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RIP Johnny Carson

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Anonymous
January 24, 2005 12:37:59 AM

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Woof. Big loss... late night TV has not been the same since 1992. Major loss
for all.




searching for peace, love and quality footwear
guido

http://www.guidotoons.com
http://www.theloniousmoog.com
http://www.luckymanclark.com

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Anonymous
January 24, 2005 12:44:28 PM

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JWelsh3374 wrote:
> Woof. Big loss... late night TV has not been the same since 1992. Major loss
> for all.


Yes, this loss is as big as they come. Johnny was really something, a
huge talent that will never be matched, as well as a wonderful human being.

May he rest in peace.
January 24, 2005 6:24:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

jwelsh3374@aol.comnojunk (JWelsh3374) writes:
>Woof. Big loss... late night TV has not been the same since 1992. Major loss
>for all.

Wasn't he a drummer? I kind of recall him playing on a guest spot on
The Jack Benny show maybe. And of course Steve Allen was a pianist
and composer. Wonder if Paar played anything.
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Anonymous
January 24, 2005 7:28:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>I like Jay, but Johnny cannot be beat, neither in life nor in death. RIP
>Johnny. You will sorely be missed.

Jay has a edge of meanness to his humor that Johnny avoided.

Frank /~ http://newmex.com/f10
@/
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 8:52:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"georgeh" <georgeh@gjhsun.cl.msu.edu> wrote in message
news:ct33vp$sro$2@msunews.cl.msu.edu...
> jwelsh3374@aol.comnojunk (JWelsh3374) writes:
> >Woof. Big loss... late night TV has not been the same since 1992. Major
loss
> >for all.
>
> Wasn't he a drummer? I kind of recall him playing on a guest spot on
> The Jack Benny show maybe. And of course Steve Allen was a pianist
> and composer. Wonder if Paar played anything.

I think he played the piano, but almost never in public.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 9:20:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:uBaJd.20652$8u5.9569@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>
>
> I think he played the piano, but almost never in public.
>

He was a decent drummer the time I saw him when he traded licks with Buddy
Guy on the Tonight Show one night.
January 24, 2005 9:20:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Buddy Rich ..............




"Ricky W. Hunt" <rhunt22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:x%aJd.26865$OF5.621@attbi_s52...
> "Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
> news:uBaJd.20652$8u5.9569@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>>
>>
>> I think he played the piano, but almost never in public.
>>
>
> He was a decent drummer the time I saw him when he traded licks with Buddy
> Guy on the Tonight Show one night.
>
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 9:21:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Frank Vuotto wrote:

> Jay has a edge of meanness to his humor that Johnny avoided.

I think most comedians rely on this edge. That Carson was funny without
it may have been key to his success.
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 9:21:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Buddy Guy is a guitar player. You're thinking of that night when he had
Buddy Rich on.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Ricky W. Hunt" <rhunt22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:x%aJd.26865$OF5.621@attbi_s52...
> "Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
> news:uBaJd.20652$8u5.9569@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> >
> >
> > I think he played the piano, but almost never in public.
> >
>
> He was a decent drummer the time I saw him when he traded licks with Buddy
> Guy on the Tonight Show one night.
>
>
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 9:35:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Joe, Good to see that you're up and about again.
Karl
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 5:11:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Frank Vuotto wrote:
> Jay has a edge of meanness to his humor that Johnny avoided.

Welcome to the brave new world of comedy over the last 10 or
20 years (or maybe a bit longer).

People used to try to keep it clean and friendly. Now they don't
care. I asked a friend who's into comedy a bit about this, and
he basically said the thinking is that if it's funny, it's funny,
and it doesn't matter if it's clean or not. That is, the goal is
to be funny, and lots of people think it's unreasonable to limit
yourself by ruling out certain kinds of jokes.

My own feeling is that anyone who's truly good at comedy can handle
the challenge of working with limitations. In fact, limitations
can be a boon to creativity; for example, think of all the classical
composers that had to write within a certain form and still wrote
great music. Or consider the novel _Gadsby_, which was written
without once using the letter "e" (the most commonly occurring
letter in the alphabet). Or just think of all the comics (like
Johnny Carson) that have managed to be funny without going there.

My other theory on this is that people laugh when they think something
is funny, but they also laugh when they're a little bit uncomfortable.
So, if they can't get a laugh by being funny, some people will try to
get a laugh in any way they can. At least it means the audience
responded.

