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Feedback on recordings requested!

Last response: in Home Audio
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January 6, 2005 3:47:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Here is some background:

I am in the process of trying to perfect some of my recording
techniques: trying out all kinds of different styles, recording
methods, mixdowns, EQ's, setup, you name it. I have three different
recordings to demonstrate, and I would appreciate any feedback in terms
of sound quality, mix proportions, frequency response, etc:

Here is my current setup:

1) For recording duties, I am using a Windows based DAW running Sonar
Producer version 4
2) For miking, I am using the preamps in a Mackie VLZ1202 Pro: I am
pulling the recorded signal from the pre-fader sends so that all of the
Mackie internal circuitry is bypassed except for the preamps
3) For miked guitar, I am using one (or several) SM57's
4) Most drum parts are played on a Roland VDrum setup with live pads,
however I also use some MIDI triggered sounds
5) Bass is recorded direct using a Sansamp RBI preamp and a cabinet sim
6) For A/D and D/A duties, I am using a MAudio Delta 1010 rack mount
setup
7) For compression (recorded compression) I am using a RNC
8) All effects that I use (like modulation, EQ, reverb, overall mix and
multiband compression) is coming from the Sonitus:FX DirectX plugins
(that come with Sonar)

As you can see, I am really shooting for a near-silent recording setup
that I can use at home. I record most everything direct, except in
cases where I just can't get the sound I want through any of my
preamps.
=======================================================
Recording #1 - Heavy Metal
http://www.llamamuds.com/uploads/TheGrindOwnzJ00.mp3

This song clip is mostly recorded direct on drum parts, bass part, and
rhythm guitar part. Distortion is coming from a Vamp into a cabinet
simulator. There is significant compression on the rhythm and bass
parts to get that 'squashed sound'. Also, the guitar parts have some
amount of low-mids chopped out to clean up the mix.

Recording #2 - Middle Eastern Instrumental
http://www.llamamuds.com/uploads/PersianMoon.mp3

This features an acoustic guitar, recorded direct through peizo pickups
blended with a large diaphram condensor mike for some string click
effect. The drum part was recorded live using two SM57's. This is
mostly recorded in a more traditional fashion, using mikes on the
instruments. The high pitched tones were recorded direct using an ebow
and a cabinet simulator. No EQ'ing done, however the is some
compression on the entire mix. The asoustic guitar part sounds heavily
compressed, however that 'thump' is coming from the peizo pickups
responding to the pick on the strings.

Recording #3
http://www.llamamuds.com/uploads/slow-blues.mp3

All parts are direct except for rhythm and lead guitar parts. The drum
part is a Roland Vdrum kit set in brush mode, bass is recorded direct
using the RBI. Guitar parts were done with a class A tube amp recorded
with an SM57.
=========================================================

I believe I can get decent recordings using this setup, considering I
didn't invest a large amount of money into it (compared with more
'professional' setups). If something sticks out as being a weak link,
please let me know.

If you aren't into these genre's of music, that is fine too, however I
am more trying to tweak my recording and mix setup at this point.
Thanks in advance!
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 3:11:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Miguel" <devon_coder@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1105044456.194233.72880@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Here is some background:
>
> I am in the process of trying to perfect some of my recording
> techniques: trying out all kinds of different styles, recording
> methods, mixdowns, EQ's, setup, you name it. I have three different
> recordings to demonstrate, and I would appreciate any feedback in terms
> of sound quality, mix proportions, frequency response, etc:

All of the following is just my own opinion, and we all know what opinions
are like.

> =======================================================
> Recording #1 - Heavy Metal
> http://www.llamamuds.com/uploads/TheGrindOwnzJ00.mp3
>
> This song clip is mostly recorded direct on drum parts, bass part, and
> rhythm guitar part. Distortion is coming from a Vamp into a cabinet
> simulator. There is significant compression on the rhythm and bass
> parts to get that 'squashed sound'. Also, the guitar parts have some
> amount of low-mids chopped out to clean up the mix.

You probably don't need this mush compression on a heavy guitar that's
already super compressed. I'd either try less compression of open the attack
up more. The drums really need some room - try a medium to small room
simulator on your reverb.


> Recording #2 - Middle Eastern Instrumental
> http://www.llamamuds.com/uploads/PersianMoon.mp3
>
> This features an acoustic guitar, recorded direct through peizo pickups
> blended with a large diaphram condensor mike for some string click
> effect. The drum part was recorded live using two SM57's. This is
> mostly recorded in a more traditional fashion, using mikes on the
> instruments. The high pitched tones were recorded direct using an ebow
> and a cabinet simulator. No EQ'ing done, however the is some
> compression on the entire mix. The asoustic guitar part sounds heavily
> compressed, however that 'thump' is coming from the peizo pickups
> responding to the pick on the strings.

Just MHO, the guitar needs more mic and less peizo. Play around with the
position of the mic and the guitar in the room to get the tone you're
looking for.

This sounds the best out of all three samples.

> Recording #3
> http://www.llamamuds.com/uploads/slow-blues.mp3
>
> All parts are direct except for rhythm and lead guitar parts. The drum
> part is a Roland Vdrum kit set in brush mode, bass is recorded direct
> using the RBI. Guitar parts were done with a class A tube amp recorded
> with an SM57.

I can't get past how the drums sound, but I'm a drummer and I can't really
listen objectively.

Overall it sounds good, but even on gear that you may feel is limited
there's still room to get even better. Not like I'm a bigshot - I started
out on about the same level of gear a couple of years ago. Get at least a
couple of good preamp channels (the RNP is a good value), and a couple of
good mics. That will make a surprising difference in the quality of what
you've recorded.

Again, just my opinions,
Sean
!