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Something is wrong, no idea what

Last response: in Windows 7
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February 18, 2010 11:11:06 PM

There is something wrong with my new home-built computer, but I couldn't diagnose what yet.

First, most of the time, everything works well with no failure or so, but then sometimes:

Brief description of the problem: Sometimes, while the Win 7 is on, everything's working well with no problem, the internal speaker starts beeping long beeps, which doesn't have a matching beep pattern with the ones in the troubleshooting part of the manual of the motherboard.

In addition to this, sometimes, when I shut down the computer, and start up the system the following day, right after the Win 7 logo screen, the computer shuts down and restarts and then ask me if I want a normal startup or a repair startup. When I select repair, it doesn't do anything. When I select normal startup it tries starting up again but resets right after Win 7 logo again. It keeps doing this if I don't interrupt and shut down manually.

Brief system specification:
Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
Gigabyte GA-MA785GMT-UD2H Motherboard
AMD Phenom II X4 965 Processor
2x2 G.Skill DDR3 1333 Memory
WD velociraptor 300 Hard Disk
Samsung 1000 Hard Disk

I suspect that there is a hardware problem, but I have no idea what could be causing the problem. Is there a software to test all of the component? Or any ideas about the source of the problem or how to diagnose it?

More about : wrong idea

February 19, 2010 12:01:13 AM

memtest86 doesn't run with 64 bit. Any other ideas?
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February 19, 2010 12:05:19 AM

aford10 said:
Try running memtest on your RAM.
http://www.memtest86.com/


Seconded. With random reboots, I always test RAM first. If not that, then it could be power supply, but the motherboard beeps are most likely indicating RAM failure.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 12:09:03 AM

Memtest86+ does support 64bit.
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February 19, 2010 12:10:04 AM

I just tried it and it didn't install. Let me check again.
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February 19, 2010 12:17:12 AM

I will be trying it in 15 minutes and let you know about the result. Just burned the bootable disk.
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February 19, 2010 3:47:08 AM

Okay, the result is: the system passes the memtest with no error.

So, what else can it be?
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February 19, 2010 4:29:38 AM

I tried to clean boot. Worked well. Then half of the services. Worked well. Then the other half. Worked well. Then enabled all again. Now works well. -as if nothing is wrong... Since the problem occurs very occasionally I am not sure how well this procedure can help me to find the problem.

Can the warning sounds be due to the pc health status in bios? CPU warning temperature is set to 60 degrees Celcius. It says it would emit warning sound if the CPU temperature exceeds the threshold, but then it doesn't explain the type of the sound.

Continuous long beeps are associated with "Graphics card not inserted properly" in the manual. But I don't have a graphics card. I use what's on board.
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February 19, 2010 4:42:57 AM

Ok, it says "High frequency beeeps while running: Overheated CPU: Check the CPU fan for proper operation. Check the case for proper air flow."
http://www.bioscentral.com/beepcodes/awardbeep.htm

I can see that the fans work well. Then it's probably that 60 degree threshold. But what is a proper heat level? Is it safe to increase the threshold to 70 or 80? I don't want to burn the CPU.

And if it is due to the CPU heat, why does the system continuously restart although the computer cools down over the night?
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a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 5:08:28 AM

Do you have any temp. monitoring tool installed??
If not Download & install one
http://www.hmonitor.net/ and check the CPU temp!

About continuous reboot, I have no idea :( 
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February 19, 2010 5:24:05 AM

What kind of power supply?
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a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 7:04:05 PM

How many passes did you allow memtest to make before deciding everything was good? Ideally, you should allow it to run overnight and have it run at least 10 passes to see if there are any issues.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 7:34:50 PM

Zoron said:
How many passes did you allow memtest to make before deciding everything was good? Ideally, you should allow it to run overnight and have it run at least 10 passes to see if there are any issues.


^ Agreed. It's not a 15 minute test for stability.
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February 19, 2010 9:52:49 PM

No, it wasn't a 15 minutes test, it was for about 3 hours. I had 4 passes. I saw a line which says something kind of "the test is passed, press esc key to exit" so I though the test was over and it was just re-doing the test. I'll run it today for 10 passes, and let you know about the results.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 11:03:13 PM

You have three problems with this computer, the first is that the processor is overheating, and should be the first problem that you sort out. The second problem is that your computer is not shutting down correctly, which is probably a driver problem or maybe due to the processor over heating and the third problem is the computer not booting up correctly which could be caused by a driver problem or over heating CPU. I would change the boot up option on windows 7 to disable the “restart on error “ option to find out what is causing the problem.
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February 20, 2010 6:32:06 PM

Okay, this time I let the memtest run all night long and I got 24 passes with 0 error.

