MMORPG - Den for immature Kids?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

Recently I came back to RPG market,

My first MMORPG (not counting the old BBS games) was a recent venture into
an indie game advertised here no so long ago - Mordisle.
I don't want to generalize based on one indie MMORPG game but I am
concerned about this experience (wondering whether MMORPG is for me?)

Essentially, I found many of the juvenile antics in the PVP area
ridiculous. In fact I asked the age of one of the players, when he
answered 14 I apologized and said "I guess you are just acting your age"

Up until recently I though I was the only person in their 30's still
playing RPG's (the 1st CRPG played topic suggests otherwise - man you guys
were playing way back when I was :)

For fear of generalizing this expereincing I would just like to ask the
more experienced MMORPG players, is this commonplace?

THIS being immature trash talking, killing the same repeatedly etc... I
mean I like PVP and I Know some people need to get the short end of the
stick but aren't there any rules? (huge question I know)

Cheers,

Hawklan
39 answers Last reply
More about mmorpg immature kids
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Hawklan wrote:
    > Essentially, I found many of the juvenile antics in the PVP area
    > ridiculous. In fact I asked the age of one of the players, when he
    > answered 14 I apologized and said "I guess you are just acting your
    age"

    Why do you think that, when given the choice, most people prefer
    non-PvP games to PvP? Particularly where it's level and gear-based, so
    a player with ten more levels and the best gear in the game can gank
    the average player with impunity?

    Heck, you don't think that games like that would _attract_ the
    immature, do you?

    Mark
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Mean_Chlorine wrote:
    > If you want MMORPG, people in this newsgroup seem to prefer City of
    > Heroes, World of Warcraft, or Everquest2.

    Or if you want fantasy PvP without ganking, Guild Wars is worth a look.
    It's not a 'real' MMORPG since everything is instanced, but it is quite
    fun and, because everything is instanced, it's more mission-based than
    the traditional 'kill ten rats and bring me their ears and I'll give
    you a rusty sword' MMORPG.

    Mark
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Hawklan wrote:
    > What is 'instanced' - remember I am new to MMORPG's.

    In a traditional MMORPG there's one copy of each zone in the game, and
    all players enter that zone: e.g. if a hundred players go into the
    'Dungeon of Doom' zone then you'll see all ninety-nine other players
    there with you.

    In an instanced game, each group goes into their own copy of the zone.
    So even if a hundred players go into the 'Dungeon of Doom', you'll only
    see the other four or five people in your group there... for a hundred
    people the server would be running 15-20 _different_ copies of the
    'Dungeon of Doom' zone rather than just one.

    Mark
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Saw the box and ws intrigued(by Guild Wars that is.)

    What is 'instanced' - remember I am new to MMORPG's.

    Cheers,
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    "Hawklan" <kristan.miller@nospamdnd.ca> wrote in
    news:92f4b76aa773e0993a0ae9499f664f6a@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com:

    > Essentially, I found many of the juvenile antics in the PVP area
    > ridiculous. In fact I asked the age of one of the players, when he
    > answered 14 I apologized and said "I guess you are just acting your
    > age"

    Yes 14 seems to be a common age for that type of thing. Im surprised at
    how often it comes up. Must he hormonal or something.

    > Up until recently I though I was the only person in their 30's still
    > playing RPG's (the 1st CRPG played topic suggests otherwise - man you
    > guys were playing way back when I was :)

    Heehee. Im nearing half a century and more often than not I dont even win
    the "oldest person" contest in even fairly small groups.

    > THIS being immature trash talking, killing the same repeatedly etc...
    > I mean I like PVP and I Know some people need to get the short end of
    > the stick but aren't there any rules? (huge question I know)

    Keep looking around. You will find one you like. Persently Im scouting
    around in the free shards that work with the old Ultima Online software.
    Lots of fun. But I see many that are obvious kiddy clubs, and others that
    are run and played by much more mature people. It usually doesnt take
    long to find out which is which. Ive found that those with language
    controls tend to have an older player base.

    Actually, I knew that long before. Its a basic truism from the MUD days
    and even back to BBSs. The kids think that language rules are to make the
    place a 'kiddy' place but it tends to have quite the oppossite affect

    Gandalf Parker
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Hey good to hear from ya Gandalf,

    I've heard alot about WOW. I like the world ( As experienced in past
    games). The concept seems nice, other than technical issues how does it
    hold up?