As a result, you get things like Comedy Central. 4% funny and 96%
"edgy" (read: "crude") because they actually believe they're some
sort of counter-cultural force whose irreverent attitude resonates
with people. Maybe there are people out there who are entertained
by it, but to me there's only so much mileage you can get out of
"oh my god, I can't believe he actually had the guts to say that"
before it starts to get boring. Sooner or later it becomes
necessary to say things that are actually creative and funny.

Hmm, I wonder if that could've been even more off-topic? :-)

- Logan
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 5:11:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <KVhJd.50906$_56.3155@fe2.texas.rr.com>,
Logan Shaw <lshaw-usenet@austin.rr.com> wrote:

> Or consider the novel _Gadsby_, which was written
> without once using the letter "e" (the most commonly occurring
> letter in the alphabet).

Just to take this totally off-topic, I have to say I'm not familiar with
_Gadsby_, but I am familiar with Georges Perec's _A Void_ (_La
disparition_), which was written in French without the letter e. The
'90s translation was *also* written without the letter e, which seems
like something of an achievement. (Admittedly, there were a few
tortured elisions.)

So who wrote _Gadsby_? (Assuming you're not thinking of Fitzgerald's
_The Great Gatsby_, of course.)

--
Maurice Rickard
http://mauricerickard.com/ | http://onezeromusic.com/
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 6:53:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"cooper" <tonycooper88@cox.net> wrote in message
news:sWcJd.22977$EG1.5712@lakeread04...
> Buddy Rich ..............

Oops. Typo.
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 6:54:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
news:_b6dnVVp5MadH2jcRVn-hw@rcn.net...
> Buddy Guy is a guitar player. You're thinking of that night when he had
> Buddy Rich on.

Yep.
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 8:39:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Maurice Rickard wrote:
> In article <KVhJd.50906$_56.3155@fe2.texas.rr.com>,
> Logan Shaw <lshaw-usenet@austin.rr.com> wrote:

>>Or consider the novel _Gadsby_, which was written
>>without once using the letter "e"

> Just to take this totally off-topic, I have to say I'm not familiar with
> _Gadsby_, but I am familiar with Georges Perec's _A Void_ (_La
> disparition_), which was written in French without the letter e. The
> '90s translation was *also* written without the letter e, which seems
> like something of an achievement.

I've heard of that one too; a literary-minded friend of mine told me
about it when the translation came out. (I don't think he read it,
although he did read _Ulysses_, for which I respect him but do not
envy him...)

> So who wrote _Gadsby_? (Assuming you're not thinking of Fitzgerald's
> _The Great Gatsby_, of course.)

Some guy named Ernest V. Wright. Here's the amazon page for it:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/089968445...

I haven't read either, by the way. (The book I'm not reading is
an English translation. Spot *that* reference and win a prize.)

- Logan
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 2:53:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <vYkJd.62087$Ta2.19812@fe2.texas.rr.com>,
Logan Shaw <lshaw-usenet@austin.rr.com> wrote:

> Maurice Rickard wrote:
> > Georges Perec's _A Void_ (_La
> > disparition_), which was written in French without the letter e.
>
> I've heard of that one too; a literary-minded friend of mine told me
> about it when the translation came out. (I don't think he read it,
> although he did read _Ulysses_, for which I respect him but do not
> envy him...)

Actually, Perec's quite readable, and there's more to the books than
just the "hook" of the constraint. To follow up _La disparition_, he
wrote _Les revenentes_, which uses no vowels except for e. His most
impressive book, however, is the astonishingly constructed _La Vie mode
d'emploi_ (_Life, a User's Manual_ in the English translation). Many
intersecting stories in the life history of an apartment building, all
carefully fitting together in a mysteriously ordered structure.

> > So who wrote _Gadsby_?
>
> Some guy named Ernest V. Wright. Here's the amazon page for it:
>
> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/089968445...
>
> I haven't read either, by the way. (The book I'm not reading is
> an English translation. Spot *that* reference and win a prize.)

Ah, Patty Larkin! Not my usual genre, so I'm not terribly familiar, but
what I've heard over the years has stood out for its wit. (Hold the
prize, though--I used Google.)

--
Maurice Rickard
http://mauricerickard.com/ | http://onezeromusic.com/
January 25, 2005 9:04:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Great Comedian, entertainer.

One thing that set Johnny apart was when his material bombed he was
more funny than when it worked. I don't think I have seen anyone else
who had that kind of ability.

You knew you were going to be entertained either way.

