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RIP: Artie Shaw

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Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:58:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The last of the great big band leaders and one of the best. I guess I'll just
have to face the fact that this generation will soon all be gone.

More about : rip artie shaw

Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:58:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I had the good fortune to have lunch with Artie many years ago. We all know
he was an exceptionally fine clarinetist. Some do not know he was one of the
few swing era players also to master bebop.

He was extremely intelligent. Everything he told me about the music business
and the musicians who came up in our conversation about turned out to be
right on the money. I tried to contact him about a year ago; he was a
neighbor. But he had lost his hearing and pretty much withdrew so I was
unable to speak to him.

I don't think he missed the music business. I doubt he even missed music
itself very much. He might have missed performing and being a star but that
would have required being back in the business, something he
(understandably) no longer wanted anything to do with. He had focussed his
efforts on writing books. He was a down to earth guy and he expressed
himself plainly. I'm glad I had the opportunity to spend time with him.

"Uncle Russ" Reinberg

WESTLAKE PUBLISHING COMPANY
www.finescalerr.com
WESTLAKE RECORDS
www.westlakerecords.com


"Jim Kollens" <jimkollens@aol.com> wrote...

> The last of the great big band leaders and one of the best. I guess I'll
> just
> have to face the fact that this generation will soon all be gone.
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:58:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 31 Dec 2004 01:58:15 GMT, jimkollens@aol.com (Jim Kollens) wrote:

>The last of the great big band leaders and one of the best. I guess I'll just
>have to face the fact that this generation will soon all be gone. <snip>

I think Artie was just about the last of them. Harry James, the
Dorseys, Goodman...all long gone. Who else is left?

That was an era of real musicians...America's greatest legacy of
popular music, like it or not.

<...spinning "Begin The Beguine" in tribute...>

dB
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 5:28:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jim Kollens wrote:
> The last of the great big band leaders and one of the best. I guess I'll just
> have to face the fact that this generation will soon all be gone.


The big hit, was it "In the Mood"?

That is the most beautiful tone I've ever heard out of
any instrument, any era, any genre.

Thanks for that alone. RIP.

--
--
John Noll
Retromedia Sound Studios
Red Bank, NJ

jn145_deletethisfirst_@verizon.net

http://www.retromedia.net
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 5:28:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

no - that was Glen Miller - Artie Shaw's biggest was Begin The Beguine.

"John Noll" <jn145_deletethisfirst_@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:41D4B88D.4010807@verizon.net...
> Jim Kollens wrote:
> > The last of the great big band leaders and one of the best. I guess
I'll just
> > have to face the fact that this generation will soon all be gone.
>
>
> The big hit, was it "In the Mood"?
>
> That is the most beautiful tone I've ever heard out of
> any instrument, any era, any genre.
>
> Thanks for that alone. RIP.
>
> --
> --
> John Noll
> Retromedia Sound Studios
> Red Bank, NJ
>
> jn145_deletethisfirst_@verizon.net
>
> http://www.retromedia.net
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 6:29:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 19:12:18 -0800, "Uncle Russ"
<uncruss@adelphia.net> wrote:

> He was a down to earth guy and he expressed
>himself plainly.

NPR's afternoon news show included a really fascinating short
piece that may still be available. One interview segment had
him grousing about the interviewer's statement that he'd had
eight wives (although he never actually denied it).
Several of them were movie stars.

They never explained why he put down his ax (in the 1950's?)
and never played again.

Gotta be a lot of story there. RIP.

Chris Hornbeck
"They'd meet at the Tout Va Bien."
-JLG, _Bande a part_, 1964
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 6:29:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Artie stopped playing in the 1950s out of sheer exasperation with the
recording industry. He always wanted to create different kinds of music and
felt the record companies prevented him from doing that. For example, after
he quit the business in the '40s, he returned with a big band and strings --
somewhat novel at the time.

So, in the 1950s, when bebop was the fashionable genre of jazz, Artie got
together a band of all stars and landed a lounge gig in Las Vegas to play
bop. The guys would play until about 2 a.m., break for breakfast, then go
into the studio (at Artie's expense) and record until sunrise. The result
filled four CDs.

But no record company would touch it. They all told Artie the public wanted
Begin the Beguine with the big band, or Frenesi, but not bop with a sextet.
Artie said nobody was going to dictate what kind of music he played and hung
up the horn. He never played again. He even took one of his clarinets and
made a lamp out of it. (The CDs currently are available but did not appear
until around 1982.)

I think Artie's main motivation, aside from ego, was the pursuit of absolute
perfection. He had an amazing command of the instrument because he practiced
like a fiend. As a decent clarinetist myself, I can tell you it's pretty
challenging to play well and it would be easy to devote a lifetime to trying
to master the instrument. So when Artie no longer could get what he wanted
from playing music, he turned his perfectionism to writing (mainly about
himself).

He always remained very bitter toward the record companies. Most musicians
would agree with him but few are willing to express it, fewer would have the
guts to tell the companies to go screw themselves, and fewer still have the
talent to express themselves as eloquently as Artie. Quite a guy.

