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Other software on your DAW

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January 27, 2005 6:52:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also know
that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone DAW and
separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.



I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
applications installed on your DAW that:



1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
computer

2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW



Examples that I'm curious about:



- Office 2003

- Anti virus software

- QuickBooks

- Crystal Reports

- Adobe Acrobat Reader

- Flight SIM <grin>

- MSN Messenger



Thanks,


Gavin

More about : software daw

Anonymous
January 27, 2005 6:52:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Gavin wrote:
> I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also know
> that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone DAW and
> separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.
>
>
>
> I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
> applications installed on your DAW that:
>
>
>
> 1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
> computer
>
> 2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW
>
>
>
> Examples that I'm curious about:
>
>
>
> - Office 2003

Office 2004, no effect.


> - Anti virus software

Rarely use it, but I run it when I'm not here. It may overload the CPU
if I ran it while I was recording or playing back a lot of tracks.


> - Adobe Acrobat Reader

No effect.


Netscape - no effect. In fact, it's (ie, this) a good diversion while
bouncing or other lengthy operations.

If applications are only installed, not running, there's never an
effect. If they are running, and DP complains the CPU was overloaded,
then I stop them and let DP finish. Rarely happens. I don't do this
while recording, not wishing to tempt fate.

I even can record a main mix using a second application while recording
multiple tracks on DP4. I don't do that often, but it gets a rough mix
recorded fast!

Admittedly, this is not critical for me because my clients record to
tape. The DAW is secondary here.
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 6:53:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Gavin" <gavin@interNOpromSPAM.com> wrote in message
news:Za6dncSVD9YgyWTcRVn-oA@look.ca...
>I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also know
>that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone DAW and
>separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.

Since you're writing from a Windows-based computer and referring to
Windows-based software, you might find this web site useful to you:

http://www.musicxp.net

John LeBlanc
Houston, TX
Related resources
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 7:47:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The main thing I like to keep off of my DAW is a connection to the
internet, tying avoid viruses and other problems. If you must connect
to the net I would avoid to Microsoft products like Internet Explorer
a Outlook, which seem to always have security problems. You can use a
replacement such as Firefox & Mozilla.

Al

On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 15:52:55 -0500, "Gavin"
<gavin@interNOpromSPAM.com> wrote:

>I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also know
>that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone DAW and
>separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.
>
>
>
>I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
>applications installed on your DAW that:
>
>
>
>1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
>computer
>
>2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW
>
>
>
>Examples that I'm curious about:
>
>
>
>- Office 2003
>
>- Anti virus software
>
>- QuickBooks
>
>- Crystal Reports
>
>- Adobe Acrobat Reader
>
>- Flight SIM <grin>
>
>- MSN Messenger
>
>
>
>Thanks,
>
>
>Gavin
>
>
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 4:34:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Gavin" <gavin@interNOpromSPAM.com> wrote in message
news:Za6dncSVD9YgyWTcRVn-oA@look.ca...
> I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also
know
> that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone DAW
and
> separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.
>
>
>
> I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
> applications installed on your DAW that:
>
>
>
> 1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
> computer
>
> 2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW
>
>
>
> Examples that I'm curious about:
>
>
>
> - Office 2003
>
> - Anti virus software
>
> - QuickBooks
>
> - Crystal Reports
>
> - Adobe Acrobat Reader
>
> - Flight SIM <grin>
>
> - MSN Messenger
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Gavin

Office 2003 will likely have an applet called FastFind. This runs in the
background and will eventually bit you. You need to disable this or
uninstall it if possible.
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 4:36:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'd be careful about anything that hits the net or receives info from the
net. I've had DVD playback get jerky while email downloads in the
background; if that can happen, it can conceivably skew the timing during
recording. I'm not worried about playback.

If the recording or mixing is important, why not disconnect from the net and
stop any unneeded services anyway? Just to be safe.


"Gavin" <gavin@interNOpromSPAM.com> wrote in message
news:Za6dncSVD9YgyWTcRVn-oA@look.ca...
>I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also
>know that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone
>DAW and separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.
>
>
>
> I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
> applications installed on your DAW that:
>
>
>
> 1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
> computer
>
> 2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW
>
>
>
> Examples that I'm curious about:
>
>
>
> - Office 2003
>
> - Anti virus software
>
> - QuickBooks
>
> - Crystal Reports
>
> - Adobe Acrobat Reader
>
> - Flight SIM <grin>
>
> - MSN Messenger
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Gavin
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 10:47:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <Za6dncSVD9YgyWTcRVn-oA@look.ca> gavin@interNOpromSPAM.com writes:

> I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
> applications installed on your DAW that:
>
> 1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
> computer
>
> 2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW

> Examples that I'm curious about:
> - Office 2003

I have Word and Excel installed on my computer, but I think they're
from Office 97. No problems.

