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Cooledit pro. frequencies

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Anonymous
January 4, 2005 8:18:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

After I record my voice, how can I change the frequency of the recording?
Example, make it 17 Khz?

Bob
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 8:18:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1104851880.280041@athnrd02> bobptz@yahoo.gr writes:

> After I record my voice, how can I change the frequency of the recording?
> Example, make it 17 Khz?

That's not an example that I can understand.

Do you want to remove the original pitch coming from your vocal cords
and replace it with a single frequency? Why 17 kHz? Do you want to
talk to your dog?

Or do you simply want to change the pitch of your voice? Or do you
want to sound like a squeaky kid or little girl? Or what?


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 10:54:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

There is a pitch shifter in CoolEdit pro but it sounds like you wish to
shift more than a couple octives.

In the menu, "Edit", "Adjust sample rate".

This allows you to instantly adjust the sample rate rather than convert. A
recording at 44.1 "adjusted" to 88.2 kHz will double the pitch. By doing
multiple converts and adjusts you can easily move the pitch as far as you
wish.

Rich
"Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in message
news:1104851880.280041@athnrd02...
> After I record my voice, how can I change the frequency of the recording?
> Example, make it 17 Khz?
>
> Bob
>
Related resources
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:27:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

What I want to do is create for myself subliminal tapes. I want to record
my voice and then play it back at the frequency of above 10 Khz. Does this
makes sence now? Maybe I should ask for more instructions from the person
that gave me the idea.

Anyway, if you can direct me to the menu options that play with the
frequency, then maybe I can figure out how to do it.

I am sorry, I am very unfamiliar with the technology of sound editing. So I
cannot give more technical explanations of what I want to do. I was hoping
it is a simple conversion.

Thanks
Bob
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:41:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Maybe this will help more clarify what I want to do:
"A silent communications system in which nonaural carriers, in the very low
or very high audio-frequency range or in the adjacent ultrasonic frequency
spectrum are amplitude- or frequency-modulated with the desired intelligence
and propagated acoustically or vibrationally, for inducement into the brain,
typically through the use of loudspeakers, earphones, or piezoelectric
transducers."
http://www.bariumblues.com/resonance.htm
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:41:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 01:41:15 -0800, Bob Pit wrote:

> Maybe this will help more clarify what I want to do:
> "A silent communications system in which nonaural carriers, in the very low
> or very high audio-frequency range or in the adjacent ultrasonic frequency
> spectrum are amplitude- or frequency-modulated with the desired intelligence
> and propagated acoustically or vibrationally, for inducement into the brain,
> typically through the use of loudspeakers, earphones, or piezoelectric
> transducers."
> http://www.bariumblues.com/resonance.htm

From what I understand from that link, they are talking about inducing
brain wave patterns, by recording one persons with an ECG and playing
them back to another. I don't think speech is involved, and doubt it works.

German scientists tried something along the same lines in the second world
war, exposing people to dangerously strong oscillating magnetic fields to
create currents in the brain itself. Didn't work for them either, though
it cannot be denied it would have had an effect.

I've seen programs that attempt something a little like this with much
lower audio frequencies to create alpha and theta waves...
http://www.sonicspot.com/brainwavegenerator/brainwavege...

Watch out with those very high frequencies, it's hard to tell how loud
they are, and you can do some real damage to your ears.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:41:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 5 Jan 2005 01:41:15 -0800, "Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote:

>http://www.bariumblues.com/resonance.htm

Don't get your hopes up. Girls will still only like you
if you have money.

Chris Hornbeck
"They'd meet at the Tout Va Bien, a cafe just off the highway."
-JLG, _Bande a part_, 1964
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 6:09:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I am familiar with programs like BrainWaveGenerator. This is not what I
want.

I want to record my voice and then play it back in different frequencies.
Anybody knows how to do this in CoolEdit pro?

>>>
Watch out with those very high frequencies, it's hard to tell how loud they
are, and you can do some real damage to your ears.
<<<
I need some more info on this.

Thanks
Bob
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 6:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Like I described earlier and done with CoolEdit.
Note the 25k to 40k feeding bat brought down to audible.
Even the echo is maintained.

I have brought up sonic booms in a similar fashion but they are much less
interesting.

Do you want to hear the starship engaging the warp drive, now that is pretty
neat. But it is still being withheld at request of the galactic court.

