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XLR to stereo

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January 6, 2005 9:24:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? Thanks.

More about : xlr stereo

Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:24:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
>cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
>1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? Thanks.

Markertek can make one if they don't stock it.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:24:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 18:24:26 GMT, chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:

>I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
>cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
>1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? <snip>

You can't. Each XLR represents a tip, ring and sleeve. Assuming the
sleeves are from the same ground, now you're down to five conductors.
You're trying to go from balanced to unbalanced. Doesn't work that
way.

dB
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Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:24:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It's not an ideal scenario but it happens all of the time when
recording into a standard pc audio card, mini disc recorder, or other
device. If you do this all of the time in a money making business you
really should purchase a submixer. Otherwise...

The XLR balanced signal can be transformed to 1/4 unbalanced signal
with a transformer. It looks like a large bullet or a small missile
and sells for under $15. I guess two would be under $30.

Then, if you go by the book, you need a line mixer to mix your two
signals. They are surprisingly expensive these days so the heck with
that. In your case you can probably just find a y-splitter. Usually
the split jacks are sold with red on one side and black on the other
side to show left and right.

Don't bother soldering (or having someone else solder) a cable that
simply drops XLR down to 1/4. You need the transformer to correct the
impedence of the signal.

-Tom
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:45:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"chris" wrote ...
>I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking
> for a cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels
> to a single stereo 1/8" (or 1/4") jack.

What does that mean?

Are you saying that you have a stereo mic with a stereo 1/8"
connectors that you want to connect to the XLR inputs of two
preamps?

Or are you saying that you want to take the XLR ouputs of two
preamps and feed some device that wants 1/8" stereo mini-
phone jack?

Or are you saying that you have two XLR microphones that
you want to feed into a 1/8" mini-phone input?

There are commercial sources of everything from simple
cable adapters to full transformer-balanced interfaces that
would meet most of these combinations (and others).

Or what?

> Where can I find it? Thanks.

If you can describe more accurately what you need, it will
be easier to suggest sources.
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 11:43:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"chris" <someone@somewhere.net> wrote in message
news:unfDd.2134$%e1.1176@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net

> I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
> cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single
> stereo 1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? Thanks.

I understand your situation to be one where you have a Mic preamp with
balanced outputs on XLR connectors, and an audio interface with a 1/8"
stereo mini headphone jack line level input.

Either you make your own cable, have someone like Markertek make it for you,
or assemble a composite cable of your own.

If you chose the last alternative, buy a standard dual-RCA plug to 1/8" plug
adaptor cable,

http://www.minidisc.org/soundprofessionals/cables/img/s...

or get this adaptor that does it all in one little connector:

http://www.midi-classics.com/c/c24184.htm

and two XLR to RCA adaptors.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=produ...

http://store.qualityelectronics.net/hogxrcafxlrf.html
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 2:29:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

FWIW - going from a nice preamp and just using unbalanced cables to
plug it into a standard pc card will sound like poo-poo. Kinda defeats
the purpose of hvaing a nice preamp to begin with. Get an upgraded
interface with XLR inputs (assuming you're going into a computer -
sounds like it - otherwise I have no idea why you'd want to do what
you're looking to do) and keep the signal path clean and clear. Don't
just use some cheap cable adapter - especially to go from XLR to RCA -
XLR is balanced - the RCA is NOT. The signals won't match, and then
you'll be scratching your head wondering why the hell your recordings
have so much noise - even with a "nice" preamp. Good luck!

