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Recommended Multi-track sound editing software

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Anonymous
January 3, 2005 8:39:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello:
I am looking to buy multi-track sound editing software. I would like to
make some home recordings with voices, midi, and acoustic instruments.
I dont have any experience with this software. The last time I did any
recording like this I was using a Fostex 4 track analog machine. I
would like to be able to use my PC to do it. It isn't necessary to use
top of the line but I am interested in the advantages.

If anyone could point me in the right direction i would appreciate it
very much. It lookedlike this wpould be the right place to ask. Are
there any other groups or forums where I am likely to find this
information?

TIA

Carl
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 11:37:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Carl Tuba wrote:
> Hello:
> I am looking to buy multi-track sound editing software. I would like
to
> make some home recordings with voices, midi, and acoustic
instruments.
> I dont have any experience with this software. The last time I did
any
> recording like this I was using a Fostex 4 track analog machine. I
> would like to be able to use my PC to do it. It isn't necessary to
use
> top of the line but I am interested in the advantages.
>
> If anyone could point me in the right direction i would appreciate it
> very much. It lookedlike this wpould be the right place to ask. Are
> there any other groups or forums where I am likely to find this
> information?

You might want to start out with something good and free like Audacity.
Search google for the author's web site.
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 3:13:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1104759540.663721.132420@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com> CarlTuba@juno.com writes:

> I am looking to buy multi-track sound editing software. I would like to
> make some home recordings with voices, midi, and acoustic instruments.
> I dont have any experience with this software.

There are many commercial products that you could buy, but I'd suggest
that you cut your teeth (or decide whether you actually want to pursue
this approach to recording) on an inexpensive tryware program N-Track
Studio if you're using Windows. A visit to http://www.fasoft.com will
get you some details and you can download a trial version.

Another good buy is Music Studio from Magix. This is the entry level
version of two "pro grade" programs Samplitude and Sequoia and appears
to contain all the features and functions that anyone but a heavy duty
user could want, the same mixing and processing engines as the heavy
duty programs, and a bargain basement price. I've seen it on the shelf
at Best Buy for around $60. But like any powerful software, it has a
powerful learning curve.

http://site.magix.net/index.php?id=411

If you're on a Mac, say so. Maybe there's an equivalent, but I'm not
in that world.

And if you're not committed to learning to use your computer for this,
you might look into many of the current digital hard-disk based
versions of the 4-track cassette recorder/mixer that you've used in
the past. These run from 4 to 24 tracks and from just a couple of
hundred bucks up to a couple of thousand. But they're very
straightforward to use and if you're more interested in recording
music than learning about computers, it might be a good way to go.




--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Related resources
January 3, 2005 6:24:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike T. wrote:
> On 3 Jan 2005 05:39:00 -0800, "Carl Tuba" <CarlTuba@juno.com> wrote:
>
> >Hello:
> >I am looking to buy multi-track sound editing software. I would like
to
> >make some home recordings with voices, midi, and acoustic
instruments.
> >I dont have any experience with this software. The last time I did
any
> >recording like this I was using a Fostex 4 track analog machine. I
> >would like to be able to use my PC to do it. It isn't necessary to
use
> >top of the line but I am interested in the advantages.
> >
> >If anyone could point me in the right direction i would appreciate
it
> >very much. It lookedlike this wpould be the right place to ask.
Are
> >there any other groups or forums where I am likely to find this
> >information?
> >
> >TIA
> >
> >Carl
>
> Get a little experience BEFORE you spend a lot of money.
> If you're using a Windows platform, try n-Track Studio. I've used it
> for a lot of projects, and the support from its creator has been
> excellent.
> http://www.fasoft.com/
> It doesn't have all the features of ProTools, but it may have all the
> features you need.
> Mike T.


I'll third the vote for n-track studio.

Mark
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 8:27:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 3 Jan 2005 05:39:00 -0800, "Carl Tuba" <CarlTuba@juno.com> wrote:

>Hello:
>I am looking to buy multi-track sound editing software. I would like to
>make some home recordings with voices, midi, and acoustic instruments.
>I dont have any experience with this software. The last time I did any
>recording like this I was using a Fostex 4 track analog machine. I
>would like to be able to use my PC to do it. It isn't necessary to use
>top of the line but I am interested in the advantages.
>
>If anyone could point me in the right direction i would appreciate it
>very much. It lookedlike this wpould be the right place to ask. Are
>there any other groups or forums where I am likely to find this
>information?
>
>TIA
>
>Carl

Get a little experience BEFORE you spend a lot of money.
If you're using a Windows platform, try n-Track Studio. I've used it
for a lot of projects, and the support from its creator has been
excellent.
http://www.fasoft.com/
It doesn't have all the features of ProTools, but it may have all the
features you need.
Mike T.
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 9:58:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Carl Tuba wrote:

> If anyone could point me in the right direction i would appreciate
> it very much. It lookedlike this wpould be the right place to ask.
> Are there any other groups or forums where I am likely to find this
> information?

alt.music.home-studio and alt.music.4-track ....

