Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

PC Recording vs Standalone multitrack recording

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 2:46:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi

For recording an acoustic guitar and vocals, what would be the pros and cons
of using each method above?
Does the sound quality actually differ when using your soundcard to capture
the sound rather than a standalone recorder?
In terms of setup, can you do everything you would want with a pc and
software like a standalone recorder?

Thanks and regards
Mike
January 17, 2005 2:46:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I have recorded quite extensively on my PC with steinbergs Cubase
VST/32 and some cheap dynamic mics through a Behringher 4 channel mixer
into a soundblaster Live! pci card just using a RCA to stereo mini
adaptor on the Line-In on the sound card. the sound quality isn't the
greatest, but you can do so much more with the mixing on a comp.
the major downside is that you can only record 2 tracks at once, so you
gotta mix down to 2 is you wanna do anything "live" with a full
band...so in essence, the PC is the way to go in my opinion if you're a
"solo artist" but with a full band, you gotta get a better interfacing
card with more inputs, or a standalone multitracker!
Peace
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 2:50:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Considerably

Bob

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:w1DGd.1861$bo3.737@newsfe2-win.ntli.net...
> Hi
>
> For recording an acoustic guitar and vocals, what would be the pros and
cons
> of using each method above?
> Does the sound quality actually differ when using your soundcard to
capture
> the sound rather than a standalone recorder?
> In terms of setup, can you do everything you would want with a pc and
> software like a standalone recorder?
>
> Thanks and regards
> Mike
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 3:57:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

You upload the files from the recorder to the computer to edit them, that is
the same in either case. Most low end multitrackers can only record two
tracks at a time.

Bob

"Luke" <fdm_lukehansen@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1105920938.791925.133830@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I have recorded quite extensively on my PC with steinbergs Cubase
> VST/32 and some cheap dynamic mics through a Behringher 4 channel mixer
> into a soundblaster Live! pci card just using a RCA to stereo mini
> adaptor on the Line-In on the sound card. the sound quality isn't the
> greatest, but you can do so much more with the mixing on a comp.
> the major downside is that you can only record 2 tracks at once, so you
> gotta mix down to 2 is you wanna do anything "live" with a full
> band...so in essence, the PC is the way to go in my opinion if you're a
> "solo artist" but with a full band, you gotta get a better interfacing
> card with more inputs, or a standalone multitracker!
> Peace
>
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 9:51:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <w1DGd.1861$bo3.737@newsfe2-win.ntli.net> mikeazzo22@hotmail.com writes:

> For recording an acoustic guitar and vocals, what would be the pros and cons
> of using each method above?

It doesn't matter much what you're recording. What's more important is
how you record. If you need to assemble the vocal phrase by phrase,
then a computer would be the best way to do that. Otherwise, it
probably doesn't matter, though I think that the right stand-alone
recorder can allow you to work smoother than the wrong computer setup.

> Does the sound quality actually differ when using your soundcard to capture
> the sound rather than a standalone recorder?

The sound quality of the recording is almost entirely dependent on the
quality of the A/D converter. If your A/D converter is the one built
into your $20 sound card, you can expect that not to sound as good as
the A/D converter built into, say, a Radar equipped with the S-Nyquist
I/O cards. But buy a $500 sound card and you can get pretty close.

> In terms of setup, can you do everything you would want with a pc and
> software like a standalone recorder?

If you have enough patience, yes.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 3:15:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

well this is my soundcard:

http://www.soundblaster.com/products/audigy2/

so I dont know if its any good for A/D Converting.


"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1105925467k@trad...
>
> In article <w1DGd.1861$bo3.737@newsfe2-win.ntli.net>
> mikeazzo22@hotmail.com writes:
>
>> For recording an acoustic guitar and vocals, what would be the pros and
>> cons
>> of using each method above?
>
> It doesn't matter much what you're recording. What's more important is
> how you record. If you need to assemble the vocal phrase by phrase,
> then a computer would be the best way to do that. Otherwise, it
> probably doesn't matter, though I think that the right stand-alone
> recorder can allow you to work smoother than the wrong computer setup.
>
>> Does the sound quality actually differ when using your soundcard to
>> capture
>> the sound rather than a standalone recorder?
>
> The sound quality of the recording is almost entirely dependent on the
> quality of the A/D converter. If your A/D converter is the one built
> into your $20 sound card, you can expect that not to sound as good as
> the A/D converter built into, say, a Radar equipped with the S-Nyquist
> I/O cards. But buy a $500 sound card and you can get pretty close.
>
>> In terms of setup, can you do everything you would want with a pc and
>> software like a standalone recorder?
>
> If you have enough patience, yes.
>
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
> However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
> lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
> you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
> and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 3:15:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:x%NGd.117$751.61@newsfe1-win.ntli.net
> well this is my soundcard:
>
> http://www.soundblaster.com/products/audigy2/
>
> so I dont know if its any good for A/D Converting.
>

