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Which Router should I buy?

Last response: in Networking
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February 16, 2013 9:20:09 PM

I upgraded my internet to 25 mbs. The problem is I have 4 gaming computers on my system at any given time. When one person downloads something, all the other computers spike to 900 ping until that computer has finished its download. What confuses me is that the downloadee is only at 2 mbs download speed. With my limited arithmetic skills, that means 23 mbs is still available. From what I've read I think I need to try a new router.

Is there a router that will fix this issue? Suggestions are welcomed.

I'm currently using Netgear-N 150 WRN1000.

More about : router buy

February 17, 2013 3:09:59 AM

shuai_ma said:
I upgraded my internet to 25 mbs. The problem is I have 4 gaming computers on my system at any given time. When one person downloads something, all the other computers spike to 900 ping until that computer has finished its download. What confuses me is that the downloadee is only at 2 mbs download speed. With my limited arithmetic skills, that means 23 mbs is still available. From what I've read I think I need to try a new router.

Is there a router that will fix this issue? Suggestions are welcomed.

I'm currently using Netgear-N 150 WRN1000.


4 quick questions to help answer yours.

#1. How are your machines connecting to the router? What standard are they using? (For example, wired ethernet 10baseT, Wireless ethernet 802.11g etc...)
#2. What are your priorities in the next couple of years for your router? (How many systems do you see connecting and how, also do you see yourself attaching a printer or USB hard disk to share / stream media with?).
#3. What's your budget for an upgrade?
#4. Do you have any particular brand loyalties or dislikes?
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February 17, 2013 3:51:43 AM

1. The machines which require the most bandwidth are wired Ethernet.. Although I don't quite know what 10baseT is. I have 1 Mac laptop, 2 kindles, Cell phone (GS3) and one other computer that uses wireless sporatically (Not used much), and 1 Smart TV connected wirelessly.
[I should note that the wireless devices are actually connected to the router
1/10th as much as the wired ones]

2. Priorities in the next couple years would be to expand the ability of the router to be able to take on more, as I assume my family will desire more devices, not less.

3. I'd like to say that price isn't an issue. But if the price goes about $300.00 that would be about as far as I would go.

4. No brand loyalties as far as routers go.
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February 18, 2013 12:39:30 AM

A little reading for you on the 10BaseT thing, or as they show it, 10Base-T, It's an ethernet speed standard. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet_over_twisted_pair

Now as far as the remainder of your answers go, not knowing your infrastructure, but taking a W.A.G. at it, I will say you probably don't have category 6 cabling yet, so upgrading there should be in your to do list as well...

While your current needs won't hardly tax the router I presently own, a Cisco / Linksys EA2700, I don't recommend them moving forward. Cisco sold off their home networking business to concentrate on Enterprise level stuff, and they sold their Linksys division to Belkin. I honestly do NOT like their stuff from a quality standpoint. This is just my opinion, don't take it for gospel, but from my perspective (I have been working in I.T. for 15 years now). Belkin makes things that look nice, but work poorly.

So what do I recommend you might ask?

I am seeing a LOT of positive reports on the Netgear R6300 ($199.00 at Amazon). This router features 4 gigabit uplink ports, 802.11ac simultaenous dual band 1750mbps WiFi, usb, DNLA, etc...

Likewise, for maybe $10.00 or so less, the Asus RT-AC66U is getting tons of very positive feedback.

The drawback to those two routers is also their advantage. The WiFi technology they use isn't "final release" but instead "draft", which means it is possible it will change. If past history is any indicator though, once final of the AC standard is released, the MFGs will release firmware updates to comply with the standard.

If you aren't comfortable with bleeding edge technology, an N900 router such as the Netgear WNDR5400 $149.99 on Amazon, or the Asus RT-N66U offers all the same benefits of the prior mentioned models, but featuring the Wireless N simultaneous dual band 900mbps standard.

It's a VERY hard choice to recommend one over the other. The AC1750 would be nice in the next few years, but there is some risk to it. The final release of the standard may be beyond what the MFG wants to support, and updated firmware might not be in the offerings.

With the N900 standard, it is already established, and most client connections haven't caught up with the speed. (N900 adapters are rare. N300 is what I see the most of...)

Just in case you are wondering, I mentioned my "current" router above. I want to upgrade to one with DNLA support / usb connectors, and even though I like the Asus, I am personally leaning toward the Netgear for my next router...

If it weren't for the selling out of Linksys to Belkin, I would hop on a Cisco / Linksys EA4500 as my first choice. I honestly fear for that company and the quality of the products and support over the next few years.
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February 18, 2013 8:10:39 AM

Thank you, I really appreciate the input and info. I hope that one of these will solve my problem. If you look back at this thread, would you mind giving me your opinion on if my problem of the 2 mbs download speed clogging up my 25 mbs internet is the router?

Again, I really appreciate the input.
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February 18, 2013 8:10:47 AM

Best answer selected by shuai_ma.
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