He was a cool guy. ANYONE WHO SMOKES OUT THERE TAKE HEED!
He could have easily lived another ten or 15 years if he were not a
long time smoker.
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 10:29:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Maurice Rickard wrote:
>>Some guy named Ernest V. Wright. Here's the amazon page for it:

>>I haven't read either, by the way. (The book I'm not reading is
>>an English translation. Spot *that* reference and win a prize.)

> Ah, Patty Larkin! Not my usual genre, so I'm not terribly familiar, but
> what I've heard over the years has stood out for its wit. (Hold the
> prize, though--I used Google.)

That's OK, I will award it to you anyway. That you got it with aid from
an automatic contraption such as that is not bad, although I thought
that with a hint from such a contraption you still would find it far
from trivial. (Words such as "book", "I'm", and "not" occurring so
commonly, I thought you would find way too many hits, but if I try it,
it's obvious that a hit is found quickly.)

I must admit that it is difficult writing this way. If you did not
catch on so far, what you win is a posting built without using that
symbol. I'm writing of that symbol which is most common among all
symbols. It is found following "qw", and "rty" follows it, as any
good touch typist will know.

Wow, good thing I can sign my post without using that symbol. I
cannot fathom that an author could, um, author a book this way.

- Logan
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 10:29:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Logan Shaw wrote:

> Wow, good thing I can sign my post without using that symbol. I
> cannot fathom that an author could, um, author a book this way.

Puts me in mind of the usenet poster who was rather prolific
and wrote in perfectly left/right justified ascii text
without any extra spaces and without it seeming the least
bit contrived. I can't remember where it was that he mostly
posted but it was rather astonishing. Haven't seen anything
from him in quite a few years and can't remember his handle.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 3:34:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 18:21:52 -0500, "Roger W. Norman"
<rnorman@starpower.net> wrote:

>Buddy Guy is a guitar player. You're thinking of that night when he had
>Buddy Rich on.

ISTR he had Buddy Rich on several times (performing AND chatting
each time), but I don't remember one when Johnny played drums. I must
have missed that one.
I recall when Buddy was on the Tonight Show telling a story, he was
giving drumming lessons to some then-minor-league actor (I forget the
name) who ended up starring in some really popular movie, and he
called Buddy to tell him about how his movie was doing great, and it
was really skyrocketing his acting career. Buddy responded "Oh, gee,
I'm sorry to hear that. You would have made a pretty good drummer."
You gotta like priorities like that.

-----
http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 4:02:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 02:11:54 GMT, Logan Shaw
<lshaw-usenet@austin.rr.com> wrote:

>Frank Vuotto wrote:
>> Jay has a edge of meanness to his humor that Johnny avoided.
>
>Welcome to the brave new world of comedy over the last 10 or
>20 years (or maybe a bit longer).

I was going to say it's not just Jay, that Johnny was unique in
avoiding that meanness.

I recall some Richard Pryor HBO (or some cable network) specials
where he was a real potty mouth, that was around 1980. He wasn't
really mean, just dirty as hell. For not-just-dirty-but-really-
mean-spirited, there was Lenny Bruce in the '60's (I'm too young to
have ever heard him, but I've read some of his writings and head about
him - he was a real inspiration to George "The Seven Dirty Words"
Carlin).
But Johnny was none of that. I vaguely recall that he'd tell the
occasional risque or 'dirty joke' and say the expected things about
the President and such, but Johnny was definitely not mean-spirited.

>People used to try to keep it clean and friendly. Now they don't
>care. I asked a friend who's into comedy a bit about this, and
>he basically said the thinking is that if it's funny, it's funny,
>and it doesn't matter if it's clean or not. That is, the goal is
>to be funny, and lots of people think it's unreasonable to limit
>yourself by ruling out certain kinds of jokes.
>
>My own feeling is that anyone who's truly good at comedy can handle
>the challenge of working with limitations. In fact, limitations
>can be a boon to creativity; for example, think of all the classical
>composers that had to write within a certain form and still wrote
>great music. Or consider the novel _Gadsby_, which was written
>without once using the letter "e" (the most commonly occurring
>letter in the alphabet). Or just think of all the comics (like
>Johnny Carson) that have managed to be funny without going there.

Again, it wasn't that Carson wasn't dirty, it's that he wasn't
hurtful. I noticed that when I watched him years ago, I thought gee,
this is a nice, caring man. He always wanted to bring out the best in
people.
The local news said he was the king of self-deprecating humor. He
did end up as the butt of many jokes, such as Ed joking that all of
Johnny's huge salary went to support his ex-wives and such.

> ...