It beats a kick in the head.

One approach is to live with it for a while, adding other stuff like a good
mixer with at least fair mic preamps in it.

When you really start hating the SB, if that happens, you'll have some
serious ideas about what your next audio interface should be like.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 4:48:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks for all the advice guys. I'll try hooking up a Behringer mixer to my
soundcard and see what is sounds like!

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:p 6GdnQp_md2qIHbcRVn-ow@comcast.com...
> "Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:x%NGd.117$751.61@newsfe1-win.ntli.net
>> well this is my soundcard:
>>
>> http://www.soundblaster.com/products/audigy2/
>>
>> so I dont know if its any good for A/D Converting.
>>
>
> It beats a kick in the head.
>
> One approach is to live with it for a while, adding other stuff like a
> good mixer with at least fair mic preamps in it.
>
> When you really start hating the SB, if that happens, you'll have some
> serious ideas about what your next audio interface should be like.
>
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 5:54:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <x%NGd.117$751.61@newsfe1-win.ntli.net> mikeazzo22@hotmail.com writes:

> well this is my soundcard:
> http://www.soundblaster.com/products/audigy2/
>
> so I dont know if its any good for A/D Converting.

Why worry about it? Make some recordings and find out. I'd guess that
it's OK, considering what else you're working with and what's in you
plan.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:w1DGd.1861$bo3.737@newsfe2-win.ntli.net...
> Hi
>
> For recording an acoustic guitar and vocals, what would be the pros and
> cons of using each method above?
> Does the sound quality actually differ when using your soundcard to
> capture the sound rather than a standalone recorder?
> In terms of setup, can you do everything you would want with a pc and
> software like a standalone recorder?

Depends on teh soundcard, and depends on the multitrack recorder. Both can
be equally good or bad.

geoff
January 17, 2005 7:39:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

you might also want to consider some noise isolation of the computer
fan, which generates a significant amount of noise. A few acoustic
pannels, or some rock-wool in a suitable frame would make a big
difference if you are recording anywhere near the computer.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<chris@chris-melchior.com> wrote in message
news:1105940567.986757.107740@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com

> you might also want to consider some noise isolation of the computer
> fan, which generates a significant amount of noise. A few acoustic
> panels, or some rock-wool in a suitable frame would make a big
> difference if you are recording anywhere near the computer.

Actually, most really noisy computers are noisy because they overachieve in
the fan department. Careful and creative use of one or more Zalman Fanmates
(under $10, usually $5 or less each) can help a lot. Just becareful not to
turn your fans down so low that your PC overheats.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks for all the advice!

My setup is currently using an Audigy soundcard, and Magix Music Maker to do
the recording. I will be testing out 2 shure mics (57 and 58), this week. (I
know that condenser mics will be better sounding)

I think i wasn't clear before but I mean I will be using the PC to do the
recording straight through either the line in or mic in.
Am I right in thinking I will need a mixer with a pre-amp mic and hook the
mixer up to the soundcard? What cable would be needed?

Thanks
Mike
"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:65-dnTccq9THOXbcRVn-3g@comcast.com...
> <chris@chris-melchior.com> wrote in message
> news:1105940567.986757.107740@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com
>
>> you might also want to consider some noise isolation of the computer
>> fan, which generates a significant amount of noise. A few acoustic
>> panels, or some rock-wool in a suitable frame would make a big
>> difference if you are recording anywhere near the computer.
>
> Actually, most really noisy computers are noisy because they overachieve
> in the fan department. Careful and creative use of one or more Zalman
> Fanmates (under $10, usually $5 or less each) can help a lot. Just
> becareful not to turn your fans down so low that your PC overheats.
>
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:CCNGd.97$751.77@newsfe1-win.ntli.net

> Am I right in thinking I will need a mixer with a pre-amp mic and
> hook the mixer up to the soundcard?