chris wrote:
> Arny Krueger wrote:
> > "chris" <someone@somewhere.net> wrote in message
> > news:unfDd.2134$%e1.1176@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net
> >
> >
> >>I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
> >>cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single
> >>stereo 1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? Thanks.
> >
> >
> > I understand your situation to be one where you have a Mic preamp
with
> > balanced outputs on XLR connectors, and an audio interface with a
1/8"
> > stereo mini headphone jack line level input.
> >
> > Either you make your own cable, have someone like Markertek make it
for you,
> > or assemble a composite cable of your own.
> >
> > If you chose the last alternative, buy a standard dual-RCA plug to
1/8" plug
> > adaptor cable,
> >
> > http://www.minidisc.org/soundprofessionals/cables/img/s...
> >
> > or get this adaptor that does it all in one little connector:
> >
> > http://www.midi-classics.com/c/c24184.htm
> >
> > and two XLR to RCA adaptors.
> >
> >
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=produ...
> >
> > http://store.qualityelectronics.net/hogxrcafxlrf.html
>
> Thank you very much. The Hosa GXF-132 is exactly what I am looking
for.
> I didn't know there is such a thing. It saves my trouble to having to
> add a line mixer.
January 7, 2005 3:22:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

DeserTBoB wrote:
> On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 18:24:26 GMT, chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>
>
>>I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
>>cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
>>1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? <snip>
>
>
> You can't. Each XLR represents a tip, ring and sleeve. Assuming the
> sleeves are from the same ground, now you're down to five conductors.
> You're trying to go from balanced to unbalanced. Doesn't work that
> way.
>
> dB


Okay. Then what mixer do I need that can combine 2 XLR channels from 2
mikes to a single stereo jack? One that is cheap but good quality. Mic
preamp quality isn't important because I have a reasonably good one. Thanks.
January 7, 2005 6:33:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Arny Krueger wrote:
> "chris" <someone@somewhere.net> wrote in message
> news:unfDd.2134$%e1.1176@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net
>
>
>>I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
>>cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single
>>stereo 1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? Thanks.
>
>
> I understand your situation to be one where you have a Mic preamp with
> balanced outputs on XLR connectors, and an audio interface with a 1/8"
> stereo mini headphone jack line level input.
>
> Either you make your own cable, have someone like Markertek make it for you,
> or assemble a composite cable of your own.
>
> If you chose the last alternative, buy a standard dual-RCA plug to 1/8" plug
> adaptor cable,
>
> http://www.minidisc.org/soundprofessionals/cables/img/s...
>
> or get this adaptor that does it all in one little connector:
>
> http://www.midi-classics.com/c/c24184.htm
>
> and two XLR to RCA adaptors.
>
> http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=produ...
>
> http://store.qualityelectronics.net/hogxrcafxlrf.html

Thank you very much. The Hosa GXF-132 is exactly what I am looking for.
I didn't know there is such a thing. It saves my trouble to having to
add a line mixer.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 9:52:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <06hrt0tckf1msbv702ep142fpbnomhi85s@4ax.com> desertb@rglobal.net writes:

>
> >I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
> >cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
> >1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? <snip>
>
> You can't. Each XLR represents a tip, ring and sleeve. Assuming the
> sleeves are from the same ground, now you're down to five conductors.
> You're trying to go from balanced to unbalanced. Doesn't work that
> way.

Oh, pfiddle!

While it's not the perfect interface, it's certainly possible to
connect a stereo mic's two channels on a 1/4" or 1/8" plug to two
XLRs. Connect the sleeve to Pins 1 and 3 of both XLRs, the tip to Pin
2 of one XLR, and the ring to the Pin 2 of the other XLR. This isn't
likely to be an adapter that can be bought off the rack, however
anyone with the parts and some soldering skill can make it. Much
cheaper than buying a mixer.

Leave the phantom power off. Hopefully this isn't one of those
"plug-in power" mics.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 10:07:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

http://www.hosatech.com/hosa/products/mit_transformers....

Here's what Hosa says:

"To run a low-impedance XLR terminated line (like a pro microphone)
into a high-impedance ¼" phone input (like a guitar-amp input), it's
often necessary to use a line matching transformer like our MIT-435 or
MIT-176. The MIT-129 is for impedance matching of a high impedance ¼"
phone equipped source (like an electric guitar) into a low-impedance
(mic-level) XLR type input."