    Can it be played as a CRPG? (I used to play Diablo online and offline
    in multi-player for a thougher challenge when my characters got too
    strong).

    Cheers,
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    "Hawklan" <kristan.miller@nospamdnd.ca> wrote in
    news:f96476129a2d5028ef082b6f768e950d@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com:

    > Hey good to hear from ya Gandalf,
    >
    > I've heard alot about WOW. I like the world ( As experienced in past
    > games). The concept seems nice, other than technical issues how does it
    > hold up?

    Believe it or not I havent tried that one yet. About the only one I havent.
    :)

    > Can it be played as a CRPG? (I used to play Diablo online and offline
    > in multi-player for a thougher challenge when my characters got too
    > strong).

    I still jump into Diablo when I want a quick no-thought game. I wouldnt
    mind them doing another one.

    Im amazed that they keep those servers going.

    Gandalf Parker
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Thusly "Hawklan" <kristan.miller@nospamdnd.ca> Spake Unto All:

    >For fear of generalizing this expereincing I would just like to ask the
    >more experienced MMORPG players, is this commonplace?

    Not universal, but commonplace, yes.

    >THIS being immature trash talking, killing the same repeatedly etc... I
    >mean I like PVP and I Know some people need to get the short end of the
    >stick but aren't there any rules? (huge question I know)

    The bulk of the playerbase are juveniles. The c.s.i.p.g.r group is a
    relic from the old days, WE'RE relics - most of the people playing
    MMORPGs don't even know the newsgroups exist.

    You can get enjoyable multiplayer RPG'ing, but you need to find good
    people. The easiest and most agreeable is to gather your own friends
    into a LAN session of Neverwinter Nights or Diablo II.

    There was an attempt at catering to a more mature audience of MMORPG
    players in A Tale In The Desert, but it sortof went overboard in the
    other direction. I think it's still around if you want to check it
    out.

    If you want MMORPG, people in this newsgroup seem to prefer City of
    Heroes, World of Warcraft, or Everquest2.

    >Hawklan

    --
    Fun Fact of the Day: In exit polls at the election 2004 the percentage of American
    voters citing moral and ethical values as their prime concern was 22 percent,
    continuing a trend of *decreasing* perceived importance of morals: In the 2000
    election 35 percent cited morals & ethical values as their prime concern, and in
    1996 a whopping 40%, almost twice as many as in 2004.
    (Bet you hadn't gotten that impression from the press, had you?)
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    On 2005-03-31, Mean_Chlorine <mike_noren2002@NOSPAMyahoo.co.uk> wrote:

    > The bulk of the playerbase are juveniles. The c.s.i.p.g.r group is a
    > relic from the old days, WE'RE relics - most of the people playing
    > MMORPGs don't even know the newsgroups exist.

    Very true. In fact the reason is this newsgroup barely serves a
    purpose anymore. Pre-google and pre-most-of-the-web we came here
    to ask questions, write faqs about games, and discuss them. Now
    you're better off using a web forum, kiddiness aside, there's
    more content there.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    shadows wrote:

    > On 2005-03-31, Mean_Chlorine <mike_noren2002@NOSPAMyahoo.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The bulk of the playerbase are juveniles. The c.s.i.p.g.r group is a
    >>relic from the old days, WE'RE relics - most of the people playing
    >>MMORPGs don't even know the newsgroups exist.
    >
    >
    > Very true. In fact the reason is this newsgroup barely serves a
    > purpose anymore. Pre-google and pre-most-of-the-web we came here
    > to ask questions, write faqs about games, and discuss them. Now
    > you're better off using a web forum, kiddiness aside, there's
    > more content there.

    *shudder* I'd sooner dive into a swimming pool filled with double edged
    razor blades than spend one more minute in a web forum (thanks weird al!)
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Stay away from the non-RP servers in WOW. The non-RP servers is where the
    kiddie set tends to hang out.

    Jonah Falcon
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 17:01:29 GMT, Jonah Falcon wrote:

    > Stay away from the non-RP servers in WOW. The non-RP servers is where the
    > kiddie set tends to hang out.
    >
    > Jonah Falcon

    Unfortunately having "RP" next to a server name is no ward against the
    juvenile mindset. There are not enough GMs in *any* MMOG to police every
    server (and the policeing they *do* do is so watered down as to be either
    pointless or ineffective). You might run into the "RP Nazi"* as often as
    the juvenile ganker. Either way it is usually an unpleasant experience.