400 kb download at:
http://home.comcast.net/~richpeet/bat.mp3

Rich

"Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in message
news:1104887374.191465@athnrd02...
>I am familiar with programs like BrainWaveGenerator. This is not what I
>want.
>
> I want to record my voice and then play it back in different frequencies.
> Anybody knows how to do this in CoolEdit pro?
>
>>>>
> Watch out with those very high frequencies, it's hard to tell how loud
> they are, and you can do some real damage to your ears.
> <<<
> I need some more info on this.
>
> Thanks
> Bob
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 6:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 03:09:43 -0800, Bob Pit wrote:

> I am familiar with programs like BrainWaveGenerator. This is not what I
> want.
>
> I want to record my voice and then play it back in different frequencies.
> Anybody knows how to do this in CoolEdit pro?

Record your voice normally then pitch shift it up. Keep doing the shift
till it's high enough. Perhaps try lower quality settings if there are
any, as the ones designed to create less artifacts sometimes have the
opposite effect with big shifts.

Also, a bode frequency shifter and then high passing the result might be fun.

If you really want to get deep into this kind of thing, download jmax
(it's free) and build a vocoder or modify an existing patch. Connect and
mix the lower bands to just some of higher ones, and use band passed noise
+ a high frequency tone as the carrier. This would let you be more
specific about the frequency. Might make it unintelligable, but I don't
know how you'd tell. Perhaps try it lower first to check.

>
>>>>
> Watch out with those very high frequencies, it's hard to tell how loud they
> are, and you can do some real damage to your ears.
> <<<
> I need some more info on this.

Just be careful, especially listening to just high frequency sine waves on
headphones.

>
> Thanks
> Bob
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 6:09:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 01:31:45 +0000, Rich Peet wrote:

> Like I described earlier and done with CoolEdit.
> Note the 25k to 40k feeding bat brought down to audible.
> Even the echo is maintained.
>
> I have brought up sonic booms in a similar fashion but they are much less
> interesting.
>
> Do you want to hear the starship engaging the warp drive, now that is pretty
> neat. But it is still being withheld at request of the galactic court.
>
> 400 kb download at:
> http://home.comcast.net/~richpeet/bat.mp3
>
> Rich

Nice slowed bat noises. What did you record them with?
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 6:09:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Nice slowed bat noises. What did you record them with?

An antique MKH-110 rf mic
A current RME Multiface A/D
A new RME Quadmic Pre.

But the starship was done on a consumer minidisc.
Rich
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 6:34:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Human ear is most sensitive around 1000KHz - 4000KHz and deeply goes down
after this. Most people dont hear nothing at 17KHz and its difficult to
adjust levels if you dont hear it.

..jukka

"Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in message
news:1104887374.191465@athnrd02...
> I am familiar with programs like BrainWaveGenerator. This is not what I
> want.
>
> I want to record my voice and then play it back in different frequencies.
> Anybody knows how to do this in CoolEdit pro?
>
> >>>
> Watch out with those very high frequencies, it's hard to tell how loud
they
> are, and you can do some real damage to your ears.
> <<<
> I need some more info on this.
>
> Thanks
> Bob
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 7:51:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>>>>
Record your voice normally then pitch shift it up. Keep doing the shift till
it's high enough. Perhaps try lower quality settings if there are any, as
the ones designed to create less artifacts sometimes have the opposite
effect with big shifts.
<<<<<
I was hoping for simple menu instructions. Guys, I am not familiar with
these stuff, I cannot follow them. I do not know the following concepts:
"pitch shift it up"
"lower quality settings "
"artifacts"

I did check out JMax. No, it sounds even more complicated than CoolEdit. I
do not need to go that deep.

Bob
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 7:51:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in news:1104893453.844715@athnrd02:

> I was hoping for simple menu instructions. Guys, I am not familiar
> with these stuff, I cannot follow them.
Record your voice.

On the Effects menu, pick Time/Pitch, then Stretch

1) Stretching mode: Pitch shift (preserves tempo)
2) Slide stretch bar all the way to the left (higher pitch)
3) Click OK

Is it high enough? If not, repeat the above.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 10:48:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> How can I convert an entire segment to a
> frequency of 17 Khz? It cannot be done.