I'll be testing the cpu and watching the temperature carefully.
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February 20, 2010 7:46:34 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
1st step - http://www.memtest.org/

2nd step - http://www.ocbase.com/perestroika_en/index.php?Download

Run CPU / Memory and PSU Torture tests....look at graphs at end for any anomalies.



After running the OCCT test, the CPU temperature increased to above 60 degrees C within a minute, and the internal speaker started to emit the long beeps that I was talking about. So I think the reason for the long beeps was the "beep when the temp is over 60" bios setting. A software or something which runs occasionally is probably causing the increase in the temperature I don't know what. I can change the setting in bios to a higher temperature, but I'm not sure what the maximum temperature should be. Is 70 degrees C a good maximum temperature for my processor?


And is it normal to get a 60 something temperature within the first minute of a OCCT test? Normally, the CPU temperature is around 41.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 21, 2010 12:34:01 AM

Your CPU temps are a little high, but not dangerously high. If you start getting into the 75+ range, then you have a problem. Good CPU temps are usually down in the mid 30s at idle temps.

You may want to reapply some thermal paste on the CPU cooler, or get an aftermarket one.
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February 21, 2010 2:04:41 AM

Since AMD says that the maximum temperature for my CPU is 62, I left the bios setting as it is (>60 => beep)
http://products.amd.com/en-na/DesktopCPUDetail.aspx?id=...

But then I changed another setting, the CPU fan speed. It was set to be auto adjusted. I set it to work at maximum speed. So now the idle temp is around 38. Maybe I should buy two additional fans for my CM storm scout case. I thought there was enough air flow inside.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b $ Windows 7
February 21, 2010 6:48:20 AM

I think that your temperatures are too high particularly if they reach 60C in only a minute, although increasing the fan speed will help I don’t think that this is the cause of your problem. The fact that the temperature rises so quickly would indicate to me that the heatsink is not mounted correctly on the processor but is at an angle so that only half of the heatsink is making contact with the processor. Try refitting the heatsink.
.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 21, 2010 2:59:47 PM

mukarakaplan said:
After running the OCCT test, the CPU temperature increased to above 60 degrees C within a minute, and the internal speaker started to emit the long beeps that I was talking about. So I think the reason for the long beeps was the "beep when the temp is over 60" bios setting. A software or something which runs occasionally is probably causing the increase in the temperature I don't know what. I can change the setting in bios to a higher temperature, but I'm not sure what the maximum temperature should be. Is 70 degrees C a good maximum temperature for my processor?


And is it normal to get a 60 something temperature within the first minute of a OCCT test? Normally, the CPU temperature is around 41.


My son's 920 never breaks 54 at a 3.7 overclock .... low 70's at 4.2 - 4.4

Sound slike you need a better HS or to reseat the old one with a new layer of TIM.
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February 22, 2010 12:28:18 AM

I am convinced that there is a problem with the heat sink, especially after checking the OCCT forums. This is what happens in my case as well:
http://www.ocbase.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=198

Well, anyway, so I opened the case to check if the heat sink is not mounted correctly. There are only two latches, which keep the heat sink connected to the motherboard, and there is actually only one way to put it right. And it looks well mounted, latches are tight and holding the sink firm. Nothing looks skewed... Nothing jiggles except the plastic fan at the top of the sink, but it doesn't move much and I don't think that's a big deal.

I wanted to remove the heat sink to check the thermal compound and put more if necessary, so I released the latches and tried really hard to pull the heat sink but it's stuck. I was the one who put it there so I am sure there is nothing else that keeps them together -but the thermal compound. So I didn't (or maybe couldn't) pull the heat sink off. I mean, if the thermal paste is that much to hold the sink there this tight, then I think the amount should be enough, no?... If not, how can I take this heat sink off?
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a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2010 3:44:59 AM

Run the computer for a while to warm up the heatsink, then it should come off easy.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2010 5:20:58 AM

Further to my last reply, make sure the computer is off and UNPLUGED before removing the heatsink as the processor will be almost instantly destroyed if the computer is on or gets accidently switched on.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2010 11:00:30 AM

pjmelect said:
Run the computer for a while to warm up the heatsink, then it should come off easy.