    *When will people learn that phrasing questions with "thou" and "art" is
    *not* roleplaying.
    --
    RJB
    3/31/2005 2:25:59 PM

    Hanlon's Razor:
    "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by
    stupidity."
    -Anon.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    If an MMORPG has an RP (role playing) server, head there. They're more
    closely moderated, and far less kiddies there.

    Jonah Falcon
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    "Hawklan" <kristan.miller@nospamdnd.ca> once tried to test me with:

    > THIS being immature trash talking, killing the same repeatedly etc... I
    > mean I like PVP and I Know some people need to get the short end of the
    > stick but aren't there any rules? (huge question I know)

    LOL, WTF, OMG. N3wb. I pwnz j000!

    (ahem)

    Yeah, people can be pricks online.

    I still really enjoy World of Warcraft though. When it works.

    --

    Knight37 - http://knightgames.blogspot.com

    Once a Gamer, Always a Gamer.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    James Garvin wrote:

    > shadows wrote:
    >
    >> On 2005-03-31, Mean_Chlorine <mike_noren2002@NOSPAMyahoo.co.uk> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> The bulk of the playerbase are juveniles. The c.s.i.p.g.r group is a
    >>> relic from the old days, WE'RE relics - most of the people playing
    >>> MMORPGs don't even know the newsgroups exist.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Very true. In fact the reason is this newsgroup barely serves a
    >> purpose anymore. Pre-google and pre-most-of-the-web we came here
    >> to ask questions, write faqs about games, and discuss them. Now
    >> you're better off using a web forum, kiddiness aside, there's
    >> more content there.
    >
    >
    > *shudder* I'd sooner dive into a swimming pool filled with double edged
    > razor blades than spend one more minute in a web forum (thanks weird al!)

    Ah, but would you rather clean all the bathrooms in Grand Central
    Station with your tongue?
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Knight37 wrote:

    > "Hawklan" <kristan.miller@nospamdnd.ca> once tried to test me with:
    >
    >
    >>THIS being immature trash talking, killing the same repeatedly etc... I
    >>mean I like PVP and I Know some people need to get the short end of the
    >>stick but aren't there any rules? (huge question I know)
    >
    >
    > LOL, WTF, OMG. N3wb. I pwnz j000!

    OMGWTFBBQ! What does "pwnz j000" translate to in adult?
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Thx for the info,

    Unfortunately it looks like my early impressions of MMORPG can be
    generalized to WOW. I am sad in a sense because I see so much potential
    for solid, strategic gaming with online play.

    Back in the day on BBS's playing games like Trade Wars showed that
    potential. I think I will stay away from WOW and just keep playing CRPG's.
    Just played BG2 for the first time!

    Cheers & Thanks,

    Hawklan
  18. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Hawklan wrote:

    > Thx for the info,
    >
    > Unfortunately it looks like my early impressions of MMORPG can be
    > generalized to WOW. I am sad in a sense because I see so much potential
    > for solid, strategic gaming with online play.
    >
    > Back in the day on BBS's playing games like Trade Wars showed that
    > potential. I think I will stay away from WOW and just keep playing CRPG's.
    > Just played BG2 for the first time!

    They really should make a Trade Wars MMORPG!
  19. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Thus spake Troll <newstroll@shaw.ca>, Fri, 01 Apr 2005 06:31:09 GMT, Anno
    Domini:

    >Knight37 wrote:
    >
    >> "Hawklan" <kristan.miller@nospamdnd.ca> once tried to test me with:
    >>
    >>
    >>>THIS being immature trash talking, killing the same repeatedly etc... I
    >>>mean I like PVP and I Know some people need to get the short end of the
    >>>stick but aren't there any rules? (huge question I know)
    >>
    >>
    >> LOL, WTF, OMG. N3wb. I pwnz j000!
    >
    >OMGWTFBBQ! What does "pwnz j000" translate to in adult?

    there ya go....:)