The GXF-132 looks cool. Unfortunately, the description for the GXF-132
doesn't say anything about transformers. It just tells you how the
pins are wired.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 11:45:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks for the specs.
Your output is low impedance for both XLR and 1/4".

According to Whirlwind anything below 150 ohms is considered low
impedance.

http://www.whirlwindusa.com/tech03.html
http://www.alectrosystems.com/tips/audio_tips/audio_tip...

What is the impedance rating on the input of your recording device? If
it's a high impedance input you will need a direct box or a transformer
to get a good sounding audio signal.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 11:59:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <unfDd.2134$%e1.1176@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>, chris
<someone@somewhere.net> wrote:

> I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
> cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
> 1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? Thanks.

There are a bunch of adapters made for DV cameras (such as the Canon XL1)
for this purpose that may work for you; one is made by a company called
Beachtek.

--
Jedd Haas - Artist
http://www.gallerytungsten.com
http://www.epsno.com
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 1:35:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 08:59:11 -0600, jnh@epsno.com (Jedd Haas) wrote:
>
>There are a bunch of adapters made for DV cameras (such as the Canon XL1)
>for this purpose that may work for you; one is made by a company called
>Beachtek.

I tried one of these with a pair of 451s and was not impressed (wasn't
mine and didn't get a chance to look inside). I got a better sound by
just grounding one leg (after providing for phantom).

I found one of those female xlr's with a built in switch. After
removing the switch there was enough room for a mini 12v battery, a
pair of resistors and some tiny blocking caps. I use it for an on
camera mic. Works great, sounds great.


Frank /~ http://newmex.com/f10
@/
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 1:43:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 19:22:32 -0500, chris wrote
(in article <cDkDd.2401$%e1.2257@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>):

> DeserTBoB wrote:
>> On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 18:24:26 GMT, chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
>>> cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
>>> 1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? <snip>
>>
>>
>> You can't. Each XLR represents a tip, ring and sleeve. Assuming the
>> sleeves are from the same ground, now you're down to five conductors.
>> You're trying to go from balanced to unbalanced. Doesn't work that
>> way.
>>
>> dB
>
>
> Okay. Then what mixer do I need that can combine 2 XLR channels from 2
> mikes to a single stereo jack? One that is cheap but good quality. Mic
> preamp quality isn't important because I have a reasonably good one. Thanks.

Chris,

Let me confirm. You have balanced XLR outs and you want to pass that audio
into a single unbalanced stereo input to something like a MD recorder or
camcorder.


Here's how I have done that. Get a set of Hosa female XLR (Guitar Center
carries them) to male RCA cables. Get a y-adapter with two female RCA to one
mini TRS. Plug male RCA into female RCA. Done.

Regards,

Ty Ford


-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 3:00:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Tom Penharston" <thinkpersuasion@netscape.net> wrote in message
news:1105116303.424099.9970@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
> What is the impedance rating on the input of your recording device? If
> it's a high impedance input you will need a direct box or a transformer
> to get a good sounding audio signal.
>

Not so. You will have no problem driving a high impedance input with a low
impedance output. This is normal. You need no direct box or transformer.
Direct boxes are used for the reverse: driving a low impedance input by a
high impedance ourput.

Chris: Since you output device also has a 1/4" balanced output, read the
manual to determine if it will accept an unbalanced 1/4" plug inserted into
it without harm (many do). If so, there are also simple cables/adapters for
converting 1/4" unbalaced to either RCA and/or 1/8" connectors.

Again, you should not need transformers or direct boxes.

Mike Putrino
Mastering Engineer
Austin, TX
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 3:38:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
> Not so. You will have no problem driving a high impedance input with
a low
> impedance output. This is normal. You need no direct box or
transformer.
> Direct boxes are used for the reverse: driving a low impedance input
by a
> high impedance ourput.
>

Okay, he's right. This note on Shure's web talks about impedence
matching:
http://www.shure.com/support/technotes/app-impedance.ht...
I'm one hundred years behind the game!