Yes.

>What cable would be needed?

Which mixer, which soundard?
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <CCNGd.97$751.77@newsfe1-win.ntli.net> mikeazzo22@hotmail.com writes:

> My setup is currently using an Audigy soundcard, and Magix Music Maker to do
> the recording. I will be testing out 2 shure mics (57 and 58), this week. (I
> know that condenser mics will be better sounding)

You know, you can do an OK job with this if you just get some sort of
mic preamp so you don't need to use the microphone input on the
Audigy. That's clearly the weakest link. Consider a used small Mackie
mixer. You should be able to find a 1202 VLZ Pro used for $250 or so.
That will give you four mic inputs with phantom power, eight line
inputs (all convenient so you won't have to dig behind your computer
to connect something) and a convenient control of your monitors.

Record some stuff and start learning. After a while, you'll realize
where you need to expand and that will help you to make a decision as
to which direction to go.

> Am I right in thinking I will need a mixer with a pre-amp mic and hook the
> mixer up to the soundcard? What cable would be needed?

For a mixer like the Mackie 1202, you'll need a couple of cables with
a stereo mini plug on the sound card end and two RCA plugs on the
other end, plus a handful of RCA-1/4" adapters.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

the SB Audigy and probably a behringer 1002

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:-5KdnRXpIO10O3bcRVn-vw@comcast.com...
> "Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:CCNGd.97$751.77@newsfe1-win.ntli.net
>
>> Am I right in thinking I will need a mixer with a pre-amp mic and
>> hook the mixer up to the soundcard?
>
> Yes.
>
>>What cable would be needed?
>
> Which mixer, which soundard?
>
>
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:wQNGd.114$751.93@newsfe1-win.ntli.net
>
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:-5KdnRXpIO10O3bcRVn-vw@comcast.com...
>> "Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:CCNGd.97$751.77@newsfe1-win.ntli.net
>>
>>> Am I right in thinking I will need a mixer with a pre-amp mic and
>>> hook the mixer up to the soundcard?
>>
>> Yes.
>>
>>> What cable would be needed?
>>
>> Which mixer, which soundard?

> the SB Audigy and probably a behringer 1002

My MXB1002 is someplace else right now but I'm pretty sure its main outs are
1/4 phone jacks. They're TRS but since the Audigy is unbalanced in, we'll
treat them like they are unbalanced 1/4", which I know for sure causes no
grief.

So, you get the standard dual RCA to 3.5 mm stereo mini headphone jack
cable, and two 1/4" to RCA adaptors, and plug everything together the only
way everything fits together. Run you under $10 at Radio Shack unless you
succumb to the gold-plated cable. Available lots of other places too,
although the 1/4 to RCA adaptors probably aren't found at Best Buy, even
though the cable is. The adaptors probably require a trip to a true
electronics parts/PA/Ham store like your friendly neighborhood Jameco
distributor or a good music/pro audio store like Guitar Center.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi Arny

I got a sinking feeling with my soundcard. I dont think it does sterio line
in. I hooked my semi acoustic guitar to it through the MIC in and its in
sterio. When I hook the guitar up to the Line In, it only comes out of one
speaker. I checked the specs on the card:

Sound Blaster Audigy® 2 On-Board Connectors
a.. Line level out (Front / Rear / Center / Subwoofer /Rear Center)
b.. Digital Out for 5.1 support (6-channel SPDIF Output)
c.. Line in
d.. Microphone in
e.. FireWire port
f.. Telephone Answering Device in
g.. Analog / Digital CD Audio in
h.. 15-pin MIDI / Joystick port extension header
i.. Internal Firewire header to Sound Blaster Audigy 2 Internal Drive
(Upgrade Option*)
j.. AD_EXT extension header to the Sound Blaster Audigy 2 Internal Drive
(Upgrade Option*)
* Upgrade not yet available for sale seperately
Sound Blaster Audigy® 2 Platinum Internal Drive Front Panel Connectors
(Sound Blaster Audigy 2 Platinum ONLY)
a.. Headphone Out (1/4" Stereo Jack with Volume control)
b.. Line In 2 (1/4" Stereo Jack, shared with Microphone In 2)
c.. Microphone In 2 (1/4" Jack with Gain control)
d.. MIDI In (mini DIN)
e.. MIDI Out (mini DIN)
f.. Optical SPDIF In and Out
g.. Coaxial SPDIF In and Out
h.. Stereo Auxiliary In (2 x RCA/Coaxial Jack)
i.. Firewire port
j.. Infra-red Receiver
Now I dont have the Platunum edition (only the on board connectors), so is
it safe to say that if I hook up a mixer to the line in, I wont get sterio?