> Carl


Kind regards

Peter Larsen

--
*******************************************
* My site is at: http://www.muyiovatki.dk *
*******************************************
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 2:46:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> Another good buy is Music Studio from Magix.

I can't comment on that one, but "Audio Cleaning Lab 2005" and "Movies
on CD and DVD 2005", both at DKK 249 over the counter here in
Copenhagen, Denmark, are both very solid value for money, and "movies"
is an excellent replacement of the software that came with a budget TV
card allowing it to make recordigns that are good and have good sound.
Based on the value for money ratio of those two, and on the good sound
of what they do, I can but second that suggestion. Both have a dumbified
initial interface, but the bonnet will open, they are not just dumbified
and their wizards seem to be kinda OK'ïsh.

Audio Cleaning Lab even has (untested) Dolby playback emulation and "eq
to sound like example", two facilities that people have been asking for
and a very well sounding multiband compressor for when less dynamics is
more. Ah well ... maxes out at 48 kHz sampling frequency and doesn't
know what a 32 bit file is, at the over the counter price, it is OK, to
some it may be a limitation, if so: get something else. For many users
it will be a valid replacement lil' swiss army knife now that CE2k no
longer is there for newcomers.

> http://site.magix.net/index.php?id=411

> And if you're not committed to learning to use your computer for this,
> you might look into many of the current digital hard-disk based
> versions of the 4-track cassette recorder/mixer that you've used in
> the past. These run from 4 to 24 tracks and from just a couple of
> hundred bucks up to a couple of thousand. But they're very
> straightforward to use and if you're more interested in recording
> music than learning about computers, it might be a good way to go.

Yamaha AWG16 and various Fostex contraptions are good examples of such
products, agreed. One of my aquaintances is a very happy owner of an
AWG16, based on fiddling with it for a short time it appears to sound OK
at its price and to be very useful.

Your mileage may vary. Exact suggestions, rather than general ones,
necessitate a clearer defined question.

> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)


Kind regards

Peter Larsen

--
*******************************************
* My site is at: http://www.muyiovatki.dk *
*******************************************
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:16:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks so much for all the great suggestions. You guys are an
certainly an example of what is great about usenet. I'll keep checking
this topic and let all y'all know what I eventually wind up doing..
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 4:22:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 3 Jan 2005 05:39:00 -0800, "Carl Tuba" <CarlTuba@juno.com> wrote:

>Hello:
>I am looking to buy multi-track sound editing software. I would like to
>make some home recordings with voices, midi, and acoustic instruments.
>I dont have any experience with this software. The last time I did any
>recording like this I was using a Fostex 4 track analog machine. I
>would like to be able to use my PC to do it. It isn't necessary to use
>top of the line but I am interested in the advantages.
>
>If anyone could point me in the right direction i would appreciate it
>very much. It lookedlike this wpould be the right place to ask. Are
>there any other groups or forums where I am likely to find this
>information?
>
>TIA
>
>Carl

There are a lot of different programs available for multitrack work.
Each will have pro's and con's.Pro Tools seems to be the standard for
a multitude of studios, but there are many other programs that would
fit the bill.I use Nuendo, Cubase, Pro tools, Logic audio, and
Samplitude, depending on what the needs are for a project.
They all are capable programs.Logic is the most difficult to learn,
but offers a lot of midi functionality. It lacks a little in mixing
capabilities.Pro tools would assure a broader user base, and also
allow you to take projects into bigger studios more easily.You may
want to try the free Pro Tools version from the digidesign website.
It would give you an idea of the capabilities of modern mulittrack
audio applications.Once you learn one of these programs, the other are
similar enough to learn to use them quickly.It basically comes down to
user preference once you try a few of them.Whatever suits your
recording, composing style is what you will end up using more often
than not. I recommend trying demos of the various programs available,
and settle on one that you like best.

Randall
!