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Mono for solo classical instrument!

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Anonymous
December 28, 2004 7:40:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Seems obvious to me that MONO is the way to record any solo classical
instrument, except perhaps pipe organ.
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 8:25:49 PM

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Laurence Payne wrote:
> On 28 Dec 2004 16:40:29 -0800, calcerise@hotmail.com wrote:
>
> >Seems obvious to me that MONO is the way to record any solo
classical
> >instrument, except perhaps pipe organ.
>
> Why?
> Do you record in a completely dead room?
But I don't play back in a completely dead room either...
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 10:49:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1104280829.058950.3810@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
<calcerise@hotmail.com> wrote:
>Seems obvious to me that MONO is the way to record any solo classical
>instrument, except perhaps pipe organ.

Even recording something like a piano or violin, you're really recording
the room and not the instrument. And the room _is_ in stereo. You want
to give a sense of the space that the instrument is in, not just the
instrument itself.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
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Anonymous
December 29, 2004 3:50:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I use stereo for solo guitar.

Bob

<calcerise@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1104280829.058950.3810@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Seems obvious to me that MONO is the way to record any solo classical
> instrument, except perhaps pipe organ.
>
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 3:56:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 28 Dec 2004 16:40:29 -0800, calcerise@hotmail.com wrote:

>Seems obvious to me that MONO is the way to record any solo classical
>instrument, except perhaps pipe organ.

Why?
Do you record in a completely dead room?

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 4:20:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<calcerise@hotmail.com> wrote in message ...
> Seems obvious to me that MONO is the way to record any solo classical
> instrument, except perhaps pipe organ.
>

Can you explain why you think this? IMO, I would hate to record mono, but
that is just me... We hear in stereo so we should record that way.

--Ben

--
Benjamin Maas
Fifth Circle Audio
Los Angeles, CA
http://www.fifthcircle.com

Please remove "Nospam" from address for replies
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 4:20:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I vote for stereo. Try this little experiment. Record in stereo as usual.
Put on your headphones. Then apply different treatments to each channel.
Apply reverb only to the left channel (cathedral). To the right channel
apply only short single delay echo. This treatment will now change your
sound feild and your position in it to being pushed back from your sound
source and slightly to the right of it. You will get the impression that you
are facing slightly away from the sound source to the left and that there is
a wall close to your right and you will definately hear the reverberations
of a large empty room to your left.
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 3:29:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It's difficult, and perhaps also senseless, to argue with anyone's
stated perception of what is obvious.

With many types of solo instrument (i.e. the kinds that are not very
wide), a high percentage of the public might well be unable to identify
a stereo recording versus a good mono recording, if both were played
back through a reasonably placed pair of loudspeakers.

But I still don't agree with you, and feel certain that very few sound
engineers would agree with you. Scott Dorsey said it (see above). Both
for the sake of esthetics and for the intelligibility of musical
meaning, a good stereo recording helps the listener's brain to engage
with what is being played.

So what I would call "obvious" is this: Assuming that something worth
recording is there in the first place, good mono is preferable to bad
stereo, but good stereo is best of all.

And it's equally obvious, I hope, that finding out the definition of
"good" in recording is a lifetime's work.

--best holiday regards
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 5:23:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <cqsuu6$i3a$1@panix2.panix.com> kludge@panix.com writes:

> Even recording something like a piano or violin, you're really recording
> the room and not the instrument. And the room _is_ in stereo. You want
> to give a sense of the space that the instrument is in, not just the
> instrument itself.

Definitely the way to go, if the final product is a recording of a
solo instrument. But when it comes to recording a piano or a violin
(which are traditionally "classical" instruments) all by its lonesome
as part of a multitrack recording which will get the room-in-a-box
treatment in production, there's nothing wrong with using a single mic
or committing it to a single track, most of the time.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 4:33:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

calcerise@hotmail.com wrote:

> Seems obvious to me that MONO is the way to record any solo
> classical instrument, except perhaps pipe organ.

No.

You haven't been to very many concerts, have you? - real concerts, those
where the audio comes from the instrument(s) via the room, and not via
loudspeakers. Look for some nearby chamber music event and listen to how
the instruments actually sound and to how their sound behaves in the
room, and indeed to how the room responds.

Quite similar concerns apply to some, albeit not all, electrically
amplified instruments. Mono recording is gravely unfair to open back
guitar amps as well as to Leslie loudspeakers, for the very same set of
reasons.

Actually recording more tracks in real stereo with real (old world)
microphone placements (no offense intended) would seem to be a possibly
very interesting strategy for making contemporary multimic&track
recordings now that there is a lot less track limitation and a lot less
mixdown limitiations to worry about with everything getting scaleable.


Kind regards

Peter Larsen

--
*******************************************
* My site is at: http://www.muyiovatki.dk *
*******************************************
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 1:30:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:49:10 -0500, Scott Dorsey wrote
(in article <cqsuu6$i3a$1@panix2.panix.com>):

> In article <1104280829.058950.3810@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
> <calcerise@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> Seems obvious to me that MONO is the way to record any solo classical
>> instrument, except perhaps pipe organ.
>
> Even recording something like a piano or violin, you're really recording
> the room and not the instrument. And the room _is_ in stereo. You want
> to give a sense of the space that the instrument is in, not just the
> instrument itself.
> --scott
>
>

well the room is more like in surround, but mono with THE RIGHT MIC works
fine.

I've recently uploaded files to my audio download folder that prove the
point.

Smiles,

Ty Ford

-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 7:20:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 22:30:13 -0500, Ty Ford <tyreeford@comcast.net>
wrote:

>On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:49:10 -0500, Scott Dorsey wrote
>(in article <cqsuu6$i3a$1@panix2.panix.com>):

>> Even recording something like a piano or violin, you're really recording
>> the room and not the instrument. And the room _is_ in stereo. You want
>> to give a sense of the space that the instrument is in, not just the
>> instrument itself.

>well the room is more like in surround, but mono with THE RIGHT MIC works
>fine.

"A paradox, a paradox, a most ...(something)... paradox.
It is, it is
It is, it is,
A most ...(something)... paradox."

What puzzles me is that I can hear "depth" in a good recording,
even (especially?) on antique media, on one-speaker mono, but
I can't hear "binaural" no matter what. There's gotta be some
wide variations from the norm in us six billion large primates.

Happy New Year,

Chris Hornbeck
"They'd meet at the Tout Va Bien."
-JLG, _Bande a part_, 1964
!