Thanks in advance
Mike

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:o dGdnYjyMrzFLnbcRVn-sg@comcast.com...
> "Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:wQNGd.114$751.93@newsfe1-win.ntli.net
>>
>> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
>> news:-5KdnRXpIO10O3bcRVn-vw@comcast.com...
>>> "Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:CCNGd.97$751.77@newsfe1-win.ntli.net
>>>
>>>> Am I right in thinking I will need a mixer with a pre-amp mic and
>>>> hook the mixer up to the soundcard?
>>>
>>> Yes.
>>>
>>>> What cable would be needed?
>>>
>>> Which mixer, which soundard?
>
>> the SB Audigy and probably a behringer 1002
>
> My MXB1002 is someplace else right now but I'm pretty sure its main outs
> are 1/4 phone jacks. They're TRS but since the Audigy is unbalanced in,
> we'll treat them like they are unbalanced 1/4", which I know for sure
> causes no grief.
>
> So, you get the standard dual RCA to 3.5 mm stereo mini headphone jack
> cable, and two 1/4" to RCA adaptors, and plug everything together the only
> way everything fits together. Run you under $10 at Radio Shack unless you
> succumb to the gold-plated cable. Available lots of other places too,
> although the 1/4 to RCA adaptors probably aren't found at Best Buy, even
> though the cable is. The adaptors probably require a trip to a true
> electronics parts/PA/Ham store like your friendly neighborhood Jameco
> distributor or a good music/pro audio store like Guitar Center.
>
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:qgQGd.538$nP2.261@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net
> Hi Arny
>
> I got a sinking feeling with my soundcard. I dont think it does
> stereo line in. I hooked my semi acoustic guitar to it through the
> MIC in and its in sterio. When I hook the guitar up to the Line In,
> it only comes out of one speaker. I checked the specs on the card:

I'm pretty familair with the Live! series, the Audigy and the Audigy 2.

As designed and frequently delivered, they have stereo line inputs.

IOW if you plug a stereo 3.5 mm plug into the blue jack, and apply
appropriate and similar audio to the plug's tip and the ring, and have the
card and its mixer set up right, you get output from both of the outputs on
the green jack.

IOW, your Audigy 2 is either broken, or you're not using it *right*.
However, given all the options, using it *right* is not a slam dunk.

RTFM and keep trying! ;-)
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks again for the response.
Maybe my test was not a fair one with the picup from my acoustic guitar.
I even used the monitoring software from Magik Music Maker to check the
signal and its only mono, but with the MIC in, it was in sterio. Strange.
Well I'll get my mixer anyway and see how it goes.
Thanks again

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:2oqdnV8N8rxvSXbcRVn-sQ@comcast.com...
> "Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:qgQGd.538$nP2.261@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net
>> Hi Arny
>>
>> I got a sinking feeling with my soundcard. I dont think it does
>> stereo line in. I hooked my semi acoustic guitar to it through the
>> MIC in and its in sterio. When I hook the guitar up to the Line In,
>> it only comes out of one speaker. I checked the specs on the card:
>
> I'm pretty familair with the Live! series, the Audigy and the Audigy 2.
>
> As designed and frequently delivered, they have stereo line inputs.
>
> IOW if you plug a stereo 3.5 mm plug into the blue jack, and apply
> appropriate and similar audio to the plug's tip and the ring, and have the
> card and its mixer set up right, you get output from both of the outputs
> on the green jack.
>
> IOW, your Audigy 2 is either broken, or you're not using it *right*.
> However, given all the options, using it *right* is not a slam dunk.
>
> RTFM and keep trying! ;-)
>
>
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 7:39:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:FDQGd.561$nP2.42@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net

> thanks again for the response.