Correct.
You cannot convert a range of frequencies (300-3000)
to a single frequency without some system of
modulation. In which case there would still be the
sidebands to contend with.
Although, I must say, this is getting interesting ...
How will you 'send' the signal ? Speaker/phones ?
Or some kind of antenae ?

rd
(scratching head)
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 11:05:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bob Pit"
>
> After I record my voice, how can I change the frequency of the recording?
> Example, make it 17 Khz?
>


** Planninng on conversing with bats ??





............ Phil
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 11:05:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <340eo4F46mmetU1@individual.net>,
"Phil Allison" <philallison@tpg.com.au> wrote:

> "Bob Pit"
> >
> > After I record my voice, how can I change the frequency of the recording?
> > Example, make it 17 Khz?
> >
>
>
> ** Planninng on conversing with bats ??
>

He said 17K, not 27K. 17K is perfectly within some humans' hearing.
Whether or not I'd be able to understand a voice at that pitch is
another story though, considering most formants would end up above
audibility.

-Todd
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 1:24:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Quite possibly one of the strangest posts I've ever seen here.


<< "Bob Pit" bobptz@yahoo.gr >>

<< After I record my voice, how can I change the frequency of the recording?
Example, make it 17 Khz?









>>

Anonymous
January 5, 2005 1:29:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> On the Effects menu, pick Time/Pitch, then Stretch
>
> 1) Stretching mode: Pitch shift (preserves tempo)
> 2) Slide stretch bar all the way to the left (higher pitch)
> 3) Click OK

I tried it and it works. I think this is what I need.

Now my problem is that I want to convert my voice to a specific frequency
(let's say 14 Khz). The way you told me I do not know how much high it
goes. (Is there a way to tell?).

They told me that what I want to do has to do with "SilentSounds" and the
"Tomatis Effects". Looking into it right now. I will get back.

Thanks
Bob



"Carey Carlan" <gulfjoe@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xns95D4EB7C62DAgulfjoehotmailcom@207.69.189.191...
>
> "Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in news:1104893453.844715@athnrd02:
>
>> I was hoping for simple menu instructions. Guys, I am not familiar
>> with these stuff, I cannot follow them.
> Record your voice.
>
> On the Effects menu, pick Time/Pitch, then Stretch
>
> 1) Stretching mode: Pitch shift (preserves tempo)
> 2) Slide stretch bar all the way to the left (higher pitch)
> 3) Click OK
>
> Is it high enough? If not, repeat the above.
>
>
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 1:29:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in message
news:1104913773.422364@athnrd02...
>> On the Effects menu, pick Time/Pitch, then Stretch
>>
>> 1) Stretching mode: Pitch shift (preserves tempo)
>> 2) Slide stretch bar all the way to the left (higher pitch)
>> 3) Click OK
>
> I tried it and it works. I think this is what I need.
>
> Now my problem is that I want to convert my voice to a specific
> frequency (let's say 14 Khz). The way you told me I do not know how
> much high it goes. (Is there a way to tell?).

CoolEdit provides an easy way to measure the resulting WAV
file to show the frequency of any segment.

> They told me that what I want to do has to do with "SilentSounds" and
> the "Tomatis Effects". Looking into it right now. I will get back.

Are you sure you want to increase the baseband signal to this
high frequency? Or are you looking to MODULATE the HF
signal with the speech? (Not that I believe this is anything
but snake-oil hokum.)
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 1:29:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1104913773.422364@athnrd02> bobptz@yahoo.gr writes:

> I tried it and it works. I think this is what I need.
>
> Now my problem is that I want to convert my voice to a specific frequency
> (let's say 14 Khz). The way you told me I do not know how much high it
> goes. (Is there a way to tell?).


Do you know how someone speaking with an artificial larynx (an old
one, maybe they make polyphonic ones now) sounds? The voice is at a
single pitch, and it's fairly low and buzzy. Is this what you're
trying to do with your voice, only at a high frequency?

If that's what you want, the device you're looking for is called a
vocoder, which allows you to modulate another source with the
amplitude component of the voice. Put your voice into one input and a
14 kHz sine wave into the other input and you'll have what you're
looking for.

There are some software vocoders, but I don't know how well they work,
or even if they're real vocoders. Sennheiser made a hardware one, but
they're rare as hen's teeth and sell for unconscionable amounts of
money when you can find one.

