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Behnirnger monitor radio noise..

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January 13, 2005 7:34:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi,

I have a pair of Behringer Truth B2031's (active), that tend to pick up
and amplify radio interference -- sometimes quite loudly. It wasn't a
problem for me before, but I recently moved to down-town Salt Lake City
-- a much busier environment.

Is there anything I can do to isolate these monitors so they won't pick
up the noise?

--
Dilvie on the web:
- http://www.dilvie.com/
- http://download-electronica.blogspot.com/
- http://movie-trailers.blogspot.com/
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 14, 2005 1:47:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 13 Jan 2005 16:34:08 -0800, "Eric" <dilvie23@gmail.com> wrote:

>Is there anything I can do to isolate these monitors so they won't pick
>up the noise?

How well sealed are the casings? You'll need to improvise some sort
of shielding, inside or out.

Are you using them next to a computer monitor? Are the drivers
effecting the screen?

http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=297

Has a bit about halfway through about how to shield drivers that
aren't.
jtougas

listen- there's a hell of a good universe next door
let's go

e.e. cummings
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 14, 2005 10:57:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1105662848.437470.268570@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> dilvie23@gmail.com writes:

> I have a pair of Behringer Truth B2031's (active), that tend to pick up
> and amplify radio interference -- sometimes quite loudly. It wasn't a
> problem for me before, but I recently moved to down-town Salt Lake City
> -- a much busier environment.
>
> Is there anything I can do to isolate these monitors so they won't pick
> up the noise?

What's the source of interference? Broadcast stations? Radio? TV? AM?
FM? Amateur/CB radio? Taxi/Police radios? Cell phones? Neon signs?

Do you get the interference on anything else in the house? TV sets,
telephones, fillings in your teeth?

You can use shielded cable for your connections (you probably already
are), you can use balanced connections, you can get a power line EMI
filter, you can get a better power line EMI filter, you can move.

Do the speakers pick up radio stations when they're just powered up
and not connected to anything else, or could the problem be somewhere
else in your system?



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Related resources
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 14, 2005 5:09:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 22:47:41 -0500, jtougas
<jatougasNOSPAM@charter.net> wrote:

>>Is there anything I can do to isolate these monitors so they won't pick
>>up the noise?
>
>How well sealed are the casings? You'll need to improvise some sort
>of shielding, inside or out.
>
>Are you using them next to a computer monitor? Are the drivers
>effecting the screen?

I'm not sure screening the speaker will make any difference. The
classic source of radio pickup is a bad plug connection acting as a
diode. Plug the speakers up to something else - is the radio still
there? What about if you monitor on headphones?

If you've moved next door to a transmitter, you may just have to move
again ;-)

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
January 16, 2005 11:04:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Is that the model with the built in FM tuner ??? :-)



Eric <dilvie23@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1105662848.437470.268570@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hi,
>
> I have a pair of Behringer Truth B2031's (active), that tend to pick up
> and amplify radio interference -- sometimes quite loudly. It wasn't a
> problem for me before, but I recently moved to down-town Salt Lake City
> -- a much busier environment.
>
> Is there anything I can do to isolate these monitors so they won't pick
> up the noise?
>
> --
> Dilvie on the web:
> - http://www.dilvie.com/
> - http://download-electronica.blogspot.com/
> - http://movie-trailers.blogspot.com/
>
January 21, 2005 4:19:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

They pick things up things like the microwave, paper shredder, and
miscellanious noises from outside, etc...

They pick up noise when they're not connected to anything, but they
tend to pick up more noise when I have them plugged into my mixer, and
I plug other things into it (even when the mixer input and output
volumes are zero). The mixer in question is an event ez-bus.