    --
    Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.
  20. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    "Hawklan" <kristan.miller@nospamdnd.ca> wrote in message
    news:92f4b76aa773e0993a0ae9499f664f6a@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com...
    > Recently I came back to RPG market,
    >
    > My first MMORPG (not counting the old BBS games) was a recent venture into
    > an indie game advertised here no so long ago - Mordisle.
    > I don't want to generalize based on one indie MMORPG game but I am
    > concerned about this experience (wondering whether MMORPG is for me?)
    >
    > Essentially, I found many of the juvenile antics in the PVP area
    > ridiculous. In fact I asked the age of one of the players, when he
    > answered 14 I apologized and said "I guess you are just acting your age"
    >
    > Up until recently I though I was the only person in their 30's still
    > playing RPG's (the 1st CRPG played topic suggests otherwise - man you guys
    > were playing way back when I was :)
    >
    > For fear of generalizing this expereincing I would just like to ask the
    > more experienced MMORPG players, is this commonplace?
    >
    > THIS being immature trash talking, killing the same repeatedly etc... I
    > mean I like PVP and I Know some people need to get the short end of the
    > stick but aren't there any rules? (huge question I know)
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Hawklan
    >

    There are certainly some guilds in these games composed exclusively of
    adults. Try advertising, I'm sure they would be happy to recruit someone
    with a driver's license who also shaves regularly.
  21. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    <mmaker@my-deja.com> wrote in message
    news:1112285876.522696.238460@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > Hawklan wrote:
    >> What is 'instanced' - remember I am new to MMORPG's.
    >
    > In a traditional MMORPG there's one copy of each zone in the game, and
    > all players enter that zone: e.g. if a hundred players go into the
    > 'Dungeon of Doom' zone then you'll see all ninety-nine other players
    > there with you.
    >
    > In an instanced game, each group goes into their own copy of the zone.
    > So even if a hundred players go into the 'Dungeon of Doom', you'll only
    > see the other four or five people in your group there... for a hundred
    > people the server would be running 15-20 _different_ copies of the
    > 'Dungeon of Doom' zone rather than just one.
    >
    > Mark

    Well, that throws me off Guild Wars for good -- I didn't know. I don't like
    the isolation produced by instanced dungeons. I can play a single-player
    game for that.
  22. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Grackle wrote:
    > That takes away the most important aspect of an mmorpg, which is to
    have
    > people inhabiting the same world as yourself.

    If you like camping, kill-stealing, ninja-looting, training, respawning
    mobs and all the other delights that occur in MMOGs as a result. I'm
    not a huge fan of instancing either, but it does have big benefits if
    you want to create an online game that's more like a traditional RPG.

    > All single-player rpgs
    > are essentially linear storylines with milestones that trigger new
    events.

    As are the 'story' missions in Guild Wars. Again, I'm not convinced
    it's the best way to design a game, but for the game they've developed,
    it works pretty well.

    Mark
  23. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Thus spake "Grackle" <nobody@lalaland.ca>, Sat, 2 Apr 2005 17:19:52 -0500,
    Anno Domini:

    ><mmaker@my-deja.com> wrote in message
    >news:1112285876.522696.238460@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    >> Hawklan wrote:
    >>> What is 'instanced' - remember I am new to MMORPG's.
    >>
    >> In a traditional MMORPG there's one copy of each zone in the game, and
    >> all players enter that zone: e.g. if a hundred players go into the
    >> 'Dungeon of Doom' zone then you'll see all ninety-nine other players
    >> there with you.
    >>
    >> In an instanced game, each group goes into their own copy of the zone.
    >> So even if a hundred players go into the 'Dungeon of Doom', you'll only
    >> see the other four or five people in your group there... for a hundred
    >> people the server would be running 15-20 _different_ copies of the
    >> 'Dungeon of Doom' zone rather than just one.
    >>
    >> Mark
    >
    >Well, that throws me off Guild Wars for good -- I didn't know. I don't like
    >the isolation produced by instanced dungeons. I can play a single-player
    >game for that.

