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How to hook up another computer to your modem

Last response: in Networking
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February 14, 2013 1:13:25 PM

Hello,
I have cable I recently ran a cat 5 from my router to my sons com internet runs great but the games he plays lag my router is baout 5 years old its a belkin also need the router to be wireless. any suggestions on what to buy.

More about : hook computer modem

February 14, 2013 2:20:36 PM

joe31171 said:
Hello,
I have cable I recently ran a cat 5 from my router to my sons com internet runs great but the games he plays lag my router is baout 5 years old its a belkin also need the router to be wireless. any suggestions on what to buy.

Would you mind letting us know kind of bandwidth your internet service is providing you with?

Should look like "## Mbps download"

Also, the router / modem model numbers would be useful. If you have that info, maybe I could point you in the right direction.
February 14, 2013 3:55:45 PM

If you are on the economy package from your ISP, chances are you are going to get lag no matter what router you pick up...

Just FWIW, I have no clue what interenet service you have. All I can go by is what I am using, which is current Comcast Extreme 50/10. If I had game induced lag over my internet connection I would be very concerned. Even with 2 consoles playing online, and Facebook stuff, there is still no lag on my network... However if I had the Economy package which if I recall is 3mb download, and 768K up, then yes, I would expect lag no matter my network hardware.

At the way prices stand now I would.

#1. Get a router with 802.11n wireless, multi band capable. (N600, N900 would be ideal).
#2. Gigabit LAN ports. They typical is 4. I believe the Apple Airport models come with 3.
#3. QoS configurable router. You can bump UP or DOWN the network priority for certain types of traffic. If you know what games your son plays that kill your network, you can pull down the priority of the game traffic allowing more bandwidth to be used for other purposes. Mind you, he is going to scream about his game not working right, but that is a different question...

Also if you are on cable, using aa higher speed tier, and your ISP supports it, look at your modem. Is it a current DOCSIS 3.0 modem? A lot of the time the ISPs will upgrade their speed tiers and take customers along the speed upgrade for free, but won't upgrade the modem, leaving customers with modems that don't support the speeds the cable can do. Not to mention you are paying a lease fee more often than not now... So if this applies to you, you might want to reassess your broadband needs, and get service, and a modem to match . (I upgraded to the 50mbps service when I bought my own modem. The service upgrade was the same difference in cost as 2x the modem lease, and my wife wanted the extra bandwidth, not like I was going to argue...
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February 14, 2013 4:12:29 PM

dbhosttexas said:
If you are on the economy package from your ISP, chances are you are going to get lag no matter what router you pick up...

Just FWIW, I have no clue what interenet service you have. All I can go by is what I am using, which is current Comcast Extreme 50/10. If I had game induced lag over my internet connection I would be very concerned. Even with 2 consoles playing online, and Facebook stuff, there is still no lag on my network... However if I had the Economy package which if I recall is 3mb download, and 768K up, then yes, I would expect lag no matter my network hardware.

At the way prices stand now I would.

#1. Get a router with 802.11n wireless, multi band capable. (N600, N900 would be ideal).
#2. Gigabit LAN ports. They typical is 4. I believe the Apple Airport models come with 3.
#3. QoS configurable router. You can bump UP or DOWN the network priority for certain types of traffic. If you know what games your son plays that kill your network, you can pull down the priority of the game traffic allowing more bandwidth to be used for other purposes. Mind you, he is going to scream about his game not working right, but that is a different question...

Also if you are on cable, using aa higher speed tier, and your ISP supports it, look at your modem. Is it a current DOCSIS 3.0 modem? A lot of the time the ISPs will upgrade their speed tiers and take customers along the speed upgrade for free, but won't upgrade the modem, leaving customers with modems that don't support the speeds the cable can do. Not to mention you are paying a lease fee more often than not now... So if this applies to you, you might want to reassess your broadband needs, and get service, and a modem to match . (I upgraded to the 50mbps service when I bought my own modem. The service upgrade was the same difference in cost as 2x the modem lease, and my wife wanted the extra bandwidth, not like I was going to argue...


Plenty of useful info here. I just upped my speed to 30 down and 5 up and purchased my own modem as well. The modem lease will end up costing you a lot more than it is worth in the long run, but your ISP may not even be charging you for it. That, and a lot of them will tie certain in-house support services into the modem lease, so that is something to watch out for. You don't want to be left with no free in-home services if you stop leasing the modem.

Anyway, specific suggestions on what to do will still require some details of the current setup.
February 15, 2013 1:39:07 PM

jrgray93 said:
Plenty of useful info here. I just upped my speed to 30 down and 5 up and purchased my own modem as well. The modem lease will end up costing you a lot more than it is worth in the long run, but your ISP may not even be charging you for it. That, and a lot of them will tie certain in-house support services into the modem lease, so that is something to watch out for. You don't want to be left with no free in-home services if you stop leasing the modem.

Anyway, specific suggestions on what to do will still require some details of the current setup.


I don't disagree here. I am willing, and able to do a lot of things that a good number of other folks just don't seem to have the desire to do. My coax from the union on the outside of the house all the way to my modem was pulled, and tested by me. I used a pre-terminated GE branded coaxial cable. I know for a fact that everything on the house side of the Comcast union is 100% as it should be. The line is dedicated just to Comcast internet (my TV is satelite).

IF you want to do this, it is pretty simple, assuming you are skilled enough to pull cable. (not that difficult, but a bit more DIY than a lot of folks seem to want to do...

I did the following.

#1. Installed a brush type wall plate in my home office wall. This replaced an existing, unused, disconnected telephone jack that still had wire in the wall.
#2. Used the phone wire to back pull a pull string into the attic. I pulled enough pull string to allow the string to travel up and down the wall with whatever cable I wanted. I secured the attic end to a framing member in the attic, and below in the office, I used a large plastic box to keep the string from passing all the way into the wall.
#3. From the office end, I ran a 50' GE Coaxial cable.
#4. Once pulled into the attic, I routed it through my attic, out the soffit, and down the back wall outside of the house.
#5. Finally I disconnected the Union, connected MY new coax, wrapped the end with Coaxial Cable sealant tape. (Radio Shack used to carry this stuff).
#6. Lastly I connected the coax to my modem, and powered it up.

No splitters, no questions about what might be going on with my coax in the attic. Most coaxial systems are such a mess that I am amazed they carry any data, this way, I eliminated the rats nest of confusion that was there when I bought the house. If there are any issues with my system, the odds are 99+ % that it is outside of the union. There isn't much that can go wrong with a single unjoined coax...
!