Moving on, I used the exact same set-up last year with a Presonus Blue
tube and a Sony minidisc recorder. I couldn't use the full range of
the Blue Tube.

Preamps sound great when they are used properly. When you reduce the
function of the pre-amp to a level control you can be stuck with a much
thinner sound than the pre-amp is designed to provide.
January 7, 2005 5:07:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

StudioDude wrote:
> FWIW - going from a nice preamp and just using unbalanced cables to
> plug it into a standard pc card will sound like poo-poo. Kinda defeats
> the purpose of hvaing a nice preamp to begin with. Get an upgraded
> interface with XLR inputs (assuming you're going into a computer -
> sounds like it - otherwise I have no idea why you'd want to do what
> you're looking to do) and keep the signal path clean and clear. Don't
> just use some cheap cable adapter - especially to go from XLR to RCA -
> XLR is balanced - the RCA is NOT. The signals won't match, and then
> you'll be scratching your head wondering why the hell your recordings
> have so much noise - even with a "nice" preamp. Good luck!


It's going to a portable recorder. I think only desktop recorders have
balanced inputs. Maybe I am wrong but I can't afford those expensive DAT
recorders anyway. I am using two mikes so it's necessary to use a
2-channel mic preamp, and I think it ought to be _nicer_ than the one
built-in the recorder. The XLR to RCA adaptor is enough for me to get
started.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 5:07:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <yIwDd.155$KJ2.35@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net> someone@somewhere.net writes:

> It's going to a portable recorder. I think only desktop recorders have
> balanced inputs.

Not true, but perhaps so in your price range. But then, what desktop
recorders these days have mic inputs anyway?

> I am using two mikes so it's necessary to use a
> 2-channel mic preamp, and I think it ought to be _nicer_ than the one
> built-in the recorder. The XLR to RCA adaptor is enough for me to get
> started.

It's still not clear what it is that you need to do, but I guess you
got a solution. That you stated here that you are using two mics helps
clarify it, but from your initial message, I was unsure if:

- You had a stereo mic (or two mics) with a mini plug which you
wanted to adapt to XLR mic inputs on a preamp. (this is what I
assumed and answered)

- You had mics and a preamp with XLR connectors. You needed to adapt
the XLR outputs of the preamp to connect to the mini jack on your
recorder. (apparently this is what you need to do)



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
January 7, 2005 6:54:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Tom Penharston wrote:
> http://www.hosatech.com/hosa/products/mit_transformers....
>
> Here's what Hosa says:
>
> "To run a low-impedance XLR terminated line (like a pro microphone)
> into a high-impedance ¼" phone input (like a guitar-amp input), it's
> often necessary to use a line matching transformer like our MIT-435 or
> MIT-176. The MIT-129 is for impedance matching of a high impedance ¼"
> phone equipped source (like an electric guitar) into a low-impedance
> (mic-level) XLR type input."
>
> The GXF-132 looks cool. Unfortunately, the description for the GXF-132
> doesn't say anything about transformers. It just tells you how the
> pins are wired.


Here is spec of the mic preamp's audio out:
Connectors: XLR and 1/4" jack
Type: electronically servo-balanced output stage
Impedance: 60 Ohm balanced, 30 Ohms unbalanced
Maximum output level: +21dBu balanced and unbalanced

I am connect it to the portable recorder's line in.

There is no info about the recorder's line in jack. Would the GXF-132
damage the portable recorder?
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 6:54:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"chris" wrote
> Here is spec of the mic preamp's audio out:
> Connectors: XLR and 1/4" jack
> Type: electronically servo-balanced output stage
> Impedance: 60 Ohm balanced, 30 Ohms unbalanced
> Maximum output level: +21dBu balanced and unbalanced
>
> I am connect it to the portable recorder's line in.
>
> There is no info about the recorder's line in jack. Would
> the GXF-132 damage the portable recorder?