While I don't know whether you can make your own biological hardware
work efficiently at that high a frequency, you might try the "talking
guitar" trick. Mount a loudspeaker in a sealed box, attach a tube to
it, then stick the tube in your mouth. Then play a tone into the
loudspeaker and mouth the words. Record what comes out, using a
microphone. Your speech will have the pitch of the tone. I believe
that Pete Drake, a steel guitar player, first used this trick using
his guitar to modulate his voice around 1960 (+/- 5 years for the
benefit of the correctors-by-Google). Peter Frampton, I think, brought
the effect back in the '80's.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 3:12:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Todd Lipcon"
> "Phil Allison"
>> "Bob Pit"
>> >
>> > After I record my voice, how can I change the frequency of the
>> > recording?
>> > Example, make it 17 Khz?
>> >
>>
>> ** Planning on conversing with bats ??
>>
>
> He said 17K, not 27K. 17K is perfectly within some humans' hearing.


** Add on a few kHz for the speech itself gives 21 kHz - the sound would
not be audible or recognisable as speech by anyone. A bat might get it -
hence my question.




............ Phil
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:09:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bob Pit"
>I am familiar with programs like BrainWaveGenerator. This is not what I
>want.
>
> I want to record my voice and then play it back in different frequencies.


** The question is not answerable as YOU have no idea what you are asking
for. Speech has a wide range of frequencies - from 70 Hz to 15 Khz at
least. A telephone works from 300 Hz to 3500 Hz - the minimum for voice
recognition.

If you shift the phone voice range up then it still has the wide range of
frequencies - from 600Hz to 7000Hz if pitch shifted by a factor of 2
*OR* from 3300Hz to 6500 Hz if frequency shifted by 3000 Hz

The whole idea is utterly bonkers in the first place and NOTHING to do with
pro audio.





............... Phil
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:09:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Your answer makes sence to me. OK, I will ask for better instructions and I
will get back.

Thanks
Bob



> ** The question is not answerable as YOU have no idea what you are asking
> for. Speech has a wide range of frequencies - from 70 Hz to 15 Khz at
> least. A telephone works from 300 Hz to 3500 Hz - the minimum for
> voice recognition.
>
> If you shift the phone voice range up then it still has the wide range of
> frequencies - from 600Hz to 7000Hz if pitch shifted by a factor of 2
> *OR* from 3300Hz to 6500 Hz if frequency shifted by 3000 Hz
>
> The whole idea is utterly bonkers in the first place and NOTHING to do
> with pro audio.
>
>
>
>
>
> .............. Phil
>
>
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:09:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Phil Allison" <philallison@tpg.com.au> wrote in message
news:3410i8F45djncU1@individual.net...
>
600Hz to 7000Hz if pitch shifted by a factor of 2
> *OR* from 3300Hz to 6500 Hz if frequency shifted by 3000 Hz
>
> The whole idea is utterly bonkers in the first place and NOTHING to do
with
> pro audio.
>
The bat audio I posted was sold as a product.

Rich
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:58:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in news:1104913773.422364@athnrd02:

>> On the Effects menu, pick Time/Pitch, then Stretch
>>
>> 1) Stretching mode: Pitch shift (preserves tempo)
>> 2) Slide stretch bar all the way to the left (higher pitch)
>> 3) Click OK
>
> I tried it and it works. I think this is what I need.
>
> Now my problem is that I want to convert my voice to a specific
> frequency (let's say 14 Khz). The way you told me I do not know how
> much high it goes. (Is there a way to tell?).

Before you start stretching, apply a bandpass filter to your recording to
limit it to a reasonable range of spoken frequencies (say 200 Hz to 7000
Hz):

Effects > FIlters > Scientific Filters
Type 200 into the Cutoff field, and 7000 into the High Cutoff field and
press OK.

After pitch shifting, you can look at the spectrum (Analyze > Frequency
Analysis) to see how your center frequency moved.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 7:29:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Rich Peet"
> "Phil Allison"
>>
> 600Hz to 7000Hz if pitch shifted by a factor of 2
>> *OR* from 3300Hz to 6500 Hz if frequency shifted by 3000 Hz
>>
>> The whole idea is utterly bonkers in the first place and NOTHING to do
> with
>> pro audio.
>>
> The bat audio I posted was sold as a product.
>


** Sure - but that is not the "idea" the OP has in mind.

He is into subliminal mind control !!!!




