Acronis True Image Home 2010 and Windows 7 x64 Pro

Hey,

My computer is in a state of "CLEAN" Perfect condition with all the peripherals installed, softwares, updates ect.

In case of future impending disasters which I cannot predict or prevent.

I'm going to use a hard drive image/clone software to backup the clean state so I can overwrite the disaster states in the future.

I m a old fan of GHOST, however, recent years, ghost went down hill.


I did some research and thinking of buying Acronis True Image 2010. I have Windows 7 Professional 64 bit installed.

The internet comments are mixed, some people say it's horrible, some say it does it's job well.

My purpose is to create a image and use it when something goes wrong.

Is there any issues with Acronis True Image 2010? Compatibility? Software issues? Features? Ease to use?

Please tell me your experience.
15 answers Last reply
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  1. Why not use Win 7's own Backup/Image utility? It works fine and you've already paid for it.
    And create a System Repair Disk while you're doing your final housekeeping chores.

    Control Panel -> Backup and Restore -> Create a system image.
    Or type in backup at the Start Menu search bar
  2. Is it reliable?

    Can I access it from the boot menu with the recovery disk?

    My whole purpose it in case of Martian invasion that left me stranded on the boot menu, I will use the original recovery disk to access the image I created when Martians were still hibernating. Log back to Win 7 like the Invasion never happened and invade Mars before they hit me.

    :) People dislike my analogies.

    Does it do that?
  3. Amaranthen said:
    I m a old fan of GHOST, however, recent years, ghost went down hill.


    Ghost was a bomb until Norton bought PowerQuest and grabbed their "DriveImage" technology. Of course w/o the PQ technical expertise, they quickly enough drove it into the ground opening the window for....

    The new standard is Shadow Protect Desktop

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2254465,00.asp

    has 30 day free trial

    http://www.storagecraft.com/downloads/desktopdownload.php


  4. I think it does exactly that.

    Until recently I was using multiple installations of Win7 (64 and 32bit) and would re-install an image on a regular basis while testing with older programs. I never had a problem.
  5. Haha :) Mars attack, I was thinking H.G Wells War of the Worlds. Where a virus crippled the Mars attack.

    I can access the image from the recovery disk/installation disk right?

    I don't know how to unpack the Windows 7 image, how does it work?

    Old Ghost 8.1, I use it from DOS-MS from partially installed Windows 98.

    Then I run a few command prompt.
  6. Amaranthen

    Best backup software I've used ... Acronis has got me out of trouble a number of times over the years.

    You can use it to acess the image and take off a single file if required.

    You can use it when you repalce your harddrive with a larger unit especially if the old unit has failed or has corrupted data. If you play around with dual booting and kill the MBR just start again.

    All too easy ... except you need to factor in a USB harddrive to store the image out of harms way, away from theft, fire etc etc. Don't create and store the image on the same hard drive or even another harddrive in the same computer.

    Get a USB harddrive big enough to take at least a couple of images so you can always get back to a "clean" image depending on the problem(s).
  7. WR2> Why not use Win 7's own Backup/Image utility? It works fine and you've already paid for it.

    Amaranthen> Is it reliable? Can I access it from the boot menu with the recovery disk?

    I've tested the native Win7 image backup and restore a few times and it's always worked perfectly for me. You make a backup to (for example) an external hard drive, and from within the backup utility you can also burn a bootable restore CD (you only need to do that once, not for every backup). If you loose your boot drive for some reason, you simply replace it, plug in the backup you made, boot from the restore CD, and restore. When the restore is complete you remove the restore CD and backup drive, boot from the restored system, and you're in business.

    I used it to back up a system image from a WD Green drive and restore it to an Intel SSD for testing purposes. It worked without a hitch.

    The thing I like about using the Win7 utility is that it's guaranteed to be compatible. If Win7 SP1 comes out and there's some subtle change to the file system, you don't have to worry about whether it will still work or not.
  8. So hypothetically speaking,

    Let's say my PC is crippled to a point where I can only go as far as the boot menu.