>Hmm, I wonder if that could've been even more off-topic? :-)

At least audio production was (it still is, I understand) part of
The Tonight Show. Maybe if you had repeated some political jokes... :) 

> - Logan

-----
http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 7:22:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 25 Jan 2005 18:04:02 -0800, "db" <deanbowlus@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

>Great Comedian, entertainer.
>
>One thing that set Johnny apart was when his material bombed he was
>more funny than when it worked. I don't think I have seen anyone else
>who had that kind of ability.
>
>You knew you were going to be entertained either way.
>
>He was a cool guy. ANYONE WHO SMOKES OUT THERE TAKE HEED!
>He could have easily lived another ten or 15 years if he were not a
>long time smoker.

I recall that in the '70's he smoked on the air. I know he had quit
smoking at one time, someone on the show had congratulated him for
quitting. So had he started back? I don't think he ever smoked on the
show during his last years on it.

I haven't smoked a cigarette (nor anything else) since 1992 (just
coincidence this was Johnny's last year on TV). Quitting was one of
the best things I did for myself.

-----
http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 12:44:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bob Cain <arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote:
>Logan Shaw wrote:
>
>> Wow, good thing I can sign my post without using that symbol. I
>> cannot fathom that an author could, um, author a book this way.
>
>Puts me in mind of the usenet poster who was rather prolific
>and wrote in perfectly left/right justified ascii text
>without any extra spaces and without it seeming the least
>bit contrived. I can't remember where it was that he mostly
>posted but it was rather astonishing. Haven't seen anything
>from him in quite a few years and can't remember his handle.

For a long time, this was one of the standard gimmicks in talk.bizarre
and a number of people did it. A google search for "how nicely this
paragraph is justified" might find references.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 2:02:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

He played the Drums!
Tom

"Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:uBaJd.20652$8u5.9569@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>
> "georgeh" <georgeh@gjhsun.cl.msu.edu> wrote in message
> news:ct33vp$sro$2@msunews.cl.msu.edu...
> > jwelsh3374@aol.comnojunk (JWelsh3374) writes:
> > >Woof. Big loss... late night TV has not been the same since 1992. Major
> loss
> > >for all.
> >
> > Wasn't he a drummer? I kind of recall him playing on a guest spot on
> > The Jack Benny show maybe. And of course Steve Allen was a pianist
> > and composer. Wonder if Paar played anything.
>
> I think he played the piano, but almost never in public.
>
> Peace,
> Paul
>
>
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 2:02:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

You mean Buddy Rich!
Tom


"Ricky W. Hunt" <rhunt22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:x%aJd.26865$OF5.621@attbi_s52...
> "Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
> news:uBaJd.20652$8u5.9569@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> >
> >
> > I think he played the piano, but almost never in public.
> >
>
> He was a decent drummer the time I saw him when he traded licks with Buddy
> Guy on the Tonight Show one night.
>
>
January 26, 2005 6:23:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Ben Bradley <ben_nospam_bradley@frontiernet.net> writes:
> The local news said he was the king of self-deprecating humor. He
>did end up as the butt of many jokes, such as Ed joking that all of
>Johnny's huge salary went to support his ex-wives and such.

No, the king of Self-deprecating humor HAD to be Jack Benny.
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 6:23:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

georgeh wrote:

> Ben Bradley <ben_nospam_bradley@frontiernet.net> writes:
>
>> The local news said he was the king of self-deprecating humor. He
>>did end up as the butt of many jokes, such as Ed joking that all of
>>Johnny's huge salary went to support his ex-wives and such.
>
>
> No, the king of Self-deprecating humor HAD to be Jack Benny.

What about Rodney Dangerfield?
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 7:30:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Joe Sensor" <crabcakes@emagic.net> wrote in message
news:35prcjF4nr93oU1@individual.net...
> georgeh wrote:
>
>> Ben Bradley <ben_nospam_bradley@frontiernet.net> writes:
>>
>>> The local news said he was the king of self-deprecating humor. He
>>>did end up as the butt of many jokes, such as Ed joking that all of
>>>Johnny's huge salary went to support his ex-wives and such.
>>
>>
>> No, the king of Self-deprecating humor HAD to be Jack Benny.
>
> What about Rodney Dangerfield?

