Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

AW16G vs VF 160EX

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 5:10:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'm looking for a HD recorder that will record up to 8 channels
simultaneosusly.

The Yamaha AW16G will do that and reviewers seem to agree it's good value.
So will the Fostex VF 160EX and it's a lot cheaper.

What's the snag?

I've noticed 4-band vs. 3- band EQ... but what else? Is the rest of the
signal processing in the Yamaha significantly better? Would I be missing
some important features with the Fostex?

Any insights or experience much appreciated.

Anahata

More about : aw16g 160ex

Anonymous
February 1, 2005 8:04:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> In article <41ff8e46$0$7947$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net>
anahata@treewind.co.uk writes:
>
> > The Yamaha AW16G will do that and reviewers seem to agree it's good
value.
> > So will the Fostex VF 160EX and it's a lot cheaper.
> > What's the snag?
>
> Each is more confusing to operate than the other. Check out the user
> interface carefully and pick the one that makes the most sense to
you.
> Also check the number and kind of inputs and outputs, built-in
> effects, integration with a CD writer if that's important to you.

That's exactly right. I've known a lot of people who have bought these
things, and the ones that have seen the most use have been the ones
that had the best user interfaces. 90% of purchasers for these things
never learn to use them properly.

In my very limited experience, I liked the Korg one (easy to use, touch
screen) and hated a Roland one (impossible to use, takes 4 push buttons
plus use of shift in order to arm a track).

Unlike learning how to use a compressor, or how to place a mic, or how
to use reverb, or even how to use software-based recording, you aren't
learning any leverageable skill with these things. You're just learning
how to use a Yamex ExG-Rev-Pro or whatever it is. Two years from now,
you will have outgrown it, had kids and given up recording, or it will
have broken, and you'll have to learn how to use the Fostaha
PXG-SuperTube, or whatever, and it'll be completely different.

So pick one that:
(1) doesn't require too much time investment to use
(2) has enough simultaneous record tracks and preamps (eg 2 is fine if
you record on your own, but you'll need 8 to get a whole band, and at
least 4 to get a real drum track down)
(3) something that you can back up

Everything else (FX etc) is secondary. You're not going to get
major-label quality with this and a $200 Chinese mic, so don't worry
about anything else. What you can do with these things is produce
decent quality demos, learn a lot about recording, and have a lot of
fun.

>
> In other words, do your own homework!
>
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
> However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
> lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
> you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
> and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 1, 2005 9:05:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <41ff8e46$0$7947$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net> anahata@treewind.co.uk writes:

> The Yamaha AW16G will do that and reviewers seem to agree it's good value.
> So will the Fostex VF 160EX and it's a lot cheaper.
> What's the snag?

Each is more confusing to operate than the other. Check out the user
interface carefully and pick the one that makes the most sense to you.
Also check the number and kind of inputs and outputs, built-in
effects, integration with a CD writer if that's important to you.

In other words, do your own homework!


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 4:28:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
>
> Each is more confusing to operate than the other. Check out the user
> interface carefully and pick the one that makes the most sense to you.

Yes: that's exactly the kind of detail that is very difficult to assess
until you've actually spent some time with the unit, which is one reason
why I asked here.

> Also check the number and kind of inputs and outputs, built-in
> effects
[...]

When I first posted they seemed to have similar specs - I've since seen
that the Yamaha's dynamics processing available on all channels
represents a hell of a lot more processing power than the Fostex's
single assignable compressor and FX unit.

> In other words, do your own homework!

Point well taken, but I counted asking here as part of the homework,
despite the risk (I know this group well enough!)

Thanks for taking any notice at all, anyway.

Anahata
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 4:28:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Anahanta:

A while back I, too, was looking into possibly purchasing an all-in-one
unit like the Yamaha. I spent some time on the AW16G website forum and got
questions answered there.

The prevailing notion seems to be that all these units are all about equal
in terms of operating ease. I fussed with each one in a store (guitar
center - what a place) and found the Yamaha "felt" the best in a cursory
taste test. It also looks more solid, but that could be clever marketing on
their part.

I am now looking at them again to purchase something for my son's middle
school band program. One of the teachers is technophobic and ease of use is
crucial. I've told them it's just nothing more than a big tape recorder.

Several years ago I bought a Roland VS 880 (used, for $1300!!) and found it
fine to operate, despite often hearing moans and groans about complicated
and nested menu options. I'm looking forward to using a Yamaha AW 16G after
that experience - ought to be a breeze.

Hope this helps.
Carlos
Anonymous
February 2, 2005 4:28:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <4200d5ca$0$44858$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net> anahata@treewind.co.uk writes:

> > Each is more confusing to operate than the other. Check out the user
> > interface carefully and pick the one that makes the most sense to you.
>
> Yes: that's exactly the kind of detail that is very difficult to assess
> until you've actually spent some time with the unit, which is one reason
> why I asked here.

There are a few things that all might agree on, but what might be
difficult for me might be obvious to you. This is why you should look
at these units yourself. And don't use the excuse that you don't have
a local dealer, or that your local dealer sells one but not the other.
You can start with looking at manuals, which may be downloadable from
the respective web sites. The content and clarity of the manuals can
tell you a lot about how it's going to be when yo use the actual
product. Maybe make a field trip, too. Drive a half a day to a dealer
who has stock, take a look at it, make friends with the salesman, buy
it if you're ready, otherwise get his card and tell him you'll call
him with an order once you make up your mind. Have a nice lunch. Go
back home and reflect on your day.

Alternately, buy the one that your gut tells you is right, and if you
don't like it after a week or two, return it. Most dealers will let
you do that, and if you have to do it by mail order, the most you'll
lose is the cost of shipping. $30 in postage is a small price to pay
compared to a couple of years of fighting a clumsy user interface that
sends you to the manual every time you want to record.

> When I first posted they seemed to have similar specs - I've since seen
> that the Yamaha's dynamics processing available on all channels
> represents a hell of a lot more processing power than the Fostex's
> single assignable compressor and FX unit.

Good job! If you're going to be using digital inputs and outputs, make
sure that you know what format they're in and that it's something you
can use. Nothing like standing there like a dummy with an RCA plug in
one hand and a TOSLink jack in the other. Do the mic inputs provide
phantom power? Is it 48V? Can you control the phantom power on each
input individually, or is there one switch for all inputs? Are the
line inputs balanced? How about the line outputs? How many headphone
outputs? If there are more than one, are there individual controls, at
least a volume control, for each? Can you send separate mixes to each?
None of those are likely to be show stoppers, but the all have to do
with how convenient it will be both to set up initially, and to grow
as your needs expand.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
!