You didn't state what the "portable recorder" is, but just
guessing that any equipment with a 1/8" connector most
likely won't tolerate +21dBu of audio level. -10 is closer
to typical consumer "line level". IOW, you may have to
run the output from the preamps pretty low to avoid clipping
on the recorder inputs.

The adapter won't likely "damage" anything, but feeding +21
(or even +4) dBu into a consumer line-level wouldn't be
advisable IME.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 6:54:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>
>
>Here is spec of the mic preamp's audio out:
>Connectors: XLR and 1/4" jack
>Type: electronically servo-balanced output stage
>Impedance: 60 Ohm balanced, 30 Ohms unbalanced
>Maximum output level: +21dBu balanced and unbalanced

For the most part this isn't very meaningful, other than that you know
it's low-Z and balanced.

>I am connect it to the portable recorder's line in.
>
>There is no info about the recorder's line in jack. Would the GXF-132
>damage the portable recorder?

Not if it's just a straight-through cable, pin 3 on each XLR pulled to
the two hot pins on the 1/8 plug and pins 1 and 2 tied to shield.
(Or with 2 and 3 swapped if you are of that religion). God I hate those
1/8" plugs.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
January 7, 2005 7:44:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Ty Ford wrote:
> On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 19:22:32 -0500, chris wrote
> (in article <cDkDd.2401$%e1.2257@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>):
>
>
>>DeserTBoB wrote:
>>
>>>On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 18:24:26 GMT, chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
>>>>cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
>>>>1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? <snip>
>>>
>>>
>>>You can't. Each XLR represents a tip, ring and sleeve. Assuming the
>>>sleeves are from the same ground, now you're down to five conductors.
>>>You're trying to go from balanced to unbalanced. Doesn't work that
>>>way.
>>>
>>>dB
>>
>>
>>Okay. Then what mixer do I need that can combine 2 XLR channels from 2
>>mikes to a single stereo jack? One that is cheap but good quality. Mic
>>preamp quality isn't important because I have a reasonably good one. Thanks.
>
>
> Chris,
>
> Let me confirm. You have balanced XLR outs and you want to pass that audio
> into a single unbalanced stereo input to something like a MD recorder or
> camcorder.
>
>
> Here's how I have done that. Get a set of Hosa female XLR (Guitar Center
> carries them) to male RCA cables. Get a y-adapter with two female RCA to one
> mini TRS. Plug male RCA into female RCA. Done.
>
> Regards,
>
> Ty Ford
>
>
> -- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
> stuff are at www.tyford.com


Thanks. This is similar to Amy Krueger's suggestion. You guys are godsends.
January 7, 2005 7:53:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Tom Penharston wrote:
> Thanks for the specs.
> Your output is low impedance for both XLR and 1/4".
>
> According to Whirlwind anything below 150 ohms is considered low
> impedance.
>
> http://www.whirlwindusa.com/tech03.html
> http://www.alectrosystems.com/tips/audio_tips/audio_tip...
>
> What is the impedance rating on the input of your recording device? If
> it's a high impedance input you will need a direct box or a transformer
> to get a good sounding audio signal.


It's a typical Sony HiMD recorder which I can't find any info. It is
certainly a low impedance device but I don't know how low it is.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 9:27:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <B8zDd.226$KJ2.156@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net> someone@somewhere.net writes:

> It's a typical Sony HiMD recorder which I can't find any info. It is
> certainly a low impedance device but I don't know how low it is.

Finally we're getting close.

I connect preamps (and mixers) similar to yours to my Nomad Jukebox 3
by using a cable with a mini stereo plug on one end and a pair of RCA
plugs on the other. Then I use RCA-1/4" adapters on the RCA end of the
cable and plug them into the 1/4" output jacks of the preamp or mixer.

