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record audio over Wi-Fi?

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February 6, 2005 2:08:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I just started reading about Wi-Fi and I was wondering if it's
possible to use it for a silent remote control of sorts for recording.
You could make a fanless pc, maybe even with a no harddrive os and
then use something like SawStudio, which has some kind of tic/ip setup
and lets you network 2 pc's. The remote would be just a control pannel
really sending wi-fi to a separate maching that would have the hd and
so on. Would this work? Are there cheaper software packages that let
you run a separate pc as a remote over some kind of network? Thank
you. s.

More about : record audio

Anonymous
February 6, 2005 2:08:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <dstb01de12c4o0i4jvds30lv03hosaqu02@4ax.com> boomerang@msn.com writes:

> I just started reading about Wi-Fi and I was wondering if it's
> possible to use it for a silent remote control of sorts for recording.

Frontier Design already invented that and builds it cheaper than you
can. See their new Tranzport wireless remote controller at

http://www.frontierdesign.com/products/tranzmain.html


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 6, 2005 6:13:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Arny Krueger wrote:
> "spud" <metoo@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:D stb01de12c4o0i4jvds30lv03hosaqu02@4ax.com
> > I just started reading about Wi-Fi and I was wondering if it's
> > possible to use it for a silent remote control of sorts for
recording.
> > You could make a fanless pc, maybe even with a no harddrive os and
> > then use something like SawStudio, which has some kind of tic/ip
setup
> > and lets you network 2 pc's. The remote would be just a control
pannel
> > really sending wi-fi to a separate maching that would have the hd
and
> > so on. Would this work? Are there cheaper software packages that
let
> > you run a separate pc as a remote over some kind of network? Thank
> > you.
>
> You can remote control another PC running Windows XP Pro using the
Remote
> Desktop Facility:

I've done this on occasion, and it works quite well. I can also use
remote desktop from my wi-fi enabled PDA.

John
Related resources
Anonymous
February 6, 2005 7:39:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"spud" <metoo@msn.com> wrote in message
news:D stb01de12c4o0i4jvds30lv03hosaqu02@4ax.com
> I just started reading about Wi-Fi and I was wondering if it's
> possible to use it for a silent remote control of sorts for recording.
> You could make a fanless pc, maybe even with a no harddrive os and
> then use something like SawStudio, which has some kind of tic/ip setup
> and lets you network 2 pc's. The remote would be just a control pannel
> really sending wi-fi to a separate maching that would have the hd and
> so on. Would this work? Are there cheaper software packages that let
> you run a separate pc as a remote over some kind of network? Thank
> you.

You can remote control another PC running Windows XP Pro using the Remote
Desktop Facility:

From the XP Help system:

Remote Desktop overview

With Remote Desktop on Windows XP Professional, you can have access to a
Windows session that is running on your computer when you are at another
computer. This means, for example, that you can connect to your work
computer from home and have access to all of your applications, files, and
network resources as though you were in front of your computer at work. You
can leave programs running at work and when you get home, you can see your
desktop at work displayed on your home computer, with the same programs
running.
When you connect to your computer at work, Remote Desktop automatically
locks that computer so no one else can access your applications and files
while you are gone. When you come back to your computer at work, you can
unlock it by typing CTRL+ALT+DEL.

Remote Desktop also allows more than one user to have active sessions on a
single computer. This means that multiple users can leave
their applications running and preserve the state of their Windows session
even while others are logged on.

With Fast User Switching, you can easily switch from one user to another on
the same computer. For example, suppose you are working at home and have
logged on to the computer at your office to update an expense report. While
you are working, a family member needs to use your home computer to check
for an important email message. You can disconnect Remote Desktop, allow the
other user to log on and check mail, and then reconnect to the computer at
your office, where you see the expense report exactly as you left it. Fast
User Switching works on standalone computers and computers that are members
of workgroups.

Remote Desktop enables a variety of scenarios, including:

Working at home - Access work in progress on your office computer from home,
including full access to all local and remote devices.

Collaborating - Bring your desktop to a colleague's office to debug some
code, update a Microsoft PowerPoint slide presentation, or proofread a
document.

Sharing a console - Allow multiple users to maintain separate program and
configuration sessions on a single computer, such as at a teller station or
a sales desk.

To use Remote Desktop, you need the following:

A computer running Windows XP Professional ("remote" computer) with a
connection to a Local Area Network or the Internet.
A second computer ("home" computer) with access to the Local Area Network
via network connection, modem, or Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection.
This computer must have Remote Desktop Connection, formerly called the
Terminal Services client, installed.

Appropriate user accounts and permissions.
February 7, 2005 3:32:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I assume that you can not direct monitor the remote audio by this method.
Is that true?

For the "XP Home" users or for cross platform within windows machines try,
"Netmeeting". It works for remote control over wifi. Still playing to get
the monitor function to work but it looks like the audio will be limited to
8 bit and low bandwidth.