> - Anti virus software

If it doesn't run continually, but only runs when you tell it to, it
should be no problem.

> - QuickBooks
> - Crystal Reports
> - Adobe Acrobat Reader

I'm not sure what Crystal Reports is (a stripper, perhaps?) but
basically anything that doesn't try to access the Internet or access
the disk drive until you tell it to should be OK.

> - Flight SIM <grin>
> - MSN Messenger

Again, it doesn't matter if the software is just sitting there not
doing anything when you're doing audio. Since Flight Simulator does
have some sound effects, this might be a problem in that it might
change some of your audio settings, but that's something you can fix.
MSN Messenger implies that the computer might have an active Internet
connection, and that could be dangerous because stuff happens that
you're not aware of that could take up some resources when your audio
program needs them.

The big risk, though, with an Internet-connected computer for audio
(or for that matter, any business-critical application) is that
there's the constant temptation to download stuff and install it. It's
too easy not to be careful enough and even legitimate programs can
change settings and not tell you (but they should).


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 12:57:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I have never run across "Crystal Reports"... but off hand I'd say
that the only item in your list which might be innocuous would
be Acrobat Reader. Everything else (except Flight Sim?) has
running background processes as well as an insatiable desire
to connect to the internet.

--
David Morgan (MAMS)
http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com
Morgan Audio Media Service
Dallas, Texas (214) 662-9901
_______________________________________
http://www.artisan-recordingstudio.com






"Gavin" <gavin@interNOpromSPAM.com> wrote in message news:Za6dncSVD9YgyWTcRVn-oA@look.ca...
> I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also know
> that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone DAW and
> separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.
>
>
>
> I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
> applications installed on your DAW that:
>
>
>
> 1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
> computer
>
> 2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW
>
>
>
> Examples that I'm curious about:
>
>
>
> - Office 2003
>
> - Anti virus software
>
> - QuickBooks
>
> - Crystal Reports
>
> - Adobe Acrobat Reader
>
> - Flight SIM <grin>
>
> - MSN Messenger
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Gavin
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 1:05:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <N%nKd.1174$ck5.951@trnddc05> mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com writes:

> that the only item in your list which might be innocuous would
> be Acrobat Reader. Everything else (except Flight Sim?) has
> running background processes as well as an insatiable desire
> to connect to the internet.

Every so often (it might even be on a regular schedule) Acrobat asks
me if I want to update something, and not just something required to
make the file readable. Over the Internet of course. But at least it
only wants to surf when I'm consciously running the program, not when
I'm not expecting it. It's programs that do things on their own even
when you don't realize they're running that might be detrenental to
somooth DAW operation.

The disk drive on my Windows computers is always chattering along even
when the computers are just sitting there unused, and not connected to
the Internet. Maybe it has something to do with the twenty-some
"processes" running even though I have practically nothing in Startup
and don't have any programs open other than the one that tells me
what's running.

I guess it's fruitless to worry about these things since I don't seem
to be having any problems. On the other hand, I don't use my computers
for live multitrack recording, so maybe I have problems I don't know
about.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 1:27:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
>
> I have Word and Excel installed on my computer, but I think they're
> from Office 97. No problems.

I stopped upgrading at Office 97--haven't found anything useful enough to justify the increased disk space and interconnectedness of the newer versions.



>>- Crystal Reports
>
> I'm not sure what Crystal Reports is (a stripper, perhaps?)

A report generator originally designed for for dBase.
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 4:00:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

As long as software is not running in the background, there is really no
potential for interfering with your audio app. Just disconnect from the
internet if you are worried about having the most stable DAW possible,
but you can leave the applications installed.

As far as anti-virus software goes, that's the most problematic because
it usually scans disks regularly to check for viruses. You'll have to
disable the auto-scan feature and just manually run the virus check
every so often. Or turn auto-scan off/on depending on whether you are
using the audio application. I run audio on a Mac, so I don't really
worry about viruses. I would also suggest making images of your boot
drive on a regular basis in case something does go wacky, though.

Cheers,
Trevor de Clercq


Gavin wrote:
> I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also know
> that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone DAW and
> separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.
>
>
>
> I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
> applications installed on your DAW that:
>
>
>
> 1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
> computer
>
> 2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW
>
>
>
> Examples that I'm curious about:
>
>
>
> - Office 2003
>
> - Anti virus software
>
> - QuickBooks
>
> - Crystal Reports
>
> - Adobe Acrobat Reader
>
> - Flight SIM <grin>
>
> - MSN Messenger
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Gavin
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 4:24:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"DScott" <> wrote in message
> > I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
> > applications installed on your DAW that:

Run a Dual Boot system with the DAW on one boot, and the Office and Misc
Software on the other. XP Pro will create the boot automatically if you
install it a second time.