A couple of great Artie Shaw lines:

Q: What's the biggest difference between you and Benny Goodman?
A: Lana Turner.

Then, many years later:
Q: What's the biggest difference between you and Benny Goodman?
A: I'm still alive. (Something he attributed to no longer being a musician!)

I probaby know more stuff but I'd probably need a question or two to
remember it.

Uncle Russ

WESTLAKE PUBLISHING COMPANY
www.finescalerr.com
WESTLAKE RECORDS
www.westlakerecords.com

"Chris Hornbeck" <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote in message
news:ngh9t0h5lo38g1nu7u8rm0lsq90nknh6m7@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 19:12:18 -0800, "Uncle Russ"
> <uncruss@adelphia.net> wrote:
>
>> He was a down to earth guy and he expressed
>>himself plainly.
>
> NPR's afternoon news show included a really fascinating short
> piece that may still be available. One interview segment had
> him grousing about the interviewer's statement that he'd had
> eight wives (although he never actually denied it).
> Several of them were movie stars.
>
> They never explained why he put down his ax (in the 1950's?)
> and never played again.
>
> Gotta be a lot of story there. RIP.
>
> Chris Hornbeck
> "They'd meet at the Tout Va Bien."
> -JLG, _Bande a part_, 1964
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 12:50:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Uncle Russ" <uncruss@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:Nt-dnYwfu9udhEjcRVn-1Q@adelphia.com...

> He always remained very bitter toward the record companies. Most musicians
> would agree with him but few are willing to express it, fewer would have
the
> guts to tell the companies to go screw themselves,

However, he wasn't completely above continuing to make a buck off the big
band stuff. I remember back in the late 70's or early 80's, another "Artie
Shaw orchestra" was put on the road, though sans Artie. I don't know what
the details were but I doubt he lent his name for free.
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 1:13:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 09:50:16 GMT, "HiC" <brassplyer@nospamyahoo.com>
wrote:

>However, he wasn't completely above continving to make a bvck off the big
>band stvff. I remember back in the late 70's or early 80's, another "Artie
>Shaw orchestra" was pvt on the road, thovgh sans Artie. I don't know what
>the details were bvt I dovbt he lent his name for free. <snip>

I seem to remember a revnion of his famovsly good 1949 band that did
some tovring back arovnd that era.

dB
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:52:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

skhoover wrote:
> no - that was Glen Miller - Artie Shaw's biggest was Begin The Beguine.
>

Thanks. That's the one I meant. duh.


--
--
John Noll
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 5:44:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Chris Hornbeck" <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote in message
news:ngh9t0h5lo38g1nu7u8rm0lsq90nknh6m7@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 19:12:18 -0800, "Uncle Russ"
> <uncruss@adelphia.net> wrote:
>
>> He was a down to earth guy and he expressed
>>himself plainly.
>
> NPR's afternoon news show included a really fascinating short
> piece that may still be available. One interview segment had
> him grousing about the interviewer's statement that he'd had
> eight wives (although he never actually denied it).
> Several of them were movie stars.
>
> They never explained why he put down his ax (in the 1950's?)
> and never played again.
>
> Gotta be a lot of story there. RIP.
>
> Chris Hornbeck
> "They'd meet at the Tout Va Bien."
> -JLG, _Bande a part_, 1964


I hope Artie rests in peace now. He seemed such a restless soul during his
long and active life. I always thought it was six marriages including Ava
Gardner, Lana Turner & Evelyn Keyes, anyone care to name them? I know he
'retired' quite a few times, once in 1934 when he hoped to write a book but
without working his money was running out. In 1939 he gave up music yet
again to go to Mexico. He broke and reformed bands a few times also but each
time brought yet another big hit. 'Begin The Beguine' in 1938, later a
string section for the hit 'Frenesi'. He broke up his orchestra in 1941 and
reformed with yet a larger one. Maybe I'll look out his autobiography 'The
Trouble with Cinderella' for more clues. He's left a wonderful legacy of
music and I feel he'll be remembered also as being a great clarinettist and
its a pity he was such a restless and uneasy person within himself.... and
outspoken bandleader as well! RIP now Artie and thanks for all the music.

Mike
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 8:57:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Gilmour" <mike@tfjazz.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:jL2dnQszWKhA-EjcRVn-qA@nildram.net...
>>
> I hope Artie rests in peace now. He seemed such a restless soul during his
> long and active life. I always thought it was six marriages including Ava
> Gardner, Lana Turner & Evelyn Keyes, anyone care to name them? I know he
> 'retired' quite a few times, once in 1934 when he hoped to write a book
> but without working his money was running out. In 1939 he gave up music
> yet again to go to Mexico. He broke and reformed bands a few times also
> but each time brought yet another big hit. 'Begin The Beguine' in 1938,
> later a string section for the hit 'Frenesi'. He broke up his orchestra in
> 1941 and reformed with yet a larger one. Maybe I'll look out his
> autobiography 'The Trouble with Cinderella' for more clues. He's left a
> wonderful legacy of music and I feel he'll be remembered also as being a
> great clarinettist and its a pity he was such a restless and uneasy person
> within himself.... and outspoken bandleader as well! RIP now Artie and
> thanks for all the music.
>
> Mike
>
>
Found the names of seven wives so far..
Not in order:

1) Lana Turner 2) Ava Gardner 3) Kathlene Winsor 4) Evelyn Keyes 5)
Betty Kern 6) Margaret Allen 7) Doris Dowlin 8)?