--
Dilvie on the web:
- http://www.dilvie.com/
- http://download-electronica.blogspot.com/
- http://movie-trailers.blogspot.com/
January 22, 2005 1:02:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Eric wrote:
> They pick things up things like the microwave, paper shredder, and
> miscellanious noises from outside, etc...
>
> They pick up noise when they're not connected to anything, but they
> tend to pick up more noise when I have them plugged into my mixer,
and
> I plug other things into it (even when the mixer input and output
> volumes are zero). The mixer in question is an event ez-bus.
>
> --
>

Usually RF interference gets into audio equipment via the audio cable
or via the power cables. Check the chassis ground connections on your
input and output cables.

It is unususual for RF to get in directly via the chassis. Usually you
have to be very close (1/2 mile) to the Tx for this to happen.

Mark
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 22, 2005 11:14:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mark" <makolber@yahoo.com> wrote :

> Usually RF interference gets into audio equipment via the audio cable
> or via the power cables. Check the chassis ground connections on your
> input and output cables.
>

Actually sound to me this guy has a probem with bad earthing and conductive
loads dirtying up his 'powergrid'..

--
Bill Gates can't guarantee Windows,
how are you gonna guarantee my safety..
--John Crichton - Farscape pilot
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 22, 2005 11:15:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Paul van der Heu <pvdh@xs4all.nl> wrote :


> Actually sound to me this guy has a probem with bad earthing and
> conductive loads dirtying up his 'powergrid'..

Hmm should be inductive loads, not conductive.. ;) 
--
Bill Gates can't guarantee Windows,
how are you gonna guarantee my safety..
--John Crichton - Farscape pilot
October 1, 2011 3:26:05 AM

Just for posterity -

I had exactly the same problem for ages, its not balanced cables or power conditioners that will fix the problem. I finally found a forum where this question was answered correctly. It is something easy to fix if you are prepared to open the case and void your warranty.

It is the wires between the electronics at the back and the two leds that are at the front of the unit that acts as an antenna. it is easy to open the electronics (with the power cable removed of course), and disconnect this wire.

I opened the case by removing the six screws that connect the STEEL casing to the WOODEN enclosure. There are twelve screws on the back, and the ones that are in the middle of the steel casing (surrounded by settings and diagrams) are NOT the right ones. The ones at the side that screw into wood are the ones that I used to open the casing.

Inside, there are two plugs with 4-5 wires inside, and one has thinner wires (four black one red) and was the right one to disconnect - it was glued a little so I had to carefully prise it out. The other one has larger thicker wires and is connected to the two drivers (do not disconnect this one). I disconnected the small ones and am now happily enjoying much reduced noise (but no leds for power on or overload - boohoo).

As usual - this type of repair is at your own risk - but I had no trouble, and regained the use of quite reasonable monitors.

Cheers
:) 
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
November 27, 2011 11:40:12 AM

I've had the same problem.
Disconnecting the led on the front worked out for me!

Thanx!
April 4, 2012 1:28:22 AM

smfrgsn said:
Just for posterity -

I had exactly the same problem for ages, its not balanced cables or power conditioners that will fix the problem. I finally found a forum where this question was answered correctly. It is something easy to fix if you are prepared to open the case and void your warranty.

It is the wires between the electronics at the back and the two leds that are at the front of the unit that acts as an antenna. it is easy to open the electronics (with the power cable removed of course), and disconnect this wire.

I opened the case by removing the six screws that connect the STEEL casing to the WOODEN enclosure. There are twelve screws on the back, and the ones that are in the middle of the steel casing (surrounded by settings and diagrams) are NOT the right ones. The ones at the side that screw into wood are the ones that I used to open the casing.

Inside, there are two plugs with 4-5 wires inside, and one has thinner wires (four black one red) and was the right one to disconnect - it was glued a little so I had to carefully prise it out. The other one has larger thicker wires and is connected to the two drivers (do not disconnect this one). I disconnected the small ones and am now happily enjoying much reduced noise (but no leds for power on or overload - boohoo).

As usual - this type of repair is at your own risk - but I had no trouble, and regained the use of quite reasonable monitors.