Leave the DAW boot stripped of anything but Music Software. Also go to
www.blackviper.com and check out his list of services you can disable. Very
handy, and it also helps the DAW run better.


Nathan
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 7:51:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1106918169k@trad...
> Every so often (it might even be on a regular schedule) Acrobat asks
> me if I want to update something, and not just something required to
> make the file readable.

Adobe products are second only to QuickTime in there sneaky phone home ways.
I highly recomend installing Zone Alarm ( free for the consumer level).
You'll then get to see how often many applications try to contact the
mothership.

> The disk drive on my Windows computers is always chattering along even
> when the computers are just sitting there unused, and not connected to
> the Internet.

Even if you don't experience a problem, the harddrives maybe doing a search
or the Virtual Memory part of windows maybe talking to things to find out
what's going on. I still recommend ZoneAlarm (if you don't already have it).
I think it's value is in telling you what is trying to get out, not in what
is trying to break in.

Nathan
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 7:51:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <b4uKd.62164$fE4.8044136@twister.southeast.rr.com> natewest@nc.rr.com writes:

> Adobe products are second only to QuickTime in there sneaky phone home ways.
> I highly recomend installing Zone Alarm ( free for the consumer level).
> You'll then get to see how often many applications try to contact the
> mothership.

I have it installed, and unless I'm conscioulsy doing an upgrade (or
accessing a file that's on the Internet, when something asks to access
the Internet, I tell it no and it does what I want anyway. Real Audio
is famous for this.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 7:51:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> In article <b4uKd.62164$fE4.8044136@twister.southeast.rr.com>
> natewest@nc.rr.com writes:
>
>> Adobe products are second only to QuickTime in there sneaky phone
>> home ways. I highly recomend installing Zone Alarm ( free for the
>> consumer level). You'll then get to see how often many applications
>> try to contact the mothership.
>
> I have it installed, and unless I'm conscioulsy doing an upgrade (or
> accessing a file that's on the Internet, when something asks to access
> the Internet, I tell it no and it does what I want anyway. Real Audio
> is famous for this.

QuickTime is really annoying for installing itself on the task bar and in
the startup process every time you use it. I don't know how many times I've
deleted it....

jak
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 8:22:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Gavin wrote:

> I know that it's best to have your DAW as DEDICATED as possible. I also
know
> that in the REAL world - one may not have the luxury of a standalone DAW
and
> separate a standalone EVERYTHING ELSE computer.
>
> I was wondering if anyone can list any specific applications or TYPE of
> applications installed on your DAW that:
>
> 1) You find doesn't interfere at all with the recording application of the
> computer
>
> 2) have DEFINATLY be detrimental to using the computer as a DAW
>
> Examples that I'm curious about:
>
> - Office 2003
> - Anti virus software
> - QuickBooks
> - Crystal Reports
> - Adobe Acrobat Reader
> - Flight SIM <grin>
> - MSN Messenger

I have the converse problem: Acrobat will not run if I have my DAW software
installed.

No problems with QuickBooks, Office, or antivirus software despite automatic
updates running in the background -- but then my DAW processes audio on the
card, not natively. I do keep automatic email notification and "system
sounds" turned off because that's what the manufacturer recommends.

This is on an MTU MicroSound, BTW, which is a rather obscure DAW but has an
interface that's great for broadcast and is incredibly stable. MTU's
concentrating on karaoke authoring now, and the current MicroEditor software
for XPPro will probably be the last upgrade of a great product. I'm running
it on a Dell PII 400MHz with Win98, but it will actually run on even older
platforms just fine.

Interesting thread.

Jeff Jasper
Jeff Jasper Productions, West Funroe, La.
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 3:36:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <h4FKd.83487$Ta2.19417@fe2.texas.rr.com> nospamola@mystudio.com writes:

> This is on an MTU MicroSound, BTW, which is a rather obscure DAW but has an
> interface that's great for broadcast and is incredibly stable. MTU's
> concentrating on karaoke authoring now, and the current MicroEditor software
> for XPPro will probably be the last upgrade of a great product.

I wondered if the company was still around. They were one of the first
in the DAW business before DAW was a household word. One of our local
NPR stations still uses it and they're still happy with it, but they
just do straightforward editing, nothing fancy.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
January 30, 2005 2:54:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote in reply to my post:
> > This is on an MTU MicroSound, BTW, which is a rather obscure DAW but has
an
> > interface that's great for broadcast and is incredibly stable.
>
> I wondered if the company was still around. They were one of the first
> in the DAW business before DAW was a household word. One of our local
> NPR stations still uses it and they're still happy with it, but they
> just do straightforward editing, nothing fancy.

