 9:00:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

genericaudioperson@hotmail.com wrote:
> hello everyone,
>
> i'm building an iso-booth. i could use some suggestions on where to
> get parts for a ventilation system.
>
> i have the basic idea: you force air in with a fan that goes through
a
> tube with sound absorption in it. the air then goes in a grill in
the
> booth (near the bottom) then there is a passive air vent near the
> ceiling. the air goes out this second vent passively to equalize the
> air pressure and to allow excess heat to escape.
>
> any idea on parts for the ducts, vents and fan?
>
> (i don't need temperature control since it's a sub-room within a
> climate-controlled room, and it's only for sporadic use).


I though the concept of studio ventilation was "move a lot of air
slowly", therefore making less noise, but still having the same air
flow rate.

My friends did their studio with a giant peice of duct work on the
roof, that is basically a hugh car muffler, with sound absorbtion
material on the inside, after the air output of the HVAC. They are also
running seperate HVAC for the control room, and the studio floor.
Talk to a mechanical supplier near where you are.
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 10:47:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks for the insights, Jonny. I'll check into that stuff.

i have Sonex foam. i plan to use that on the inside walls. i'm
guessing that would meet air-duct requirements.
Related resources
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 5:50:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Right now I'm installing giant sound attenuators for a local HVAC
company....I'm sure you can buy ones that will fit your size, but yes, I
would imagine the best idea is to move lots of air slowly. On any fans you
get, you'll want to obviously have the highest CFM/Sones ratio, with higher
CFM and lower Sones...air king makes a 100 CFM 3.5 sones bathroom fan for
about $30 which is a great deal if you're on a budget....you might want to
check www.mcmastercarr.com for more professional stuff. Otherwise I would
just line the inside of some ductwork with foam and cover it with some kind
of mesh....if you can manage a few 90 degree turns in the ducting all the
better, air won't have a problem flowing around a corner, sound
will.....good luck!

--

Jonny Durango

"Patrick was a saint. I ain't."

http://www.jdurango.com



<genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1104186643.472742.249400@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> hello everyone,
>
> i'm building an iso-booth. i could use some suggestions on where to
> get parts for a ventilation system.
>
> i have the basic idea: you force air in with a fan that goes through a
> tube with sound absorption in it. the air then goes in a grill in the
> booth (near the bottom) then there is a passive air vent near the
> ceiling. the air goes out this second vent passively to equalize the
> air pressure and to allow excess heat to escape.
>
> any idea on parts for the ducts, vents and fan?
>
> (i don't need temperature control since it's a sub-room within a
> climate-controlled room, and it's only for sporadic use).
>
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 5:50:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Jonny Durango" <jonnybush_from_officedurango1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:LR3Ad.575284$wV.257294@attbi_s54...
> Right now I'm installing giant sound attenuators for a local HVAC
> company....I'm sure you can buy ones that will fit your size, but yes, I
> would imagine the best idea is to move lots of air slowly. On any fans you
> get, you'll want to obviously have the highest CFM/Sones ratio, with
higher
> CFM and lower Sones...air king makes a 100 CFM 3.5 sones bathroom fan for
> about $30 which is a great deal if you're on a budget....you might want to
> check www.mcmastercarr.com for more professional stuff. Otherwise I would
> just line the inside of some ductwork with foam and cover it with some
kind
> of mesh....if you can manage a few 90 degree turns in the ducting all the
> better, air won't have a problem flowing around a corner, sound
> will.....good luck!
>
> --
>
> Jonny Durango
>

I'm just guessing but it seems that any foam that you might put in an air
duct would have to meet certain requirements ( depending on local building
codes of course ). I'd think you would want foam that wouldn't catch on
fire or give off toxic fumes and probably avoid stuff that would absorb
moisture and not dry out and turn to dust etc.

John L Rice
Drummer@ImJohn.com
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 6:34:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

again, check out www.mcmastercarr.com for all different types of
foam.....most have very high temperature tolerances, including the cheap
polyurethane stuff....but they even stock specialized stuff like
anti-static fire-retardant foam....another thought that came to mind, for
damping (ie. vibration reduction) check out their polymastic meric ....I've
used it in custom studio monitors (LS3/5A's) with great results...it is the
same stuff that sells for ten times as much at auto-body stores.

--

Jonny Durango

"Patrick was a saint. I ain't."

