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Mixing for Television

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Anonymous
January 26, 2005 10:42:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I recently started doing a little audio mixing for television and am
really winging it. Any tips suggestions would be appreciated. I have
the Digi Design AE plugins native to the Avid.

This is my procedure;

I first deal with the dialogue. I apply a normalizing filter at -4.5
db and then tweek where necessary.

I then address the bg sound. I don't treat it too much. I just worry
about levels.

Then I work the music. Depending on the situation I try to allow
sufficient volume without fighting the dialogue. I eq the music in 2
ways; a general dip in the voice range depending on the gender of the
voice and I apply a notch dip at 1,200 hz to avoid listener fatigue,
if memory serves, suggested by Fletcher-Munson.

Is this techique remotely relevant?

What about my overall approach does it make more sense to attack the
mix as a whole?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

JC

More about : mixing television

January 26, 2005 11:24:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Judging from what I've seen of TV audio production, just boost the hell
out of the commercials to the compressor's or limiter's limit.
Sorry to troll so facetiously.
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 12:18:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Quido wrote:
> I recently started doing a little audio mixing for television and am
> really winging it. Any tips suggestions would be appreciated. I have
> the Digi Design AE plugins native to the Avid.
>
> This is my procedure;
>
> I first deal with the dialogue. I apply a normalizing filter at -4.5
> db and then tweek where necessary.
>
> I then address the bg sound. I don't treat it too much. I just worry
> about levels.
>
> Then I work the music. Depending on the situation I try to allow
> sufficient volume without fighting the dialogue. I eq the music in 2
> ways; a general dip in the voice range depending on the gender of the
> voice and I apply a notch dip at 1,200 hz to avoid listener fatigue,
> if memory serves, suggested by Fletcher-Munson.
>
> Is this techique remotely relevant?
>
> What about my overall approach does it make more sense to attack the
> mix as a whole?
>
> Any suggestions would be appreciated.
>
> JC

The TV station I work at has a policy of not eq'ing anything. All they
want is a good mix as far as levels go. The music should be kept under
the voices by the fader, not the eq. EQ'ing is very subjective, so our
station's policy is not to use this variable in the mix. The anchor
voices take priority and should be heard at all times while keeping nat
sound from video and music underneath the anchors for voice overs. Keep
it simple. It's not like mixing a music production or CD.

The other thing is execution. Opening the mics on time, bringing up the
sound for packages, hitting your music carts and taking direction from
the directors. Most producers and directors would rather have a bad mix
than a late mic or silence, not that bad mixes are acceptable. On the
other end of the spectrum, is not to open their mics too soon. The
anchors might be talking about something they don't want the audience
to hear. Catching an anchor off guard this way can get you and the
anchor in trouble. Simplify your approach to make your execution
easier.

Stan
Related resources
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 12:52:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Quido wrote:

>I recently started doing a little audio mixing for television and am
>really winging it. Any tips suggestions would be appreciated. I have
>the Digi Design AE plugins native to the Avid.
>
>This is my procedure;
>
>I first deal with the dialogue. I apply a normalizing filter at -4.5
>db and then tweek where necessary.
>
>I then address the bg sound. I don't treat it too much. I just worry
>about levels.
>
>Then I work the music. Depending on the situation I try to allow
>sufficient volume without fighting the dialogue. I eq the music in 2
>ways; a general dip in the voice range depending on the gender of the
>voice and I apply a notch dip at 1,200 hz to avoid listener fatigue,
>if memory serves, suggested by Fletcher-Munson.
>
>Is this techique remotely relevant?

It seems very formulaic, or, as I like to say, one-size-fits-none. Rather
than apply this normalization and that EQ, it's far more important to listen
to the results and do what your ears tell you.

>What about my overall approach does it make more sense to attack the
>mix as a whole?
>
>Any suggestions would be appreciated.

As with any audio mixing, monitoring is crucial to good results. You won't
like what your ears tell you if your monitors and room are generating sonic
falacies.

--
========================================================================
Michael Kesti | "And like, one and one don't make
| two, one and one make one."
mkesti@gv.net | - The Who, Bargain
January 27, 2005 1:02:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

All I can say is never, ever, underestimate the importance of a mic
check;)

(Then check it one more time)
Before the show that is...

speaking from bad experience...;)

TH
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 1:57:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Quido" <jchristow@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:54495326.0501261942.138abdb@posting.google.com...
> I recently started doing a little audio mixing for television and am
> really winging it. Any tips suggestions would be appreciated. I have
> the Digi Design AE plugins native to the Avid.
>
> This is my procedure;
>
> I first deal with the dialogue. I apply a normalizing filter at -4.5
> db and then tweek where necessary.
>
> I then address the bg sound. I don't treat it too much. I just worry
> about levels.
>
> Then I work the music. Depending on the situation I try to allow
> sufficient volume without fighting the dialogue. I eq the music in 2
> ways; a general dip in the voice range depending on the gender of the
> voice and I apply a notch dip at 1,200 hz to avoid listener fatigue,
> if memory serves, suggested by Fletcher-Munson.
>
> Is this techique remotely relevant?
>
> What about my overall approach does it make more sense to attack the
> mix as a whole?
>
> Any suggestions would be appreciated.
>
> JC
-----------------------------------
Every so often play your mix back at very loud volume on several systems,
this shows the work in a 'naked' form, helps you hear anything
'objectionable'.