.............. Phil
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 8:04:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>>>
CoolEdit provides an easy way to measure the resulting WAV file to show the
frequency of any segment.
<<<
You mean the Analyze -> Show FrequencyAnalysis, right? Every single point
has many different frequencies, right? This is what I do not understand.
How can I convert an entire segment to a frequency of 17 Khz? It cannot be
done. And after searching for SilentSounds, I still did not figure out what
the others are doing.

>>>
Are you sure you want to increase the baseband signal to this high
frequency? Or are you looking to MODULATE the HF signal with the speech?
(Not that I believe this is anything but snake-oil hokum.)
<<<
I do not know what these mean. I do not know "baseband signal", "HF signal"
or how to modulate signals.

Bob





"Richard Crowley" <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote in message
news:10tn9vu1gndchaa@corp.supernews.com...
>
>
> "Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in message
> news:1104913773.422364@athnrd02...
>>> On the Effects menu, pick Time/Pitch, then Stretch
>>>
>>> 1) Stretching mode: Pitch shift (preserves tempo)
>>> 2) Slide stretch bar all the way to the left (higher pitch)
>>> 3) Click OK
>>
>> I tried it and it works. I think this is what I need.
>>
>> Now my problem is that I want to convert my voice to a specific frequency
>> (let's say 14 Khz). The way you told me I do not know how much high it
>> goes. (Is there a way to tell?).
>
> CoolEdit provides an easy way to measure the resulting WAV
> file to show the frequency of any segment.
>
>> They told me that what I want to do has to do with "SilentSounds" and the
>> "Tomatis Effects". Looking into it right now. I will get back.
>
> Are you sure you want to increase the baseband signal to this
> high frequency? Or are you looking to MODULATE the HF
> signal with the speech? (Not that I believe this is anything
> but snake-oil hokum.)
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 8:06:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>>>>
Effects > FIlters > Scientific Filters Type 200 into the Cutoff field, and
7000 into the High Cutoff field and press OK.
<<<<
OK, got that.

>>>
After pitch shifting, you can look at the spectrum (Analyze > Frequency
Analysis) to see how your center frequency moved.
<<<
Sorry, what is "center frequency"?

Bob




"Carey Carlan" <gulfjoe@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xns95D55B60AB9B4gulfjoehotmailcom@207.69.189.191...
>
> "Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in news:1104913773.422364@athnrd02:
>
>>> On the Effects menu, pick Time/Pitch, then Stretch
>>>
>>> 1) Stretching mode: Pitch shift (preserves tempo)
>>> 2) Slide stretch bar all the way to the left (higher pitch)
>>> 3) Click OK
>>
>> I tried it and it works. I think this is what I need.
>>
>> Now my problem is that I want to convert my voice to a specific
>> frequency (let's say 14 Khz). The way you told me I do not know how
>> much high it goes. (Is there a way to tell?).
>
> Before you start stretching, apply a bandpass filter to your recording to
> limit it to a reasonable range of spoken frequencies (say 200 Hz to 7000
> Hz):
>
> Effects > FIlters > Scientific Filters
> Type 200 into the Cutoff field, and 7000 into the High Cutoff field and
> press OK.
>
> After pitch shifting, you can look at the spectrum (Analyze > Frequency
> Analysis) to see how your center frequency moved.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 11:09:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>> Personally, I find software modular synths essential for all my
ultrasonic
>> subliminal mind control requirements

> Can you tell me how do you do these?

Cool Edit doesn't handle VST directly, only through a "wrapper".
Even then I think a soft-synth would require you to upgrade to
Adobe Audition 1.5 to use native VST synth.

good luck
rd
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 12:49:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>>>
How will you 'send' the signal ? Speaker/phones ? Or some kind of antenae ?
<<<
I will play it back from either regular speakers or even better through
headphones, along with binural Brainwave entrainment sounds.

Bob
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 12:51:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

No, what I want to do can be done easily through software. The problem is I
don't know the technical details. This is why I asked you guys.