If the output is really balanced, and isn't some unusual configuration
that doesn't like to have one side of the signal grounded (which is
what will happen when you plug the 1/4" phone adapters into the output
jacks) it will work fine.

Be sure to watch the record level meter on your recorder. Also, don't
get yourself into the level situation where you have the record level
control on the recorder turned nearly all the way down in order to
keep from overloading. Chances are it's overdriving the input stage of
the recoreer. It's safer to turn the record level control up at least
half way and use the preamp gain to adjust the record level. Monitor
the output of the recorder to be sure you're not distorting.

Important mantras:

1. The output WILL become unbalanced when you connect it to a balanced
input, which you have to do. The preamp will probably not mind this
at all, but check before you go out to record something you care
about.

2. Impedance has nothing to do with the size and shape of audio
connectors. (It DOES have something to do with the size and shape
of RF connectors, but that's a completely different issue)

3. Unbalancing a balanced output WILL NOT "AFFECT THE SOUND QUALITY."
Say that over to yourself at least ten times.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 10:00:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2005-01-07, chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:

> Okay. Then what mixer do I need that can combine 2 XLR channels from 2
> mikes to a single stereo jack?

Lots of us low-budget musicians are having wonderful results with the
Behringer mixers. Behringer has mixers that will solve your current
problem and lots more problems that you might not even realize you have
yet, with anywhere from 2 input channels up to 32 or 48.

There are people who will recommend you steer away from Behringer
products for *political* reasons. You can follow or ignore that advice
as you please.

Or, you can spend incrementally money, and get an incrementally better
product. But for example a UB802 will still be a nice thing to have
on your shelf, even after you've upgraded to something bigger or better.
They aren't particularly noisy or made to low tolerances or anything.
You can do a lot worse for $50.
January 7, 2005 10:05:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Michael Putrino wrote:
> "Tom Penharston" <thinkpersuasion@netscape.net> wrote in message
> news:1105116303.424099.9970@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
>>What is the impedance rating on the input of your recording device? If
>>it's a high impedance input you will need a direct box or a transformer
>>to get a good sounding audio signal.
>>
>
>
> Not so. You will have no problem driving a high impedance input with a low
> impedance output. This is normal. You need no direct box or transformer.
> Direct boxes are used for the reverse: driving a low impedance input by a
> high impedance ourput.
>
> Chris: Since you output device also has a 1/4" balanced output, read the
> manual to determine if it will accept an unbalanced 1/4" plug inserted into
> it without harm (many do). If so, there are also simple cables/adapters for
> converting 1/4" unbalaced to either RCA and/or 1/8" connectors.
>
> Again, you should not need transformers or direct boxes.
>
> Mike Putrino
> Mastering Engineer
> Austin, TX


The complicated manual seems to indicate that XLR and 1/4" jacks run in
parallel. XLR in, XLR out and 1/4" in, 1/4" out only.
Anonymous
January 8, 2005 10:03:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <M3BDd.328$KJ2.226@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net> someone@somewhere.net writes:

> The complicated manual seems to indicate that XLR and 1/4" jacks run in
> parallel. XLR in, XLR out and 1/4" in, 1/4" out only.

What are you hiding? What preamp is this? And what recorder for that
matter?

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 9, 2005 3:54:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"DeserTBoB" <desertb@rglobal.net> wrote in message
news:06hrt0tckf1msbv702ep142fpbnomhi85s@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 18:24:26 GMT, chris <someone@somewhere.net> wrote:
>
>>I have a mic preamp with two separate channels. I am looking for a
>>cable/simple device that can combine two XLR channels to a single stereo
>>1/8" (or 1/4") jack. Where can I find it? <snip>
>
> You can't.

Yes you can. Pin 1 and 3 of each XLR to stereo jack sleeve. Pin 2 of each
XLR to tip and ring respectively.

Pretty 'agricultural' though .....


geoff
!