http://www.jdurango.com



"John L Rice" <Drummer@ImJohn.com> wrote in message
news:10t1k4lfc8p2de2@corp.supernews.com...
>
> "Jonny Durango" <jonnybush_from_officedurango1@comcast.net> wrote in
message
> news:LR3Ad.575284$wV.257294@attbi_s54...
> > Right now I'm installing giant sound attenuators for a local HVAC
> > company....I'm sure you can buy ones that will fit your size, but yes, I
> > would imagine the best idea is to move lots of air slowly. On any fans
you
> > get, you'll want to obviously have the highest CFM/Sones ratio, with
> higher
> > CFM and lower Sones...air king makes a 100 CFM 3.5 sones bathroom fan
for
> > about $30 which is a great deal if you're on a budget....you might want
to
> > check www.mcmastercarr.com for more professional stuff. Otherwise I
would
> > just line the inside of some ductwork with foam and cover it with some
> kind
> > of mesh....if you can manage a few 90 degree turns in the ducting all
the
> > better, air won't have a problem flowing around a corner, sound
> > will.....good luck!
> >
> > --
> >
> > Jonny Durango
> >
>
> I'm just guessing but it seems that any foam that you might put in an air
> duct would have to meet certain requirements ( depending on local building
> codes of course ). I'd think you would want foam that wouldn't catch on
> fire or give off toxic fumes and probably avoid stuff that would absorb
> moisture and not dry out and turn to dust etc.
>
> John L Rice
> Drummer@ImJohn.com
>
>
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 6:34:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks Johnny. I did take a quick look but I didn't spend enough time to
find the right pages. ( but I will now ;-)

John L Rice
Drummer@ImJohn.com

"Jonny Durango" <jonnybush_from_officedurango1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:4v4Ad.714055$mD.283976@attbi_s02...
> again, check out www.mcmastercarr.com for all different types of
> foam.....most have very high temperature tolerances, including the cheap
> polyurethane stuff....but they even stock specialized stuff like
> anti-static fire-retardant foam....another thought that came to mind, for
> damping (ie. vibration reduction) check out their polymastic meric
.....I've
> used it in custom studio monitors (LS3/5A's) with great results...it is
the
> same stuff that sells for ten times as much at auto-body stores.
>
> --
>
> Jonny Durango
>
> "Patrick was a saint. I ain't."
>
> http://www.jdurango.com
>
>
>
> "John L Rice" <Drummer@ImJohn.com> wrote in message
> news:10t1k4lfc8p2de2@corp.supernews.com...
> >
> > "Jonny Durango" <jonnybush_from_officedurango1@comcast.net> wrote in
> message
> > news:LR3Ad.575284$wV.257294@attbi_s54...
> > > Right now I'm installing giant sound attenuators for a local HVAC
> > > company....I'm sure you can buy ones that will fit your size, but yes,
I
> > > would imagine the best idea is to move lots of air slowly. On any fans
> you
> > > get, you'll want to obviously have the highest CFM/Sones ratio, with
> > higher
> > > CFM and lower Sones...air king makes a 100 CFM 3.5 sones bathroom fan
> for
> > > about $30 which is a great deal if you're on a budget....you might
want
> to
> > > check www.mcmastercarr.com for more professional stuff. Otherwise I
> would
> > > just line the inside of some ductwork with foam and cover it with some
> > kind
> > > of mesh....if you can manage a few 90 degree turns in the ducting all
> the
> > > better, air won't have a problem flowing around a corner, sound
> > > will.....good luck!
> > >
> > > --
> > >
> > > Jonny Durango
> > >
> >
> > I'm just guessing but it seems that any foam that you might put in an
air
> > duct would have to meet certain requirements ( depending on local
building
> > codes of course ). I'd think you would want foam that wouldn't catch on
> > fire or give off toxic fumes and probably avoid stuff that would absorb
> > moisture and not dry out and turn to dust etc.
> >
> > John L Rice
> > Drummer@ImJohn.com
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 10:25:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
>thanks for the insights, Jonny. I'll check into that stuff.
>
>i have Sonex foam. i plan to use that on the inside walls. i'm
>guessing that would meet air-duct requirements.
>
>

I wouldn't bet on that.

Personally, I'd use fuzzy duct for the plenems. It meets code and is relatively
(especially compared to Sonex) inexpensive.
>
>


Richard H. Kuschel
"I canna change the law of physics."-----Scotty
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 11:46:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I just asked my boss today who's worked in HVAC for 20 years......he said to
use flexible ducting so you can put curves in it....then line the inside
with a product called soundline ....also confirmed that you want to use big
slow fans to slowly push lots of air through large diffusers (vents)

--

Jonny Durango

"Patrick was a saint. I ain't."

http://www.jdurango.com



"Richard Kuschel" <rickpv8945@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20041228142507.21876.00002345@mb-m14.aol.com...
> >
> >thanks for the insights, Jonny. I'll check into that stuff.
> >
> >i have Sonex foam. i plan to use that on the inside walls. i'm
> >guessing that would meet air-duct requirements.
> >
> >
>
> I wouldn't bet on that.
>
> Personally, I'd use fuzzy duct for the plenems. It meets code and is
relatively
> (especially compared to Sonex) inexpensive.
> >
> >
>
>
> Richard H. Kuschel
> "I canna change the law of physics."-----Scotty
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 4:15:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jonny Durango wrote:

> Otherwise I would
> just line the inside of some ductwork with foam and cover it with some kind
> of mesh....if you can manage a few 90 degree turns in the ducting all the
> better, air won't have a problem flowing around a corner, sound
> will.....good luck!

You'll have much better "luck" if you just build a simple, properly
baffled plenum chamber, which doesn't require rocket surgery.

--
ha
!