    I insert the external harddrive with the restored image, it will boot up from that and overwrite the half dead primary drive C? Then I restart and I can access my files again like the day when I made the backup?

    What if I save the image file to a internal harddrive? Let's say Driver D, a driver that's not primary. How do I access that from the boot menu?
  9. Amaranthen said:
    half dead primary drive C
    You'll need to figure out what the problem is with your 'half dead' hard disk first of course.
    Best case is that your System Repair Disk - Startup Repair option will work without needing an image restore.
    Or that if you get Win7 to boot but have a problem then the System Repair Disk - System Restore option will work for you.

    At that point, if you're unlucky enough not to be up and running then an image restore is your next step.

    You will not usually 'boot up' from the drive where the image is stored - it might, or might not be a bootable drive.
    You boot with the System Repair Disk and then attach the external harddrive and call for the image from the external drive.

    I use a USB FreeAgent Go external 2.5" drive for my image and backup files.
  10. So my understanding is that, I create a image that is on my External harddrive book.

    In case of serious doo doo in my PC where I m locked out of my windows at the boot menu, i insert the Win 7 install disk. Plug in my EXTRL Hard drive and run from there?

    Sorry for the incessant doubts and questions, I use to be a old fan of Symantec Ghost until Norton ruined it.
  11. Unless you want to start a clean install of Win 7 you won't be using that install disk.

    You will boot with the system restore disk. You will try to do a Startup Repair first.

    See if this video answers your questions. Windows 7 imaging tool - recover an image
  12. Amaranthen said:
    In case of serious doo doo in my PC where I m locked out of my windows at the boot menu, i insert the Win 7 install disk. Plug in my EXTRL Hard drive and run from there?


    Almost. You use the restore CD, not the install CD. When you make your first image backup with the Windows 7 backup utility, it will ask you if you want to make a restore disk. Say yes, insert a blank CD into your CD/DVD writer, and it will burn the restore disk for you. (If you're smart, you'll make more than one copy of it just to be safe).

    From that point on, if your OS disk dies for whatever reason, you just have to:

    a) install a bare replacement disk if necessary (you need a working drive, obviously)
    b) attach the external hard drive with your backup
    c) insert the restore CD that you created
    d) set the BIOS to boot from the CD drive if necessary
    e) boot from the restore CD.

    From that point you'll be able to restore your image backup. When it's done, you can remove the external drive, take the restore CD out of the DVD drive, and boot your restored system. You system will then be back to the point it was at when you made the backup.
  13. Thanks for your input.

    Any known flaws or bugs with this method? It's microsoft afterall, the company that bought us VISTA! LOL
  14. No piece of software is perfect. I haven't had any problems with it, but I recommend you test before you rely on it.

    Testing serves two purposes - it lets you know that the software works as expected, and it also gives you the opportunity to make notes on the procedure you'll need to follow if you ever do have to restore.

    When your system is dead you'll probably be pretty anxious and prone to making mistakes - so it's good to have a tried and true series of steps to follow instead of making it up as you go along.
  15. Hi There,

    New to this forum, new to Win 7, new to the Win 7 Backup Utility!

    The backup seems to work for you; but I tried it on a new machine, and I get a "Not enough space on drive" even though I'm using an 80 G external drive and the software says the image will be ~60 G. I've Googled around, and it seems many others are seeing the same thing. Do youknow anything about this? What size is your source drive, and what size is your backup dive? And one more question if you know: Can I use an IDE drive as the backup if the hard drive is SATA?

    Thank you!

    -----------------------------------

    sminlal said:
    No piece of software is perfect. I haven't had any problems with it, but I recommend you test before you rely on it.

    Testing serves two purposes - it lets you know that the software works as expected, and it also gives you the opportunity to make notes on the procedure you'll need to follow if you ever do have to restore.

    When your system is dead you'll probably be pretty anxious and prone to making mistakes - so it's good to have a tried and true series of steps to follow instead of making it up as you go along.
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