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Apogee PSX100 SE vs MOTU 828 MKII clocked by Apogee Big Ben

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Anonymous
January 6, 2005 4:12:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi,

I've got a MOTU 828 MKII and was wondering if anyone had an opinion.

I've got $1200 to spend on upgrading.

i've been thinking of an Apogee PSX100SE and using the clock to control
the 828. This would give the added benefit of the on board AD/DA
converters.

or

Use a Big Ben to clock the 828 MKII

Any other options that you could think of that would not exceed $1200.
Thanks
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 4:29:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

A. Morphous wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I've got a MOTU 828 MKII and was wondering if anyone had an opinion.
>
> I've got $1200 to spend on upgrading.
>
> i've been thinking of an Apogee PSX100SE and using the clock to control
> the 828. This would give the added benefit of the on board AD/DA
> converters.
>
> or
>
> Use a Big Ben to clock the 828 MKII
>
> Any other options that you could think of that would not exceed $1200.
> Thanks
>


What exactly are you "upgrading" for? To improve the clock on your 828,
ie, to spend money? What are you trying to achieve?
January 6, 2005 10:48:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I've got a MOTU 828 MKII and was wondering if anyone had an opinion.
>
> I've got $1200 to spend on upgrading.
>
> i've been thinking of an Apogee PSX100SE and using the clock to control
> the 828. This would give the added benefit of the on board AD/DA
> converters.
>
> or
>
> Use a Big Ben to clock the 828 MKII
>
> Any other options that you could think of that would not exceed $1200.
> Thanks

In last month's EQ, it's talked about in the article on Brian Wilson's SMiLE
ablum;

I personally have no clue if it's worth it but, perhaps the Apogee
converters have a lot
more to do with the sound quality to begin with?

Quote-

SMiLE was recorded to a Digidesign Pro Tools | HD system running at 88.2
kHz/24-bit. Linett used Apogee AD-16 and Rosetta converters and an Apogee
Big Ben clock. He is a fervent believer in using quality external clock
devices. "That should be the first thing you buy after you get your first
DAW," he admonishes. "When I was remixing Pet Sounds I was using a Nuendo
rig running at 96/24, and I had Digi bring over a Pro Tools system so I
could do a shoot out." Regardless of the combination of systems and
converters, the biggest difference he found was in the use of onboard versus
external clocks. "That's what really opened the soundfield up," he says.

Unqte-
January 6, 2005 10:57:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

By the way, the quote was from Engineer Mark Linett.

>
> In last month's EQ, it's talked about in the article on Brian Wilson's
SMiLE
> ablum;
>
> I personally have no clue if it's worth it but, perhaps the Apogee
> converters have a lot
> more to do with the sound quality to begin with?
>
> Quote-
>
> SMiLE was recorded to a Digidesign Pro Tools | HD system running at 88.2
> kHz/24-bit. Linett used Apogee AD-16 and Rosetta converters and an Apogee
> Big Ben clock. He is a fervent believer in using quality external clock
> devices. "That should be the first thing you buy after you get your first
> DAW," he admonishes. "When I was remixing Pet Sounds I was using a Nuendo
> rig running at 96/24, and I had Digi bring over a Pro Tools system so I
> could do a shoot out." Regardless of the combination of systems and
> converters, the biggest difference he found was in the use of onboard
versus
> external clocks. "That's what really opened the soundfield up," he says.
>
> Unqte-
>
>
!