> Maybe my test was not a fair one with the picup from my acoustic
> guitar.

Agreed.

> I even used the monitoring software from Magik Music Maker to
> check the signal and its only mono, but with the MIC in, it was in
> stereo.

> Strange. Well I'll get my mixer anyway and see how it goes.
> Thanks again

Forgot this important tidbit: Not strange. The mic input on these cards is
mono - drives both channels equally.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 8:02:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2005-01-16, Mike Azzopardi <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote:

> For recording an acoustic guitar and vocals, what would be the pros and cons
> of using each method above?
> Does the sound quality actually differ when using your soundcard to capture
> the sound rather than a standalone recorder?


What sound card, compared to what standalone recorder?

Remember, the standalone recorder is usually also your mixer, preamp,
and control surface with shuttle, faders, eq, and meters. So when
comparing, also compare what you'll be using for each of those
components, which might be "none", or might be just "mixer and preamp".

If you don't have a bunch of other audio stuff you want to do on the
computer, a standalone recorder will certainly be a lot simpler, less
fiddly, and if you're starting from scratch, probably less expensive.

As far as sound quality is concerned, the main difference between all of
them is in the Analog-to-Digital conversion stage. Some devices are
really lousy, others are really excellent and completely transparent.
Fortunately this tends to be a "get what you pay for" attribute,
throughout the spectrum of digital audio.

Are you looking for the same workflow we had with cassette portastudios,
but with digital fidelity? That's not expensive or hard to find these days,
in a standalone.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 8:06:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2005-01-17, Mike Azzopardi <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote:

> I think i wasn't clear before but I mean I will be using the PC to do the
> recording straight through either the line in or mic in.

Ewwww, no. no no no.

> Am I right in thinking I will need a mixer with a pre-amp mic and hook the
> mixer up to the soundcard? What cable would be needed?

Yeah. You're on the kind of budget that is Behringer's stock in trade.
The mix bus on pretty much all Behringer mixers can be taken at a stereo
RCA pair. So, I suppose that means you need an RCA-plug-pair to 1/8" plug?

Not the best stuff, but it will get the job done.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 8:07:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2005-01-17, Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote:

> My MXB1002 is someplace else right now but I'm pretty sure its main outs are
> 1/4 phone jacks. They're TRS but since the Audigy is unbalanced in, we'll
> treat them like they are unbalanced 1/4", which I know for sure causes no
> grief.

Most Behringers have an RCA tape out that's useful for this sort of
thing also.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 8:27:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2005-01-17, Mike Azzopardi <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> well this is my soundcard:
>
> http://www.soundblaster.com/products/audigy2/
>
> so I dont know if its any good for A/D Converting.

Surprisingly good, actually. At the core is the same circuit that's
used in some pretty expensive sound devices. But it's meant for the
consumer end of the market (playback, entertainment, and gaming), and
that may or may not be a problem if you're using it for producing music,
but it will get the job done. For $80 these cards are better than they
have any right to be.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 8:53:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

James

Thanks for the reply. Heres what im gonna do:

Hookup my shure MIC to a Behringer Mixer and then plug the mixer into the
line in of my Audigy 2 soundcard and use the Music Maker software to record.
If this doesn't sound any good, I'll probably end up getting a small Boss
Recorder and use that instead of my soundcard and PC.

Should be ok afaik.

Thanks for all the tips!

Mike

"james of tucson" <fishbowl@radagast.home.conservatory.com> wrote in message
news:slrncunrsp.fb.fishbowl@radagast.home.conservatory.com...
> On 2005-01-16, Mike Azzopardi <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> For recording an acoustic guitar and vocals, what would be the pros and
>> cons
>> of using each method above?
>> Does the sound quality actually differ when using your soundcard to
>> capture
>> the sound rather than a standalone recorder?
>
>
> What sound card, compared to what standalone recorder?
>
> Remember, the standalone recorder is usually also your mixer, preamp,
> and control surface with shuttle, faders, eq, and meters. So when
> comparing, also compare what you'll be using for each of those
> components, which might be "none", or might be just "mixer and preamp".
>
> If you don't have a bunch of other audio stuff you want to do on the
> computer, a standalone recorder will certainly be a lot simpler, less
> fiddly, and if you're starting from scratch, probably less expensive.
>
> As far as sound quality is concerned, the main difference between all of
> them is in the Analog-to-Digital conversion stage. Some devices are
> really lousy, others are really excellent and completely transparent.
> Fortunately this tends to be a "get what you pay for" attribute,
> throughout the spectrum of digital audio.
>
> Are you looking for the same workflow we had with cassette portastudios,
> but with digital fidelity? That's not expensive or hard to find these
> days,
> in a standalone.
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 9:01:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <PYSGd.678$nP2.308@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net> mikeazzo22@hotmail.com writes:

> Thanks for the reply. Heres what im gonna do:
>
> Hookup my shure MIC to a Behringer Mixer and then plug the mixer into the
> line in of my Audigy 2 soundcard and use the Music Maker software to record.
> If this doesn't sound any good, I'll probably end up getting a small Boss
> Recorder and use that instead of my soundcard and PC.

Well, if it doesn't sound good, a Boss recorder won't sound any better
unless the reason it didn't sound good was because you hooked it up
wrong or were operating it incorrectly. If it doesn't sound good, it's
going to be mostly because of your mic placement, your microphones,
your mixer, and lastly your sound card.

Just buying equipment doesn't make bad recordings sound good. Making
bad recordings sound better takes experience. Buying good equipment
makes good recordings sound better.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 2:34:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike

Thats about the best advice I've ever had in my short term recording carear

"Just buying equipment doesn't make bad recordings sound good. Making
bad recordings sound better takes experience. Buying good equipment
makes good recordings sound better."

Thank you!


"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1105994235k@trad...
>
> In article <PYSGd.678$nP2.308@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net> mikeazzo22@hotmail.com
> writes:
>
>> Thanks for the reply. Heres what im gonna do:
>>
>> Hookup my shure MIC to a Behringer Mixer and then plug the mixer into the
>> line in of my Audigy 2 soundcard and use the Music Maker software to
>> record.
>> If this doesn't sound any good, I'll probably end up getting a small Boss
>> Recorder and use that instead of my soundcard and PC.
>
> Well, if it doesn't sound good, a Boss recorder won't sound any better
> unless the reason it didn't sound good was because you hooked it up
> wrong or were operating it incorrectly. If it doesn't sound good, it's
> going to be mostly because of your mic placement, your microphones,
> your mixer, and lastly your sound card.
>
> Just buying equipment doesn't make bad recordings sound good. Making
> bad recordings sound better takes experience. Buying good equipment
> makes good recordings sound better.
>
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
> However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
> lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
> you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
> and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 10:46:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:CCNGd.97$751.77@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
> thanks for all the advice!
>
> My setup is currently using an Audigy soundcard, and Magix Music Maker to
> do the recording. I will be testing out 2 shure mics (57 and 58), this
> week. (I know that condenser mics will be better sounding)
>
> I think i wasn't clear before but I mean I will be using the PC to do the
> recording straight through either the line in or mic in.
> Am I right in thinking I will need a mixer with a pre-amp mic and hook the
> mixer up to the soundcard? What cable would be needed?


That will be very compromised. Soundcard mic preamps such as yours are
pretty poor quality. You really need an external one ( even an 'economy'
mixer will be an improvement), and use your line in.

geoff
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 10:52:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Azzopardi" <mikeazzo22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:qgQGd.538$nP2.261@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
> Hi Arny
>
> I got a sinking feeling with my soundcard. I dont think it does sterio
> line in. I hooked my semi acoustic guitar to it through the MIC in and its
> in sterio. When I hook the guitar up to the Line In, it only comes out of
> one speaker. I checked the specs on the card:

If you are using a 3.5mm mini-jack, then cahnces are the mic input is mono
(but panned equally to both channels). Putting that plug into the line
input connects the active tip to the L channel, and the R channel is
grounded by the plug's sleeve.

You need a stereo jack plug, witht he signal wired tot he tip and ring, or
record the mono signal into your application and pan it.

BUT there is more. A line input is NOT suitable for direct connection to a
guitar. You need a DI box for this, that offers the correct high impedence
and sensitivity for a guitar output.

geoff
!