Yes, MTU is still around but nearly 100% out of the hardware manufacturing
business now. MTU MicroEditor used propriety sound file formats that were
based on .wav, but supposedly contained additional features. Later versions
of the software allowed the same manipulations of files in .wav format,
occasionally using an automatic conversion into the proprietary format for
such tasks as EQ and compression. Effects layers were written separately to
additional tracks in sync with the dry track. Those techniques insured 100%
non-destructive editing, so you could always go back to your original
recordings.

But increasingly faster CPU speeds eroded the advantages of the fast -- but
fixed speed -- on-soundcard processing that was MTU's forte (in addition to
their "floating tracks" feature). They just couldn't compete against far
cheaper alternatives such as CoolEdit and SAW that could run on the lowliest
16-bit SoundBlaster card. Around 1994, a fully equipped MTU system with
CPU, 4GB SCSI, SMPTE sync, and the complete software suite ran about $6500.
And that was a bargain compared to competing systems from Studer,
Digidesign, Otari, and Orban.

Getting back on topic, the rather independant nature of the MTU system
allows me to run virtually everything EXCEPT Acrobat just fine. But I'm so
far behind in the CPU race, I can't make any judgment of how background
operations might affect the CPU-intensive digital recording platforms of
today. When I do upgrade, I'll be using my current PII only for internet
access, and plan to use solid-state virtual drives such as Sony Memory Stick
to transfer files from the new dedicated, non-networked workstation to the
web. But at this point, that's gonna come after an upgrade to a premium
channel strip.

Jeff Jasper
Jeff Jasper Productions, West Funroe, La.
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 3:12:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 28 Jan 2005 07:47:37 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers)
wrote:

>> Examples that I'm curious about:
>> - Office 2003
>
>I have Word and Excel installed on my computer, but I think they're
>from Office 97. No problems.

Actually, older versions of Office installed FindFast by default.
This needs disabling. Easy enough, but it's probably the source of
the folk-wisdom about Office sabotaging a DAW :-)

It doesn't seem to be there in later versions.

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 3:13:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <l55401dnbv6tcbq0bhgor67csdj6t17n4j@4ax.com> l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk writes:

> Actually, older versions of Office installed FindFast by default.
> This needs disabling. Easy enough, but it's probably the source of
> the folk-wisdom about Office sabotaging a DAW :-)

I've heard of Fast Find. Where do I find it in order to disable it? I
can usually find what I'm looking for without a #%&*! computer helping
me.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 6:16:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> In article <l55401dnbv6tcbq0bhgor67csdj6t17n4j@4ax.com> l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk writes:
>
>
>>Actually, older versions of Office installed FindFast by default.
>>This needs disabling. Easy enough, but it's probably the source of
>>the folk-wisdom about Office sabotaging a DAW :-)
>
>
> I've heard of Fast Find. Where do I find it in order to disable it? I
> can usually find what I'm looking for without a #%&*! computer helping
> me.


Your startup folder.
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 11:05:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 3 Feb 2005 12:13:12 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:

>I've heard of Fast Find. Where do I find it in order to disable it? I
>can usually find what I'm looking for without a #%&*! computer helping
>me.


It showed up in Control Panel, I think. Hopefully, when installing
Office you took control instead of accepting defaults and never
installed it in the first place.

If you have disks formatted NTFS, you also have to watch out for the
Indexing Service. Great for office systems, but DAWs don't need it.
Turn it off in Properties for each partition.

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
February 3, 2005 11:05:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <jq050150lge6l39qjs7qvrp7umu31b3eqa@4ax.com> l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk writes:

> >I've heard of Fast Find. Where do I find it in order to disable it?

> It showed up in Control Panel, I think. Hopefully, when installing
> Office you took control instead of accepting defaults and never
> installed it in the first place.

I guess I must have been smart enough, because it doesn't show up in
the Control Panel. (I did find that reference - I just thought I might
not have been looking in the right place)

> If you have disks formatted NTFS, you also have to watch out for the
> Indexing Service. Great for office systems, but DAWs don't need it.
> Turn it off in Properties for each partition.

I do have that engaged. I'll turn it off and see if I notice any
difference. Though I really have only one computer that I use as a
DAW. The others are basically running office applications.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 4, 2005 4:10:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 3 Feb 2005 18:13:32 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:

>> If you have disks formatted NTFS, you also have to watch out for the
>> Indexing Service. Great for office systems, but DAWs don't need it.
>> Turn it off in Properties for each partition.
>
>I do have that engaged. I'll turn it off and see if I notice any
>difference. Though I really have only one computer that I use as a
>DAW. The others are basically running office applications.

To be honest, on a reasonably powerful system, you WON'T notice any
difference. The trick is (and has always been) to run a computer
well inside its limits. Now that the limits on even a
modestly-priced machine are 50+ tracks of audio and several
power-hungry effects, most of us can just coast along and not worry
about tweaks.

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