    I posted a suggestion for a semi-mmog concept a couple months back that I
    thought would have a market: basically, you have a decent SP/co-op style
    crpg (ala Gothic1/2, NWN, etc. Then you create an online framework for it,
    kinda like D2/Guildwars where you can chat, trade & do other non-ingame
    stuff. So, you get the feeling of a mmorpg, but you can still be the central
    focus of the storyline (because the entire game is *your* instanced version,
    along with none, 1 or more friends for co-op play. Games like BG1/2's style
    would even benefit from this approach. You would have Steam-like *duck*
    online content updates (w/o the bullshit manual patching); you could get
    help & maybe even 'call in' a mate or two for a particularly tough battle,
    rather than use dumb NPCs. The beauty of it is, you'd feel like you were in
    a thriving, living world, with real people for background chatter. Perhaps
    even common inns & taverns (with limited players per instance) where people
    can 'team-up'. Of course, any progress has to apply to the host's world
    snapshot, or optionally to all (but handled much better than D2's mission
    structure which was just beggin to be exploited from day 1). Different
    players could even be playing in different adventures/modules/area as part
    of the illusion of a seamless world, but again, each players controls his
    own character, savegames & quest progress. The way mmogs do it today leaves
    a lot to be desired, with the storyline & quest depth & complexity
    suffering. There's gotta a be a better way where everyone can feel like the
    central hero, rather than a treadmill hamster or sheep *sigh*...

    --
    Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.
  24. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    "Nostromo" <nostromo@spamfree.net.au> wrote in message
    news:oi8v41tmnr2cs4sblh8tninj19l04mvgc4@4ax.com...
    > Thus spake "Grackle" <nobody@lalaland.ca>, Sat, 2 Apr 2005 17:19:52 -0500,
    > Anno Domini:
    >
    >><mmaker@my-deja.com> wrote in message
    >>news:1112285876.522696.238460@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    >>> Hawklan wrote:
    >>>> What is 'instanced' - remember I am new to MMORPG's.
    >>>
    >>> In a traditional MMORPG there's one copy of each zone in the game, and
    >>> all players enter that zone: e.g. if a hundred players go into the
    >>> 'Dungeon of Doom' zone then you'll see all ninety-nine other players
    >>> there with you.
    >>>
    >>> In an instanced game, each group goes into their own copy of the zone.
    >>> So even if a hundred players go into the 'Dungeon of Doom', you'll only
    >>> see the other four or five people in your group there... for a hundred
    >>> people the server would be running 15-20 _different_ copies of the
    >>> 'Dungeon of Doom' zone rather than just one.
    >>>
    >>> Mark
    >>
    >>Well, that throws me off Guild Wars for good -- I didn't know. I don't
    >>like
    >>the isolation produced by instanced dungeons. I can play a single-player
    >>game for that.
    >
    > I posted a suggestion for a semi-mmog concept a couple months back that I
    > thought would have a market: basically, you have a decent SP/co-op style
    > crpg (ala Gothic1/2, NWN, etc. Then you create an online framework for it,
    > kinda like D2/Guildwars where you can chat, trade & do other non-ingame
    > stuff. So, you get the feeling of a mmorpg, but you can still be the
    > central
    > focus of the storyline (because the entire game is *your* instanced
    > version,
    > along with none, 1 or more friends for co-op play. Games like BG1/2's
    > style
    > would even benefit from this approach. You would have Steam-like *duck*
    > online content updates (w/o the bullshit manual patching); you could get
    > help & maybe even 'call in' a mate or two for a particularly tough battle,
    > rather than use dumb NPCs. The beauty of it is, you'd feel like you were
    > in
    > a thriving, living world, with real people for background chatter. Perhaps
    > even common inns & taverns (with limited players per instance) where
    > people
    > can 'team-up'. Of course, any progress has to apply to the host's world
    > snapshot, or optionally to all (but handled much better than D2's mission
    > structure which was just beggin to be exploited from day 1). Different
    > players could even be playing in different adventures/modules/area as part
    > of the illusion of a seamless world, but again, each players controls his
    > own character, savegames & quest progress. The way mmogs do it today
    > leaves
    > a lot to be desired, with the storyline & quest depth & complexity
    > suffering. There's gotta a be a better way where everyone can feel like
    > the
    > central hero, rather than a treadmill hamster or sheep *sigh*...
    >
    > --
    > Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.

    That takes away the most important aspect of an mmorpg, which is to have
    people inhabiting the same world as yourself. In your system, the chat
    would work fine (although it can lead to quest spoilers), but the item
    trading would cause 'synchronization problems' because not everyone in the
    single-player game has progressed to the same place. All single-player rpgs
    are essentially linear storylines with milestones that trigger new events.
  25. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    mmaker@my-deja.com writes:

    > As are the 'story' missions in Guild Wars. Again, I'm not convinced
    > it's the best way to design a game, but for the game they've developed,
    > it works pretty well.

