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Is there a way I can get 4 devices on one ethernet outlet?

Last response: in Networking
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February 8, 2013 3:48:47 AM

I don't really know how much an Ethernet switch works, as I am new to building computers and such.

I'm going to be building a PC. I want to use ethernet cable instead of wireless for it. To do so, we're having a contractor install ethernet outlets in each of the rooms in the house, however that's going to work.

So I'll have one in my room.

I want to hook up my PS3, Xbox 360, Apple TV, and my desktop up to the one outlet in the wall, without having to change them at any time manually. But I also want to be able to use them at once without having to turn them off.

Say I'm playing an Xbox game, but I can't save it. An NHL game comes on and I want to watch it, so I change my TV to the PS3 input and watch the NHL game. While watching the NHL game, I want to browse on my PC.

So having 3 devices at once is ideal.

How would I go about doing this?
February 8, 2013 4:30:32 AM

You have a couple of choices. #1. Have 4 runs brought into the room / outlet box where the devices are, and connect back to where the router / switch is, or you can add a small say 5 or 8 port switch. 1 port connects to the cable from the wall, the other ports connect to your devices...

By adding the switch in your space instead of connecting back to a single larger switch, you are effectively creating your own "Star topology" network that simply connects to another via the ethernet cable. The fact remains that you are in the same logical space / IP address range, so everything should talk just fine...

The drawback is everything talks back to the rest of the network over one wire, limited to the port speed, instead of the switch speed, so 4 devices for example will share a gigabit cable back to your router. Not too shabby, and odds are your internet connection is your real weak spot anyway...
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February 8, 2013 10:16:30 PM

Kirihuna said:
I don't really know how much an Ethernet switch works, as I am new to building computers and such.

I'm going to be building a PC. I want to use ethernet cable instead of wireless for it. To do so, we're having a contractor install ethernet outlets in each of the rooms in the house, however that's going to work.

So I'll have one in my room.

I want to hook up my PS3, Xbox 360, Apple TV, and my desktop up to the one outlet in the wall, without having to change them at any time manually. But I also want to be able to use them at once without having to turn them off.

Say I'm playing an Xbox game, but I can't save it. An NHL game comes on and I want to watch it, so I change my TV to the PS3 input and watch the NHL game. While watching the NHL game, I want to browse on my PC.

So having 3 devices at once is ideal.

How would I go about doing this?


You have two questions here, if you want to split one network port into seveal, get a switch. Would be a lot cheaper than installing 4 jacks. Using several devices at one time does not really involve network at all, just some simple connections, get 3 monitors or a TV with picture in picture and swap inputs. If you talk to a good A/V shop they will be able to explain what you would want to buy, usually a cheap TV will have limited inputs and no PIP so you'd have to go mid to high range for the equipment.
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February 8, 2013 10:21:05 PM

Kirihuna said:
I don't really know how much an Ethernet switch works, as I am new to building computers and such.

I'm going to be building a PC. I want to use ethernet cable instead of wireless for it. To do so, we're having a contractor install ethernet outlets in each of the rooms in the house, however that's going to work.

So I'll have one in my room.

I want to hook up my PS3, Xbox 360, Apple TV, and my desktop up to the one outlet in the wall, without having to change them at any time manually. But I also want to be able to use them at once without having to turn them off.

Say I'm playing an Xbox game, but I can't save it. An NHL game comes on and I want to watch it, so I change my TV to the PS3 input and watch the NHL game. While watching the NHL game, I want to browse on my PC.

So having 3 devices at once is ideal.

How would I go about doing this?

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February 9, 2013 1:14:06 AM

dbhosttexas said:
For $2.00 more and free shipping included, he can get he 8 port version from Amazon, instead of the 5, in case he wants to plug in a friends PC for some LAN gaming as well...


I didn't post the item advertising it as the best deal. I posted it as an example of a device that would suit the need.
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February 15, 2013 1:42:22 PM

aford10 said:
I didn't post the item advertising it as the best deal. I posted it as an example of a device that would suit the need.


Didn't mean to come across like that. The OP mentioned adding 4 devices to his system, and I am not a huge fan of filling up switches to full capacity is all. I like having extra ports, hence the recommendation of an 8 port switch... It's just me being me. I like having excess capacity. Much better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it...
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February 15, 2013 2:00:49 PM

Ideal Switch - Link


At least then you're future proof for when you want to VLAN each room in your house for 6 devices in each.



But in all seriousness I agree. 8-port switches are just as cheap and it does give you room to expand ;P
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February 15, 2013 3:29:58 PM

Vanadil said:
Ideal Switch - Link


At least then you're future proof for when you want to VLAN each room in your house for 6 devices in each.



But in all seriousness I agree. 8-port switches are just as cheap and it does give you room to expand ;P


Okay but if you are going to suggest a Layer 2 switch, why not a Gigabit switch?

http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-SG200-26-Ethernet-Mini-GBIC-Warranty/dp/B004GHMU5G/ref=pd_cp_e_0

Not sure about pricing on the other side of the pond, but here in the states, there is next to no cost difference. (Depending on Amazon deals, sometimes the gigabit models are cheaper...)


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