Mike
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 9:12:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Uncle Russ" <uncruss@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:Nt-dnYwfu9udhEjcRVn-1Q@adelphia.com...

> Q: What's the biggest difference between you and Benny Goodman?
> A: Lana Turner.

Then there's the time he played the straight man. He was doing a USO show
(was he in the service himself at the time?) when a GI came up to him and
asked, "Mr. Shaw, could you do me a favor? Could I shake your hand?" Shaw
shook hands with the man, of course, then asked, "Why did you particularly
want to do that?" "Oh," replied the soldier, "I just wanted to shake the
hand that patted Lana Turner's ass."

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 4:12:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 03:29:40 GMT, Chris Hornbeck
<chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote:

>They never explained why he put down his ax (in the 1950's?)
>and never played again.
>
>Gotta be a lot of story there. RIP.

He explains it in his autobio "The Trouble with Cinderella."
Basically, he felt his life paid the price of fame occuring too
quickly at too young an age. The celebrity and the rapaciousness of
the music business burned him out, and he quit to save his life.
Willie K. Yee, M.D. http://users.bestweb.net/~wkyee
Developer of Problem Knowledge Couplers for Psychiatry http://www.pkc.com
Webmaster and Guitarist for the Big Blue Big Band http://www.bigbluebigband.org
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 5:17:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 01:12:59 GMT, wkyee@bestweb.netttttttttttttttt
(Willie K.Yee, M.D.) wrote:

>On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 03:29:40 GMT, Chris Hornbeck
><chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote:
>
>>They never explained why he put down his ax (in the 1950's?)
>>and never played again.
>>
>>Gotta be a lot of story there. RIP.
>
>He explains it in his autobio "The Trouble with Cinderella."
>Basically, he felt his life paid the price of fame occuring too
>quickly at too young an age. The celebrity and the rapaciousness of
>the music business burned him out, and he quit to save his life.

Thanks for the follow-up. Put so poetically, his life sounds
like Scorsese should have chosen him for a biopic instead of HH.
Or maybe a sequel, the one who survived.

Thanks, and Happy New Gregorian Year,

Chris Hornbeck
"They'd meet at the Tout Va Bien."
-JLG, _Bande a part_, 1964
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 5:46:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

As I had explained earlier, Artie recorded a lot of bebop with an all star
group in 1953-54 at his own expense. When the record companies refused to
release it, he took his toys and went home. It was the last straw for a guy
who disliked the business in the first place.

He told me that, face to face. That's the answer.

"Uncle Russ" Reinberg

WESTLAKE PUBLISHING COMPANY
www.finescalerr.com
WESTLAKE RECORDS
www.westlakerecords.com

"Willie K.Yee, M.D." <wkyee@bestweb.netttttttttttttttt> wrote in message
news:41d5f89c.82142028@nntp.bestweb.net...
> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 03:29:40 GMT, Chris Hornbeck
> <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote:
>
>>They never explained why he put down his ax (in the 1950's?)
>>and never played again.
>>
>>Gotta be a lot of story there. RIP.
>
> He explains it in his autobio "The Trouble with Cinderella."
> Basically, he felt his life paid the price of fame occuring too
> quickly at too young an age. The celebrity and the rapaciousness of
> the music business burned him out, and he quit to save his life.
> Willie K. Yee, M.D. http://users.bestweb.net/~wkyee
> Developer of Problem Knowledge Couplers for Psychiatry http://www.pkc.com
> Webmaster and Guitarist for the Big Blue Big Band
> http://www.bigbluebigband.org
>
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 6:10:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 02:17:36 GMT, Chris Hornbeck
<chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote:

> Put so poetically, his life sounds
>like Scorsese should have chosen him for a biopic instead of HH.
>Or maybe a sequel, the one who survived.

Quitting the business and leading a sane, calm life in the country for
decades thereafter is not the stuff of Hollywood.


Willie K. Yee, M.D. http://users.bestweb.net/~wkyee
Developer of Problem Knowledge Couplers for Psychiatry http://www.pkc.com
Webmaster and Guitarist for the Big Blue Big Band http://www.bigbluebigband.org
Anonymous
January 8, 2005 10:31:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
>Thanks for the follow-up. Put so poetically, his life sounds
>like Scorsese should have chosen him for a biopic instead of HH.
>Or maybe a sequel, the one who survived.

I would bet that Artie wouldn't have sold the rights to his life.
Phil Brown
!