    The Guild Wars concept has been tried before in sci-fi trappings:
    Phantasy Star Online on Dreamcast and later editions on GameCube used
    the hub + instances concept. Not the world's greatest successes, but
    mostly because of too much cheating.
  26. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Thusly Tor Iver Wilhelmsen <tor.iver.wilhelmsen@broadpark.no> Spake
    Unto All:

    >mmaker@my-deja.com writes:
    >
    >> As are the 'story' missions in Guild Wars. Again, I'm not convinced
    >> it's the best way to design a game, but for the game they've developed,
    >> it works pretty well.
    >
    >The Guild Wars concept has been tried before in sci-fi trappings:
    >Phantasy Star Online on Dreamcast and later editions on GameCube used
    >the hub + instances concept. Not the world's greatest successes, but
    >mostly because of too much cheating.

    Personally I think hub + instancing sounds great. You can meet and
    pick up groups at the hub, and, I mean, are other groups of players
    anything but an annoyance once you're in a dungeon bashing the minions
    of evil? Who wants to stand in line to kill the Evil Wotzit?

    --
    Fun Fact of the Day: In exit polls at the election 2004 the percentage of American
    voters citing moral and ethical values as their prime concern was 22 percent,
    continuing a trend of *decreasing* perceived importance of morals: In the 2000
    election 35 percent cited morals & ethical values as their prime concern, and in
    1996 a whopping 40%, almost twice as many as in 2004.
    (Bet you hadn't gotten that impression from the press, had you?)
  27. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    >>The Guild Wars concept has been tried before in sci-fi trappings:
    >>Phantasy Star Online on Dreamcast and later editions on GameCube used

    >>the hub + instances concept. Not the world's greatest successes, but
    >>mostly because of too much cheating.

    >Personally I think hub + instancing sounds great. You can meet and
    >pick up groups at the hub, and, I mean, are other groups of players
    >anything but an annoyance once you're in a dungeon bashing the minions

    >of evil? Who wants to stand in line to kill the Evil Wotzit?

    The original PSO was very successful. Played it for more hours then I
    care to admit. Put Sega failed to move the game on and charged
    increasing amount for updates that only added a few new features.
    Hence, people gave up and went elsewhere.

    The hub (or lobbies as it was called) was great for meting up with your
    mates. Everyone had their own lobby they used and there were ones for
    general pick up groups (Although that's was where all the hackers
    were, so you'll be nuts to play on them!) You log on, see who's on
    and join them straight away. None of this travelling to met people.
  28. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    I'd modify that concept slightly : While each world instanced, everyone
    share the same world, somehw SIm-like
    That is action of one player updatet to all instances then other
    players join hub. Loot dropped appear, chests get looted, NPC get
    killed, other NPC get spawned, player made structures built, other
    player's pets could be fought. One player can build stronghold to hide
    his possession and defend it with traps and hired NPC, other loot it.
    The protocol for conflicting time-branch resolution is not difficalt to
    devise. The main problem how to prevent exploits.
  29. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    You know it's funny I also stopped playing games - ugh not 18 though -
    sometime in University... Recently I got back into the market with my son
    (who needs dads help the play - age appropriate games of course :)

    Unfortunately I can relate with thrasher, whether those vic 20, 64 and
    early pc games were actually as good as I remember them or not is
    immaterial - the end result is, I am disapointed.

    Yes we have grown up, and maybe the experience of gaming itself was more
    fun at that age, but it seems like the games themsleves were more
    compelling.

    A recent example, is when I go to a pc gaming store (ugh- don't exist
    anymore right?) I mean electronics store. The merchandising section for Pc
    games is nowhere near as extensive as it used to be. It does appear that
    the growth of the console market has done so at the expense of the PC
    Gaming industry (even though many publishers produce for both).

    I can tolerate immaturity, even from adults - but stupidity is hard to
    bear. I don't intellectual discussion (I mean I have a wife for that!) but
    someone using Messenger to say "nah, nah , nah ," after ganking me (I've
    learned this is the most appropriate term), I mean come on.