Cheers
:) 



Wow! That worked. Thank you SOOOOOOOOO much. I have the Behringer Truth B2031 and live about 200 yards from a huge radio antenna on an office building. I got constant radio noise through the speakers and couldn't get rid of it. Line conditioning did absolutely nothing. I followed your instructions about disconnecting the wires to the front led and it got rid of about 85% of the radio noise. I then went and put ferrite chokes on the wires going to the speakers and that got rid of the last 15%. I am SO grateful to you :D 


Anonymous
a b C Monitor
October 23, 2012 12:21:49 AM

Removing front and back LED worked for me... Thanks a million:-D
October 23, 2012 5:23:38 PM

Eric said:
Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi,

I have a pair of Behringer Truth B2031's (active), that tend to pick up
and amplify radio interference -- sometimes quite loudly. It wasn't a
problem for me before, but I recently moved to down-town Salt Lake City
-- a much busier environment.

Is there anything I can do to isolate these monitors so they won't pick
up the noise?

--
Dilvie on the web:
- http://www.dilvie.com/
- http://download-electronica.blogspot.com/
- http://movie-trailers.blogspot.com/



RFI Kit

Kit RFI-4 contains ferrite toroids and beads selected to eliminate RFI from 1 to 1000 Mhz. Enough to cure a normal household of RFI.

What causes RFI? Strong signals from nearby amateur radio, CB, FM and other transmitters are picked up by long wires running through the house: electric power wiring, telephone cables. alarm system wires, etc. They feed the signals into the TV, the telephone, and the stereo. Long leads to the stereo speakers do the same. Electronics in these appliances are upset by the RF and you hear the radio transmitter in your telephone and TV and the alarm goes off.

How to cure RFI – Run the wires through ferrite cores right next to the affected appliance (the Tip Sheet gives details). Ferrites do not affect the signals going through the wires but they resist the passage of RF. So they keep the RF out of the appliance and stop the RFI.

What is in the kit? 12 beads with 0.2” holes for small wires and cables, 4 toroid (donut shaped) cores with 1/2” holes, 4 with 3/4” holes, 4 split beads (toroids cut in half so you can put them over cables without disconnecting them). Two of them fit over RG-58 (1/4” hole) and two fit over RG-8 (1/2” hole).

Also included is our RFI Tip Sheet that explains the use of ferrites in detail and tells how to use them to keep RF out of computers, stereos, VCRs, alarm systems, and telephones.

What does it cost? Kit RFI-4 is $35.00 + $8 S&H in U.S. and Canada. (Plus Sales Tax in California.

http://palomar-engineers.com/rfi-kit
January 29, 2014 4:51:42 AM

The LEDs are not the problem in my Behringer Truth 2013a. Disconnecting the LED did nothing to stop the RFI. I also put a choke on the other wires going into the cabinet and a choke on the power cable. None of these stops the RFI. Plugging the speaker in at other outlets in the house doesn't change a thing.
March 25, 2014 5:15:13 PM

I just wanted to chime in on this very same issue that i experienced with my behringer truth speakers. I've been trying for quite a few years not to get ride of the noise that was coming through my speakers. I've done the rectangle rfi ferrite 1" rectangle blocker around the wires inside that go into the box from the amplifier, and still had problems with rf interference. Before that solution i grabbed some bargain bin 1/4" to xlr, in order to get some balanced connections to and from my Roland Quad capture, to the speakers with no success. I just ordered a Vaunix lab brick on a whim hoping that would fix it, and nope didn't work.

Then I realized after rechecking the cables I had going to the speakers, the 1/4" cables were not wired to be balanced. I managed to then after that realization to find some balanced 3 patch cables which were too short to get to both speakers, so i repositioned the quad capture, in the middle of both speakers, directly underneath 2 old lcd monitors, and in front of a 24 inch main lcd monitor. The quad capture is supposed to be really well done from a usb sound isolating aspect, and it is after i fixed the main problem of not having balanced cables connecting the speakers, doh!
!