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Installing 7 to SSD with upgrade version, Vista on other HDD

Last response: in Windows 7
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February 18, 2010 8:24:00 PM

Hey all,
I searched for a solution to my issue and could not quite find anything exactly like it. Here is what I have and what I am looking to do:

I currently have a HDD in an HP system, with OEM Vista loaded on it. I just purchased a retail copy of Windows 7 Home premium upgrade and a SSD. I plan to use the SSD for boot, windows, and World of Warcraft.

What I want: To do a clean install of Windows 7 on the SSD. I plan to wipeout the HDD afterward and use it as a storage drive, as I have no use for Vista.

Question: What is the easiest way to do this? I was planning to just hook it all up, pop the Windows 7 disk in, start it up, and do a custom install to the SSD. Load up windows, activate the thing, then wipe the HDD. However, someone said that might not work and I might have to call Microsoft with my Vista key.

Any guidance on this would be appreciated. Thanks!
February 18, 2010 9:01:37 PM

Hi ya, unhook your old drive for the moment. Hook up the new drive and do the clean install you may or may not be asked for a cd/dvd driver, but that is windows wanting the stata controller driver so have that standing by to be installed. After that you can hook the old drive back up and grab any data you want off the old drive and do a long format through disk management. First though you need to read up on the ssd you intend to install. Some need to be "aligned" for the best speed and the proper setup. The steps to do that are way too long to cover here. Google is your friend.

Best solution

a b $ Windows 7
February 18, 2010 9:28:37 PM
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Don't sweat alignment with win 7, It does it.

As to freash instal recommended by topper743 - yes, with some cavets.

During the instal do not input your serial number. After install, let windows do any updates. Two things you need to do before entering your Key (you have 30 to do this.
Need to check one of my old replies to give you the steps. Will post back.

ADDED
To install using an upgrade install disk (Must Own a qualifing Operating system - Does not have to be installed).

Do a Clean Install, But DO NOT enter your Key
Goahead and let windows 7 down load critical updates. Then:

Open regedit.exe with Start Menu Search and navigate to:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/Software/Microsoft/Windows/CurrentVersion/Setup/OOBE
Easier - Just do a search for " MediaBootInstall"

Change MediaBootInstall from "1" to "0". (Double-click it and then enter 0 in the dialog that appears.)

Close RegEdit.

Open the Start Menu again and type cmd in Start Menu search to display a shortcut to the Command Line utility. Right-click this shortcut and choose "Run as administrator." Handle the UAC prompt.

In the command line window, type: slmgr /rearm

Then tap ENTER and wait for the "Command completed successfully" dialog.

Then, close the command line window and reboot. When Windows 7 reboots, run the Activate Windows utility, type in your product key and activate windows.

Related resources
a b $ Windows 7
February 18, 2010 11:44:39 PM

First unplug the power or signal cable from your old hard drive.

Then install w7 on the SSD.

If you are nervous about the method that retiredchief described, then do this.
There is a legitimate two step instalation process to install an upgrade version
You install windows-7 from the cd, but do not initially enter the product code or activate.
After it installs, you have a fully functional OS for 30 days.
Step 2 is to insert the dvd again, while running Windows and then do an upgrade.
This time, enter your product code, and activate.
After activation. you may delete the initial version which is named windows.old.
This process takes longer but avoids a registry edit.

When you reconnect your old drive, you should see all your old files.
February 19, 2010 1:32:21 AM

Hmmm...i might try the regedit way, simply because it will give me the cleanest install and if it screws up, I'll just do the method geofelt recommended.

But since Geo brought it up, another question...if I do this and load it as the 64 bit version, I won't be able to access my vista 32 bit files, right? So if I left everything on the 250, I wouldn't be able to get to it anyways with the SSD?
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 1:42:53 AM

Rhayven44 said:
Hmmm...i might try the regedit way, simply because it will give me the cleanest install and if it screws up, I'll just do the method geofelt recommended.

But since Geo brought it up, another question...if I do this and load it as the 64 bit version, I won't be able to access my vista 32 bit files, right? So if I left everything on the 250, I wouldn't be able to get to it anyways with the SSD?


Not to worry.

The files are the same, and accessable from either 32 or 64 bit OS'es. Your programs must be reinstalled on the 64 bit OS. You should still be able to dual boot 32 bit vista and access any data on 64 bit windows-7 or vice versa.

I think the two step install is the cleanest and safest approach. It just takes longer.
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 2:14:05 AM

geofelt - Have used both methods. The double install with vista and the edit registry with win 7. While the end result was the same, Prefer the edit registy method as it results in a lot less writing to an SSD which is not a big deal for HDDs.

I think On a Hard drive, you can over write a file, not so on an SSD as I think it marks it for deltion and rewrites the file in another location.
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 3:27:06 PM

RetiredChief said:
geofelt - Have used both methods. The double install with vista and the edit registry with win 7. While the end result was the same, Prefer the edit registy method as it results in a lot less writing to an SSD which is not a big deal for HDDs.

I think On a Hard drive, you can over write a file, not so on an SSD as I think it marks it for deltion and rewrites the file in another location.


On a SSD, the penalty on writing depends on trim support.

If the drive is trim capable, and if the OS passes on the trim command(Windows-7 does if you use AHCI) then no rewrite occurs in the SSD when a file is deleted.
a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2010 4:19:11 PM

geofelt
may be mistaken, but the trim cmd is only invoked under certain conditions, ie issue a "delete file" cmd. During the installation of the OS, I don't think Trim is active. But end result is you are correct in that the trim cmd would return the SSD to "New" after installation.
July 11, 2010 2:39:33 AM

Best answer selected by Rhayven44.
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