    I don't remember ever partaking in those antics even when I was that age.
    I mean I argued with my buddy over who got the spoils for our party in
    Bard's Tale Thief of Fate.

    Anyways, gaming is just not the same. Maybe we are different and maybe the
    industry is different but god I wish I could find my C64 again.

    Cheers,

    Hawklan
  30. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    On Sat, 2 Apr 2005 17:16:41 -0500, Grackle wrote:

    <snip>
    > There are certainly some guilds in these games composed exclusively of
    > adults. Try advertising, I'm sure they would be happy to recruit someone
    > with a driver's license who also shaves regularly.
    Don't put much into the theory of post-pubescent females playing MMOGs did
    ya? Or are you considering armpits and legs as well? ;)

    --
    RJB
    4/6/2005 12:54:32 PM

    "Civilization is unbearable, but it is less unbearable at the top."
    -Timothy Leary
  31. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    "RJB" <robartle@NOSPAM.hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1i5dkqjstlevk$.dlg@robartle.NOSPAM.hotmail.com...
    > On Sat, 2 Apr 2005 17:16:41 -0500, Grackle wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >> There are certainly some guilds in these games composed exclusively of
    >> adults. Try advertising, I'm sure they would be happy to recruit someone
    >> with a driver's license who also shaves regularly.
    > Don't put much into the theory of post-pubescent females playing MMOGs did
    > ya? Or are you considering armpits and legs as well? ;)
    >

    I assume the original poster is male. But yeah, women included; the ones
    from North America shave their legs and pits, while the ones from Europe
    shave their beards.
  32. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    "Hawklan" <kris@nospamdnd.ca> wrote in message
    news:5aef50da0d5fcc6930c18ce0661eea00@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com...
    >
    > I guess in the New landscape in MMORPG's there is very little room for
    > father's, grown-ups or otherwise serious gamers. Maybe I can re-live it
    > through my children? :)
    >

    Your children are a great excuse for allowing you to act like a child
    yourself, without other people looking at you weird. You're very lucky, and
    if you have a daughter, you can even finally get to play with Barbie (don't
    deny it, you want to).
  33. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Unfortunately, I have always preferred the life size barbie's, hence the
    children. I say unfortunately because they look great - but don't listen
    as well as the plastic variety ;).

    Yea, I guess children are a good excuse to act like a kid. I would not be
    playing pc games again had it not been for my son. Football and video
    games ,woo hoo!

    Cheers,

    Hawklan
  34. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Xocyll wrote:

    > Really depended on the BBS software you chose.
    > Some were dead easy to set up, some took a lot more fiddling.
    > Then of course there was the question of 1-line or multiline.
    > Anyone could set up an ok single line BBS, if they got a good BBS
    > package (and for a single line BBS you could use any BBS software.)
    > For multiline though there were only a few, commercial, BBS packages and
    > they tended to be a bit harder to configure.

    Agreed. By todays standard they are impossible. Software today is very
    install and run. Most software is pretty easy to configure (unless it
    is MS Exchange) and isn't that hard to get running out of the box. The
    old BBS were a pain in the butt. The multiline package I uses was
    f----bbs (I don't remember the full name...it was like fragglebbs or
    something like that). It was hard as hell to make multiline work.

    Today a web server (Apache comes to mind) is basically install and
    go...can't much easier than that!

    I think the average user isn't smarter and the average kid isn't more
    tech savvy, but the software and hardware are FAR easier for the average
    joe.

    > From the user's perspective, really all you had to know was how to start
    > your comm package and dial in.

    IRRC Procomm (Promodem???) was an excellent dial in package that was
    "easy" to use (although you still had to know some of the modem commands).

    > Frankly, I miss jumpers.

    I agree...Jumpers did make it a little less plug and play, but it would
    work right out of the box...right after you configured the jumpers ;-)

    > I miss being able to set a modem to a specific comm port and IRQ, then
    > install it and have it there, instead of fighting windows for where it's
    > going to go (and windows always of course trying to share the IRQ with
    > something else unless forced not to.)

    Agreed. IRQ sharing is par for the course now. Honestly 15 IRQs is too
    few. In modern computers IRQ sharing works (sorta), but really we
    should have more IRQs.

