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Router for Security

Tags:
  • Routers
  • NAS / RAID
  • Security
  • Computers
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
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February 13, 2013 12:32:40 PM

Hello,

I am in a situation where I have a computer that gets assigned a static and public IP address by my network administrators, hence I can not change it to private without knocking on many doors.

I have set-up a NAS system on this computer which is not smart as it it essentially accessible to the world, other than minor security measures as in a strong admin password and https enabled, as you can log into the NAS through a web GUI.

If I was to place a router between the computer and the network would this allow me to lock down this computer without going through the hassle of dealing with the IT department.

I would like to be able to access the NAS from certain computers only, and can't have the security threat of people hacking into my NAS.

OR is there another more secure way to do this?

Thanks,
D

More about : router security

February 13, 2013 1:40:51 PM

Is your system joined to your company's domain?
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February 13, 2013 2:00:35 PM

I don't think...How can I test?

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February 13, 2013 3:25:42 PM

Right click My Computer(XP) or Computer(Vista and windows 7) then click properties. You will either see a workgroup name or a domain name. I only ask because if you are in a domain you are going to have very limited, if any, access to adding hardware and changing security settings.
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February 13, 2013 3:44:43 PM

I am not within a Domain. Just classic setting as in "WORKGROUP"
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February 13, 2013 4:19:04 PM

You want to be able to access the NAS within the office or across the internet?
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February 13, 2013 4:25:06 PM

Just in the office.

But if it is possible to do it across the internet that could be a bonus, but not necessary.
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February 13, 2013 6:08:59 PM

Inside the office is easy, just use file sharing and security. I would get with your network admin for help with getting it setup so he/she knows it's out there. I'd want to know about it if it were on my network.

Setting it up for access outside the office would take a lot of setup and config.
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February 15, 2013 11:16:04 AM

I've already been in contact with the network admin because of the problems we are having connecting our computers locally, that is why I've gone with the NAS route, which was even suggested by them, and it makes back-ups easier.

I was just wondering if a router would be a good way to secure access to my NAS, by only letting the IPs of the computers I want to allow access to the NAS.
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February 15, 2013 11:30:24 AM

boogerleys said:
I've already been in contact with the network admin because of the problems we are having connecting our computers locally, that is why I've gone with the NAS route, which was even suggested by them, and it makes back-ups easier.

I was just wondering if a router would be a good way to secure access to my NAS, by only letting the IPs of the computers I want to allow access to the NAS.


find a router or a firewall that allows mac address filtering. You can set it up so only one mac address you assign will be allowed to connect to your NAS box. I'm kind of puzzled why your network admin can't do this for you.
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February 15, 2013 12:27:24 PM

Quote:
I'm kind of puzzled why your network admin can't do this for you.



I agree... He/She should be taking care of everything that gets added/removed on the network.
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February 15, 2013 12:28:05 PM

They don't like to support any non-standard procedures.
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February 15, 2013 12:35:21 PM

So the NAS you are adding isn't for work related storage?
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February 15, 2013 2:12:02 PM

No it is. 100%. The IT department charges a setup cost of $100/GB and a maintenance fee of $4/GB/month for network storage. But we process GBs of data daily. It's an environment where the Network and Systems Department and the IT Department are separate. Each department has to pay for stuff like this.

That's why I need it to be very secure, because I can't have anyone accessing the work data. Yet when you register a new machine with the network, in order to access the internet and network, the MAC address of the machine gets assigned a Public IP. Therefore when I registered the MAC of the test NAS machine it gets assigned a static and public IP.

I was just wondering if a router between the NAS and the Internet would be a robust way to secure the NAS
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February 15, 2013 2:57:26 PM

Either method would work... Configuring a router for mac address filtering or sharing and security, both are secure. If you have a router on hand already give it a shot.
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February 15, 2013 4:58:39 PM

Can you clarify what you mean by Sharing and Security.

The NAS system has it's own OS, and is accessible through a web GUI. The webGUI is the main thing I'm trying to secure.
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February 15, 2013 5:10:00 PM

ahhhh... I figured it to be just a basic nas setup as a network drive connected to your computer. What kind of nas is it and what is the OS running?
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February 15, 2013 5:34:24 PM

The OS is FreeNAS 8.3.0 which is running off a USB key on an older laptop connected to the larger network. I'm using this laptop as a test until I can use a setup like this securely, then I'll find the money to build a good NAS setup, based on FreeNAS.
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