Bob
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 2:03:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 09:55:44 -0500, Mike Rivers wrote:

>
> In article <1104913773.422364@athnrd02> bobptz@yahoo.gr writes:
>
>> I tried it and it works. I think this is what I need.
>>
>> Now my problem is that I want to convert my voice to a specific frequency
>> (let's say 14 Khz). The way you told me I do not know how much high it
>> goes. (Is there a way to tell?).
>
>
> Do you know how someone speaking with an artificial larynx (an old
> one, maybe they make polyphonic ones now) sounds? The voice is at a
> single pitch, and it's fairly low and buzzy. Is this what you're
> trying to do with your voice, only at a high frequency?
>
> If that's what you want, the device you're looking for is called a
> vocoder, which allows you to modulate another source with the
> amplitude component of the voice. Put your voice into one input and a
> 14 kHz sine wave into the other input and you'll have what you're
> looking for.

That probably won't work with a conventional vocoder, as the 14k will not
be present enough in the modulator (the original speech). Hence a vocoder
that allows cross patching of bands is required.

Personally, I find software modular synths essential for all my ultrasonic
subliminal mind control requirements.

>
> There are some software vocoders, but I don't know how well they work,
> or even if they're real vocoders. Sennheiser made a hardware one, but
> they're rare as hen's teeth and sell for unconscionable amounts of money
> when you can find one.

I'd kill for one of those. Well, maim at least.
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 7:12:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>>>
Personally, I find software modular synths essential for all my ultrasonic
subliminal mind control requirements.
<<<
Can you tell me how do you do these?

Bob



"philicorda" <philicorda@localhost.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.01.06.23.04.35.141967@localhost.com...
>
> On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 09:55:44 -0500, Mike Rivers wrote:
>
>>
>> In article <1104913773.422364@athnrd02> bobptz@yahoo.gr writes:
>>
>>> I tried it and it works. I think this is what I need.
>>>
>>> Now my problem is that I want to convert my voice to a specific
>>> frequency
>>> (let's say 14 Khz). The way you told me I do not know how much high it
>>> goes. (Is there a way to tell?).
>>
>>
>> Do you know how someone speaking with an artificial larynx (an old
>> one, maybe they make polyphonic ones now) sounds? The voice is at a
>> single pitch, and it's fairly low and buzzy. Is this what you're
>> trying to do with your voice, only at a high frequency?
>>
>> If that's what you want, the device you're looking for is called a
>> vocoder, which allows you to modulate another source with the
>> amplitude component of the voice. Put your voice into one input and a
>> 14 kHz sine wave into the other input and you'll have what you're
>> looking for.
>
> That probably won't work with a conventional vocoder, as the 14k will not
> be present enough in the modulator (the original speech). Hence a vocoder
> that allows cross patching of bands is required.
>
> Personally, I find software modular synths essential for all my ultrasonic
> subliminal mind control requirements.
>
>>
>> There are some software vocoders, but I don't know how well they work,
>> or even if they're real vocoders. Sennheiser made a hardware one, but
>> they're rare as hen's teeth and sell for unconscionable amounts of money
>> when you can find one.
>
> I'd kill for one of those. Well, maim at least.
>
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 11:21:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bob Pit" <bobptz@yahoo.gr> wrote in message
news:1104977566.825276@athnrd02...
>>>>
> Personally, I find software modular synths essential for all my ultrasonic
> subliminal mind control requirements.
> <<<
> Can you tell me how do you do these?
>
> Bob

Better read record the instructions of how to do it as a subliminal
message..
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 12:41:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
>
> While I don't know whether you can make your own biological hardware
> work efficiently at that high a frequency, you might try the "talking
> guitar" trick. Mount a loudspeaker in a sealed box, attach a tube to
> it, then stick the tube in your mouth. Then play a tone into the
> loudspeaker and mouth the words. Record what comes out, using a
> microphone. Your speech will have the pitch of the tone. I believe
> that Pete Drake, a steel guitar player, first used this trick using
> his guitar to modulate his voice around 1960 (+/- 5 years for the
> benefit of the correctors-by-Google). Peter Frampton, I think,
brought
> the effect back in the '80's.
>

Joe Walsh in 1973. "Rocky Mountain Way"

rd
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 1:38:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1105335716.513465.29760@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com> annonn@juno.com writes:

> > you might try the "talking
> > guitar" trick.

> Joe Walsh in 1973. "Rocky Mountain Way"

> > Pete Drake, a steel guitar player, first used this trick using
> > his guitar to modulate his voice around 1960

Thinking harder, it was more likely Alvino Rey who first used this on
a recording, predating Pete Drake by about 10 years.



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