To activate Netmeeting within xp home, Start-Run-(type)Conf

Rich

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:Nvydnas5m6flE5vfRVn-pw@comcast.com...
> "spud" <metoo@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:D stb01de12c4o0i4jvds30lv03hosaqu02@4ax.com
>> I just started reading about Wi-Fi and I was wondering if it's
>> possible to use it for a silent remote control of sorts for recording.
>> You could make a fanless pc, maybe even with a no harddrive os and
>> then use something like SawStudio, which has some kind of tic/ip setup
>> and lets you network 2 pc's. The remote would be just a control pannel
>> really sending wi-fi to a separate maching that would have the hd and
>> so on. Would this work? Are there cheaper software packages that let
>> you run a separate pc as a remote over some kind of network? Thank
>> you.
>
> You can remote control another PC running Windows XP Pro using the Remote
> Desktop Facility:
>
> From the XP Help system:
>
> Remote Desktop overview
>
> With Remote Desktop on Windows XP Professional, you can have access to a
> Windows session that is running on your computer when you are at another
> computer. This means, for example, that you can connect to your work
> computer from home and have access to all of your applications, files, and
> network resources as though you were in front of your computer at work.
> You can leave programs running at work and when you get home, you can see
> your desktop at work displayed on your home computer, with the same
> programs running.
> When you connect to your computer at work, Remote Desktop automatically
> locks that computer so no one else can access your applications and files
> while you are gone. When you come back to your computer at work, you can
> unlock it by typing CTRL+ALT+DEL.
>
> Remote Desktop also allows more than one user to have active sessions on a
> single computer. This means that multiple users can leave
> their applications running and preserve the state of their Windows session
> even while others are logged on.
>
> With Fast User Switching, you can easily switch from one user to another
> on the same computer. For example, suppose you are working at home and
> have logged on to the computer at your office to update an expense report.
> While you are working, a family member needs to use your home computer to
> check for an important email message. You can disconnect Remote Desktop,
> allow the other user to log on and check mail, and then reconnect to the
> computer at your office, where you see the expense report exactly as you
> left it. Fast User Switching works on standalone computers and computers
> that are members of workgroups.
>
> Remote Desktop enables a variety of scenarios, including:
>
> Working at home - Access work in progress on your office computer from
> home, including full access to all local and remote devices.
>
> Collaborating - Bring your desktop to a colleague's office to debug some
> code, update a Microsoft PowerPoint slide presentation, or proofread a
> document.
>
> Sharing a console - Allow multiple users to maintain separate program and
> configuration sessions on a single computer, such as at a teller station
> or a sales desk.
>
> To use Remote Desktop, you need the following:
>
> A computer running Windows XP Professional ("remote" computer) with a
> connection to a Local Area Network or the Internet.
> A second computer ("home" computer) with access to the Local Area Network
> via network connection, modem, or Virtual Private Network (VPN)
> connection. This computer must have Remote Desktop Connection, formerly
> called the Terminal Services client, installed.
>
> Appropriate user accounts and permissions.
>
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 5:42:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Wow!
Many thanks for this Mike. A great piece of advise.

Evangelos


%
Evangelos Himonides
IoE, University of London
tel: +44 2076126599
fax: +44 2076126741


"Allas to those who never sing but die with all their music in them..."

Oliver Wendell Holmes
%
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 9:39:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Rich" <RichPeet@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4-idne1c1d-yKZrfRVn-1A@comcast.com

> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:Nvydnas5m6flE5vfRVn-pw@comcast.com...

>> "spud" <metoo@msn.com> wrote in message
>> news:D stb01de12c4o0i4jvds30lv03hosaqu02@4ax.com

>>> I just started reading about Wi-Fi and I was wondering if it's
>>> possible to use it for a silent remote control of sorts for
>>> recording. You could make a fanless pc, maybe even with a no
>>> harddrive os and then use something like SawStudio, which has some
>>> kind of tic/ip setup and lets you network 2 pc's. The remote would
>>> be just a control pannel really sending wi-fi to a separate maching
>>> that would have the hd and so on. Would this work? Are there
>>> cheaper software packages that let you run a separate pc as a
>>> remote over some kind of network? Thank you.

>> You can remote control another PC running Windows XP Pro using the
>> Remote Desktop Facility:


> I assume that you can not direct monitor the remote audio by this
> method. Is that true?

My recollection is that Remote Desktop supports playback on the controlling
machine via the remote machine's primary audio interface.

IOW if the remote machine plays some sound on its primary audio interface,
you hear that sound played on the primary audio interface of the machine
that is controlling it.
Anonymous
February 9, 2005 5:59:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <znr1107694383k@trad>, mrivers@d-and-d.com says...
>
> In article <dstb01de12c4o0i4jvds30lv03hosaqu02@4ax.com> boomerang@msn.com writes:
>
> > I just started reading about Wi-Fi and I was wondering if it's
> > possible to use it for a silent remote control of sorts for recording.
>
> Frontier Design already invented that and builds it cheaper than you
> can. See their new Tranzport wireless remote controller at
>
> http://www.frontierdesign.com/products/tranzmain.html
>
Wow! What cool idea.

But from what I see on their Web page, it's not Wi-Fi, I.e., TCP/IP
wireless. I *think* it's just(!) a Part 15 2-way RF gizmo, like a
cordless phone. (Remind me to check if my cordless phone interferes with
it...)

Jason
Anonymous
February 9, 2005 3:53:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <MPG.1c7346953f823208989812@news.verizon.net> cipher@sitefinder.verisign.com writes:

> > http://www.frontierdesign.com/products/tranzmain.html

> But from what I see on their Web page, it's not Wi-Fi, I.e., TCP/IP
> wireless. I *think* it's just(!) a Part 15 2-way RF gizmo, like a
> cordless phone. (Remind me to check if my cordless phone interferes with
> it...)

Technically, not, it does not go through the network protocol. It does
use the same frequency band (2.4 GHz I think) as the common wireless
networking systems. See if your wireless LAN interferes with it.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 9, 2005 11:33:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

spud <boomerang@msn.com> wrote:

>I just started reading about Wi-Fi and I was wondering if it's
>possible to use it for a silent remote control of sorts for recording.

PDAs have software that let you control them from a desktop PC over
WiFi, so that idea should work fine.

We go that idea one better in our PDAudio system. We record digital
audio from a PDA using WiFi to a network server. The network server is
the audio storage device.

--
Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
!