Definitely over Jack Benny.
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 7:30:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <OAPJd.29779$IV5.14347@attbi_s54>,
"Ricky W. Hunt" <rhunt22@hotmail.com> wrote:

> "Joe Sensor" <crabcakes@emagic.net> wrote in message
> news:35prcjF4nr93oU1@individual.net...
> > georgeh wrote:
> >
> >> Ben Bradley <ben_nospam_bradley@frontiernet.net> writes:
> >>
> >>> The local news said he was the king of self-deprecating humor. He
> >>>did end up as the butt of many jokes, such as Ed joking that all of
> >>>Johnny's huge salary went to support his ex-wives and such.
> >>
> >>
> >> No, the king of Self-deprecating humor HAD to be Jack Benny.
> >
> > What about Rodney Dangerfield?
>
> Definitely over Jack Benny.

Benny was a master of understatement while Dangerfield was just the opposite.
Both did use self-deprecating humor well.

Anyone know why so little of Jack Benny's work is available on DVD? There are
some DVDs of the TV show, but I haven't found the one with Johnny Carson, which
I think is my favorite of them all.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 9:14:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Tommy B" <mrtomm@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4NKJd.6265$r27.814@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> He played the Drums!
> Tom
>
> "Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
> news:uBaJd.20652$8u5.9569@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> >
> > "georgeh" <georgeh@gjhsun.cl.msu.edu> wrote in message
> > news:ct33vp$sro$2@msunews.cl.msu.edu...
> > > jwelsh3374@aol.comnojunk (JWelsh3374) writes:
> > > >Woof. Big loss... late night TV has not been the same since 1992.
Major
> > loss
> > > >for all.
> > >
> > > Wasn't he a drummer? I kind of recall him playing on a guest spot on
> > > The Jack Benny show maybe. And of course Steve Allen was a pianist
> > > and composer. Wonder if Paar played anything.
> >
> > I think he played the piano, but almost never in public.

When I said "he played the piano", I was referring to Paar.

Peace,
Paul
January 26, 2005 9:44:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jay Kadis <jay@ccrma.stanford.edu> writes:

>> >>> The local news said he was the king of self-deprecating humor. He
>> >>>did end up as the butt of many jokes, such as Ed joking that all of
>> >>>Johnny's huge salary went to support his ex-wives and such.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> No, the king of Self-deprecating humor HAD to be Jack Benny.
>> >
>> > What about Rodney Dangerfield?
>>
>> Definitely over Jack Benny.

>Benny was a master of understatement while Dangerfield was just the opposite.
>Both did use self-deprecating humor well.

>Anyone know why so little of Jack Benny's work is available on DVD? There are
>some DVDs of the TV show, but I haven't found the one with Johnny Carson, which
>I think is my favorite of them all.

That was a good one, though the one with The Smothers Brothers was right
up there too! Back in the early 80s, Detroit Public TV began airing the
Benny Show which hadn't been seen locally since it left CBS(?).

I figured it would be dated, with much of its humor recycled old
radio gags. Boy was I wrong. It was hilarious, and the crew adapted
to TV very well with many visual gags to go along with the classic
radio bits.
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 9:44:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <ct8oeo$30qc$1@msunews.cl.msu.edu>,
georgeh <georgeh@gjhsun.cl.msu.edu> wrote:

> Jay Kadis <jay@ccrma.stanford.edu> writes:
>
> >> >>> The local news said he was the king of self-deprecating humor. He
> >> >>>did end up as the butt of many jokes, such as Ed joking that all of
> >> >>>Johnny's huge salary went to support his ex-wives and such.
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> No, the king of Self-deprecating humor HAD to be Jack Benny.
> >> >
> >> > What about Rodney Dangerfield?
> >>
> >> Definitely over Jack Benny.
>
> >Benny was a master of understatement while Dangerfield was just the
> >opposite.
> >Both did use self-deprecating humor well.
>
> >Anyone know why so little of Jack Benny's work is available on DVD? There
> >are
> >some DVDs of the TV show, but I haven't found the one with Johnny Carson,
> >which
> >I think is my favorite of them all.
>
> That was a good one, though the one with The Smothers Brothers was right
> up there too! Back in the early 80s, Detroit Public TV began airing the
> Benny Show which hadn't been seen locally since it left CBS(?).
>
> I figured it would be dated, with much of its humor recycled old
> radio gags. Boy was I wrong. It was hilarious, and the crew adapted
> to TV very well with many visual gags to go along with the classic
> radio bits.


What struck me most was the Lucky cigarette ads completely integrated with the
show. I almost stopped and bought a pack. Then I remembered why I quit so long
ago...

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 10:21:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Interesting posting from one of the Tonight Show mixers
(Ron Estes) over on news:rec.arts.movies.production.sound
!