+1
The thermal paste creates a seal. It can some effort and a gentle touch to remove them sometimes.
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February 25, 2010 10:09:45 AM

[SOLVED]

Yesterday, just to see that I can take the heatsink off, I tried to twist and pull it right after running the OCMT for a minute or so. Of course I turned off the computer and unplugged it before pulling the heatsink, but thanks for the warning. It did come off very easily as you said. Then I orders Arctic Silver 5, but it takes time to get it, you know, and the local stores have only the low quality thermal material. I was kind of impatient and wanted to test a couple of other things. So guess what I did. Hehe. I wiped off most of the compound on the surfaces of the CPU and heatsink and attached the heatsink back into its position (aren't I crazy? DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME!) And then I put an industrial strength super fan in front of the stock fan of AMD and started it. And then I turned on the computer. It just started as if nothing had changed (although there was almost no thermal compound between the CPU and the heatsink) and then the softwares reported the same temperatures as before. OCCT test failed after the first minute because of high temperature (>62).

Then I turned off the super fan while the computer was on, and watched the temperature but nothing had changed. I tell you, AMD's stock fan is real good. Anyway, while risking my 200 dollars or maybe even more, I realized that maybe the problem was not due to the thermal compound, or the fan or the heatsink... Then I checked the CPU voltage with SpeedFan and OCCT, and it was set to something around 1. But after running OCCT, the voltage was shooting the 1.60-2 range in the first minute. The recommended range of voltage for my CPU is stated to be between 0.825 and 1.40.
http://products.amd.com/en-us/DesktopCPUDetail.aspx?id=...

So obviously the CPU voltage volatility was the problem. But why was it volatile? Because of the EVIL AMD Cool'n'Quiet option in BIOS which is enabled as default, as if it does an awesome job. And they don't know how EVIL it is. EVIL. The general idea of this Cool'n'Quiet is to set a low voltage when not much task is around, and increase the voltage if more work is needed. But then I understood that when it gives very low voltage to the CPU, Windows cannot even start up and HENCE is "the restart loops" problem mentioned in my initial post. And when CPU is loaded by OCCT, or other regular tasks, it gives a very high voltage to the CPU, HENCE the temperature gets very high, BIOS starts beeping, and Windows eventually gives a blue screen and the computer shuts down, which were again mentioned in my inital post as the pieces of the problem.

So what I did was: I turned off the EVIL Cool'n'Quiet option in BIOS, set the CPU voltage manually to 1.40. I got a very good idle/full loaded (34-56 C) temperature range with this voltage but I wasn't satisfied, so I set the CPU voltage to 1.225 (the lowest stable under full load). With this setting OCCT auto test runs for 1 hour without giving any errors. The min and max temperatures are 32-52 C. Isn't it amazing???

Now the computer runs without any problems or beeps, idling around 32, and I am a happy man. I'd like to thank you all. You guys are so helpful and just so awesome.

And ah, arctic silver 5 is coming tomorrow and I will put some there for sure (yes, just a little). Hopefully it will decrease the temperatures even more like a degree or two...
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a b $ Windows 7
February 25, 2010 10:56:46 AM

Thanks for the update mukarakaplan. Glad you got it figured out.
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February 25, 2010 11:03:43 AM

I have to select one of the replies other than mine as the best answer to set the thread as solved. I think you all deserve the honor :)  but I can give it to only one. So I'm giving it to aford10 for his quick replies, number of posts in this thread and contribution to the solution. Thanks.
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February 25, 2010 11:04:06 AM

Best answer selected by mukarakaplan.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 25, 2010 11:06:15 AM

mukarakaplan said:
I have to select one of the replies other than mine as the best answer to set the thread as solved. I think you all deserve the honor :)  but I can give it to only one. So I'm giving it to aford10 for his quick replies, number of posts in this thread and contribution to the solution. Thanks.


Almost feels unworthy. :lol: 
Thanks for the vote though.
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February 25, 2010 11:09:30 AM

aford10 said:
Almost feels unworthy. :lol: 
Thanks for the vote though.


Hehehe, you just got your medal! :lol:  Congratulations!
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February 26, 2010 6:05:41 AM

Congrats on the medal aford! (haven't you had it a while or is that other topics?)

Anyways, Can I keep your stapler now?
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a b $ Windows 7
February 26, 2010 10:42:54 AM

Nope, just got this one. I kind of backed into this bronze. :lol: 

Don't you have it?? It's the red Swingline.
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February 26, 2010 6:22:10 PM

The red swingline? Yeah I have it, can I keep it?

That would make my collection one red swingline, one green swingline with yellow pin-striping and one pimped out hole punch.
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February 26, 2010 8:59:14 PM

LMAO... That's gold!
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February 26, 2010 9:05:13 PM

Looks like a good movie... Adding it to my must see list.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 26, 2010 9:34:12 PM

You've never seen office space??? It's a must see!

It's right there with Supertroopers as my favorite comedy.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 31, 2012 3:41:22 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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