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I think I need to replace our wireless router

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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December 30, 2012 12:10:36 PM

Hello,
We have an older Netgear router that's 4 or more years old. It was the $30 or so special from Staples. We are running the following...my laptop is hardwired next to it on the desk (my wireless is disabled), my wife's laptop is using the wireless. We occasionally run an ipod touch sitting in a GigaWare speaker system for room music. I have just bought a device for streaming video to the tv. It's specs says it connects thru the 802.11b/g/n networks. I know we have to be careful of trying to run too many devices at once especially the streaming devices. She is often asking me to reset the router so she can connect. Once a day oft times. Do I need to simply replace the router with a new one of similar specs or would a dual band router be advised? As far as I know our only dual band devices are the RCA streaming device and her Kindle Fire HD (which she seldom uses). I bought a new Linksys E2500 sitting here unopened that I bought 2 nights ago, wondering if it's more than I need.
December 30, 2012 12:22:14 PM

You might get some benefit running the dual band because this router has 2 radios and you could then offload that traffic the 5g radio leaving more bandwidth for the 2.4g.

The nasty thing people find when they upgrade routers to some new fancy router is the oldest devices they own controls what the router can do. If you need to use even a single G device you will have to give up most the performance feature N provides. The only way to get the maximum performance is to run the device in N only mode with B and G support disabled.

Now if you old router partially works you could use that as a G only device and move all your other devices to the new router.

The router you bought is a medium level router anyway you are not going to save a real lot by trying to get a router with fewer features. You can always buy tp-link and get the same type of features less money. Dual band routers with 2x2 mimo (ie 300m) are pretty much the standard thing people are buying.
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December 30, 2012 3:49:16 PM

Open the new router and use it you will have much better service with it. I have the E4200 and it works just fine. I try to run wires and connect that way and leave just those devices that need to be moved around to the wireless that way your not limiting all the devices to the G band. The model I have you can designate each band seperatly so you can set the 2.4 ghz as a mix of b/g/n and set the 5 ghz as N only and the E2500 may have that same option.
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December 30, 2012 4:31:23 PM

I appreciate the quick responses. I'm a little computer literate but not a lot. I hadn't heard of TP-Link but I see good reviews on sites like Amazon. Are they a good (or good enough) quality device?
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December 30, 2012 8:12:54 PM

They are just cheaper because they are not as well known. In most cases they use the exact same broadcom chips almost every other manufacture uses. If you dig you can find the details on the chips for most any router.

Really the main advantage to large brands is you have more people that could have had problems with them before you. You will find more people to help you. Other than that they pretty much are all the same.

In your case I don't know if I would go to the trouble to return the one you have to save the couple of dollars to get a tp-link.
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December 30, 2012 10:36:47 PM

My wife wanted to go back out to Target this afternoon (where I bought it) so I went ahead and returned it. I'm going to do a bit more studying and learn more about these things.

"The nasty thing people find when they upgrade routers to some new fancy router is the oldest devices they own controls what the router can do. If you need to use even a single G device you will have to give up most the performance feature N provides. The only way to get the maximum performance is to run the device in N only mode with B and G support disabled."

This is new stuff to me--so if I buy a new N type router should I run my older router as well and try to assign different devices to specific routers?

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December 30, 2012 10:45:19 PM

You can set the 2.4 ghz as a mix of b/g/n and set the 5 ghz as N only and that would let the devices with a G adapter connect to the 2.4 ghz frequency and the nrwer devices can connect to the 5 ghz frequency and get the better speeds.
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January 9, 2013 11:52:11 PM

I ended up buying a TP-Link dual band. I'm happy with it. Many thanks to all who helped me with my question!
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