Some eq basics:

12K air

8-10 K Upper Mids, Edge

5-7 K Articulation Zone

1.6-4K Hurtin' Zone

500-1.6 Mids

200-450 Lower Mid, Warmth, Mud Zone, only one lives here, commonly cut a lot

200 Moo Zone

100 Pop Zone, Warmth

50 Thud Zone


-bg-


www.lchb.ca
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:48:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 26 Jan 2005 19:42:03 -0800, jchristow@hotmail.com (Quido) wrote:

>I recently started doing a little audio mixing for television and am
>really winging it. Any tips suggestions would be appreciated. I have
>the Digi Design AE plugins native to the Avid.
>
>This is my procedure;
>
>I first deal with the dialogue. I apply a normalizing filter at -4.5
>db and then tweek where necessary.
>
>I then address the bg sound. I don't treat it too much. I just worry
>about levels.
>
>Then I work the music. Depending on the situation I try to allow
>sufficient volume without fighting the dialogue. I eq the music in 2
>ways; a general dip in the voice range depending on the gender of the
>voice and I apply a notch dip at 1,200 hz to avoid listener fatigue,
>if memory serves, suggested by Fletcher-Munson.
>
>Is this techique remotely relevant?
>
>What about my overall approach does it make more sense to attack the
>mix as a whole?

Seems un-necessarily complicated. Why sabotage the music with eq? If
it's to be heard, let it be top quality. If not, turn it down a bit.


CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 7:30:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I should have been a little clearer. I'm doing post audio on life-style
sequences. I have a very limited selection of stock music with some
higher end intruments that occasionally fight with the voice track.
The shows are interview dialogue driven, no voice overs. This is why I
use the normalizing filter. The source material is all over the place.
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 12:52:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Quido wrote:
> I recently started doing a little audio mixing for television and am
> really winging it. Any tips suggestions would be appreciated. I have
> the Digi Design AE plugins native to the Avid.
>
> This is my procedure;
>
> I first deal with the dialogue. I apply a normalizing filter at -4.5
> db and then tweek where necessary.
>
> I then address the bg sound. I don't treat it too much. I just worry
> about levels.
>
> Then I work the music. Depending on the situation I try to allow
> sufficient volume without fighting the dialogue. I eq the music in 2
> ways; a general dip in the voice range depending on the gender of the
> voice and I apply a notch dip at 1,200 hz to avoid listener fatigue,
> if memory serves, suggested by Fletcher-Munson.
>
> Is this techique remotely relevant?
>
> What about my overall approach does it make more sense to attack the
> mix as a whole?
>
> Any suggestions would be appreciated.
>
> JC

JC,
your methods are interesting and if they are working for you, that is
fine. The most important thing is the clarity of the dialog. Next is
smoothness of the levels. Most television channels have a maximum peak
level of -10dBFS (10dB lower than the absolute maximum digital audio
level). You will need a good pair of digital audio meters for
this.(Sony or Tascam DAT machines are great for metering.) How are you
monitoring your levels visually? Good mixing practice is to mix for 0
VU on a pair of quality VU meters (not LED meters) Coleman meters are
very good, Dorroughs are even better. What kind of speakers are you
mixing on? What kind of Avid are you using? Are you flowing your audio
through a mixer (01v maybe)? What Digi plug-ins do you have?
A major consideration in mixing consistently is speaker monitoring
levels. In the surround section of the Digidesign User Conference (
under the Support tab at http://www.digidesign.com/) there is a very
comprehensive discussion on aligning your audio monitors. Proper setup
of your speakers and working at the same standard levels really makes
it easier to create consistent mixes.

Feel free to write me for details at: nospamdennism1@optonline.net
I hope this helps.

P. Dennis Mitchell
Post Mixer
SoundImageNY
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 1:55:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"WillStG" <> wrote in message But being pretty busy with breaking news,
> checking in remotes and a lot of on the fly programming changes, I do
> like having things set up to where I can just track a fader to zero or
> to -20 or -7 and have the levels stay pretty consistent without having

Nothing like real world experienced people to get the record straight. Great
Post.

Nathan
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 5:19:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Nathan West" <natewest@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:RpzKd.63021$fE4.8106610@twister.southeast.rr.com...
>
> "WillStG" <> wrote in message But being pretty busy with breaking news,
>> checking in remotes and a lot of on the fly programming changes, I do
>> like having things set up to where I can just track a fader to zero or
>> to -20 or -7 and have the levels stay pretty consistent without having
>
> Nothing like real world experienced people to get the record straight.
> Great
> Post.

Love 'em or hate 'em for their political positions, FNC has great &
consistent sound at almost any time of day you tune in. Here's a "Good on
ya" for Will & his cohorts, I say.

Neil Henderson
!