    > I found the Read Docs, Set Jumper, Install routine to be much faster and
    > easier than the Install, Hope windows identifies the hardware properly,
    > Fight windows to not share IRQs and to use settings the software can see
    > routine.
    > The number of times I had windows decide the modem was really a printer,
    > or a soundcard or whatever and when finally convinced it was a modem it
    > would decide to stick it on Comm Port 15 and share the video cards IRQ,
    > making it totally non functional.

    Yup! It has gotten better, but there are still tons of problems!

    > Yeah, I guess sometimes windows gets it right the first time, but i've
    > never seen it happen.

    I've had it happen with name brand stuff, but generally it doesn't
    happen if the hardware is really new or if the hardware is generic.
  35. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Thus spake "Grackle" <nobody@lalaland.ca>, Thu, 7 Apr 2005 19:58:13 -0400,
    Anno Domini:

    >"Hawklan" <kris@nospamdnd.ca> wrote in message
    >news:5aef50da0d5fcc6930c18ce0661eea00@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com...
    >>
    >> I guess in the New landscape in MMORPG's there is very little room for
    >> father's, grown-ups or otherwise serious gamers. Maybe I can re-live it
    >> through my children? :)
    >>
    >
    >Your children are a great excuse for allowing you to act like a child
    >yourself, without other people looking at you weird. You're very lucky, and
    >if you have a daughter, you can even finally get to play with Barbie (don't
    >deny it, you want to).

    I played a lot with a nurse barbie once. Only lasted a month though :-/

    --
    A killfile is a friend for life.

    Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.
  36. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Xocyll <Xocyll@kingston.net> wrote in
    news:gq6m51hg6gpirtsui9c6ntlss5313reu3c@4ax.com:

    > It also let me automate bluewave fido echo downloads.
    >

    Oh yeah, I remember Blue Wave, which was an offline reader for fidonet
    messages. Very cool little reader, I wish they'd have converted into a
    USENET reader ;).

    --

    Knight37 - http://knightgames.blogspot.com
    Once a Gamer, Always a Gamer.
  37. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    knight37 <knight37m@gmail.com> looked up from reading the entrails of
    the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs say:

    >Xocyll <Xocyll@kingston.net> wrote in
    >news:gq6m51hg6gpirtsui9c6ntlss5313reu3c@4ax.com:
    >
    >> It also let me automate bluewave fido echo downloads.
    >>
    >
    >Oh yeah, I remember Blue Wave, which was an offline reader for fidonet
    >messages. Very cool little reader, I wish they'd have converted into a
    >USENET reader ;).

    Oh hell yes.
    When I first started using Agent I REALLY missed bluewave - especially
    so since I first started reading usenet groups via BBS/Bluewave since
    certain select groups were ported over by some local sysops.

    Xocyll
    --
    I don't particularly want you to FOAD, myself. You'll be more of
    a cautionary example if you'll FO And Get Chronically, Incurably,
    Painfully, Progressively, Expensively, Debilitatingly Ill. So
    FOAGCIPPEDI. -- Mike Andrews responding to an idiot in asr
  38. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    Xocyll <Xocyll@kingston.net> wrote in
    news:uomn51p80s5rlpus3ftslah4nt8sta38qr@4ax.com:

    >>> It also let me automate bluewave fido echo downloads.
    >>>
    >>
    >>Oh yeah, I remember Blue Wave, which was an offline reader for fidonet
    >>messages. Very cool little reader, I wish they'd have converted into a
    >>USENET reader ;).
    >
    > Oh hell yes.
    > When I first started using Agent I REALLY missed bluewave - especially
    > so since I first started reading usenet groups via BBS/Bluewave since
    > certain select groups were ported over by some local sysops.

    Yeah, man I wonder if the guy that wrote Blue Wave still has the source
    code. Seems like a great project for sourceforge.

    --

    Knight37 - http://knightgames.blogspot.com
    Once a Gamer, Always a Gamer.
  39. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.rpg (More info?)

    James Garvin <jgarvin2004@comcast.net> wrote in news:gtOdnQkn4ddCmsffRVn-
    vA@comcast.com:

    > I hate that you can't stop it from "detecting" the hardware. It does
    > that with one of my mobos. It keeps on "seeing" the onboard ethernet
    > connection and I DON'T WANT IT! The driver breaks my USB ports!! Quite
    > annoying...

    You can probably disable onboard ethernet in your BIOS.
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