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Take Ownership on Win 7 of XP HDD folders, now inaccesible on XP

Tags:
  • Configuration
  • Windows 7
  • Hard Drives
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows 7
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June 13, 2012 4:09:30 AM

Hi there,

I've recently installed windows 7 on a seperate SSD drive, with XP being on a different drive. I couldn't access my XP HDD files while running from Windows 7, so i followed some guidance online stating to 'Take Ownership' of the files, and that it wouldn't affect how XP operates.

However after doing so, when booting XP, when i try to access those folders it says Access Denied.

I've tried setting the username and password to be the same for both OSs and the PC name and workgroup, none o which has helped, and there seem to be so many options and tutorials for sharing, but most of them relate to being on a network with other PCs.

How do i get these files back working with XP? My desktop files associated with my username won't load, and says Access Denied. In Win 7 the folders also show a little lock over them, but i can still get into them in windows 7, but not xp, pretty much the opposite of before

Help would be appreciated greatly

invertedzero

More about : ownership win hdd folders inaccesible

a b $ Windows 7
June 13, 2012 1:24:21 PM

I have had that same issue. Unfortunately, setting the same username and password doesn't do any good, because the ownership is given to a unique ID, and the unique ID will be different on the two systems because it is - wait for it - unique. It looks like S-1-5-21-346691086-2920044697-4026809194-4451.

If you change ownership, then the login on the old system won't be able to access the files.

There are two solutions that I use, both of which involve changing the security settings on the files. The first is to give all users full access to the files, removing all security control. This is, of course, risky security on a shared machine. The second is to log in as admin on the system from which you cannot access the files, and edit the protection to add a new entry. Add the equivalent user on this system, and grant full protection.

Each system will now see the files as controllable by the user that you want, plus one unknown user which is actually the same login on the other system.

You can do this to a directory and have it applied to all files in the directory tree. If you like this idea and need more specific directions, let me know.

---------------

For a longer-range solution, install the XP virtual machine in Win7 to run your XP programs, and scrub the XP boot. Of course, this will mean that you will have to reinstall and reconfigure everything; many people prefer to keep two boots so that they don't have to do this. Have fun.
June 13, 2012 2:21:06 PM

WyomingKnott said:
I have had that same issue. Unfortunately, setting the same username and password doesn't do any good, because the ownership is given to a unique ID, and the unique ID will be different on the two systems because it is - wait for it - unique. It looks like S-1-5-21-346691086-2920044697-4026809194-4451.

If you change ownership, then the login on the old system won't be able to access the files.

There are two solutions that I use, both of which involve changing the security settings on the files. The first is to give all users full access to the files, removing all security control. This is, of course, risky security on a shared machine. The second is to log in as admin on the system from which you cannot access the files, and edit the protection to add a new entry. Add the equivalent user on this system, and grant full protection.

Each system will now see the files as controllable by the user that you want, plus one unknown user which is actually the same login on the other system.

You can do this to a directory and have it applied to all files in the directory tree. If you like this idea and need more specific directions, let me know.

---------------

For a longer-range solution, install the XP virtual machine in Win7 to run your XP programs, and scrub the XP boot. Of course, this will mean that you will have to reinstall and reconfigure everything; many people prefer to keep two boots so that they don't have to do this. Have fun.


Hi WyomingKnot, thanks for your reply.

It's an absolute pain that microsoft designed it this way, and by the looks of comments on a page i found when browsing, it looks like near 100% of users find it to be annoying.

I would be interested in doing the second method, as my computer is on shared wifi with a person i'm living with that i don't know very well, so the first would be unsuitable. How would i go about doing this?
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June 14, 2012 11:50:06 AM

Hi i was wondering if anyone could instruct me how to do the second method described above by WyomingKnot. I don't really want to make a further mess of it by guess / trail and improvement.

Thanks
a b $ Windows 7
June 14, 2012 1:32:27 PM

Since you aren't familiar with this, I'll post step-by-step instructions. I can even add pictures this evening, if it will help. But if you will be doing this in Win7 and I am on XP at work, I may miss a detail until I get back to this at home tonight.

Log in as an admin. Use Windoze Explorer to navigate to the root directory of the directory tree in question (or one of the many). Right-click on the directory, select Properties, and go to the Security tab. If you are in the OS where you do not have access to the files, you may see permissions for something like S-1-5-21-346691086-2920044697-4026809194-4451 to have full access.

Select Advanced. Don't touch Ownership. Instead, on the Permissions tab, select Add. Type in the relevant user name, or click on Check Names and select the relevant user name. Press OK, which will take you to the Permission Entry screen. Select Allow Full Control. Click OK, and you will go back to the Permissions tab.

VERY IMPORTANT: Select "Replace permission entries on all child objects with entries shown here that apply to child objects," and deselect "Inherit from Parent." This will allow your choices to propagate down the entire directory tree. Click on Apply and see what happens.

Pick some random file in the directory or further down the tree, select Properties, Security, and check that the specified login now has full control.

Let me know if this isn't what it looks like on Win7, and I'll re-do this tonight.
June 14, 2012 7:46:52 PM

WyomingKnott said:
Since you aren't familiar with this, I'll post step-by-step instructions. I can even add pictures this evening, if it will help. But if you will be doing this in Win7 and I am on XP at work, I may miss a detail until I get back to this at home tonight.

Log in as an admin. Use Windoze Explorer to navigate to the root directory of the directory tree in question (or one of the many). Right-click on the directory, select Properties, and go to the Security tab. If you are in the OS where you do not have access to the files, you may see permissions for something like S-1-5-21-346691086-2920044697-4026809194-4451 to have full access.

Select Advanced. Don't touch Ownership. Instead, on the Permissions tab, select Add. Type in the relevant user name, or click on Check Names and select the relevant user name. Press OK, which will take you to the Permission Entry screen. Select Allow Full Control. Click OK, and you will go back to the Permissions tab.

VERY IMPORTANT: Select "Replace permission entries on all child objects with entries shown here that apply to child objects," and deselect "Inherit from Parent." This will allow your choices to propagate down the entire directory tree. Click on Apply and see what happens.

Pick some random file in the directory or further down the tree, select Properties, Security, and check that the specified login now has full control.

Let me know if this isn't what it looks like on Win7, and I'll re-do this tonight.


Aha! Yes i've followed it and managed to figure it out, i understand more how to do it now. Tried it with one file first then rebooted to see if there were any problems. The child/parent inheritance options helped a lot. So if in future i try to access a folder where Win 7 does not have ownership and it doesn't allow me to access or modify permissions, I take ownership in windows 7, then inherit the win XP (S-1-5-21...) permission from parents, or push down those permissions from an above folder to child ones. I did this from the root folder so most, if not all have permissions for boths OSs now.

Really appreciate your help with this WyomingKnot. Many Thanks!
December 3, 2012 2:37:50 PM

I have a similar problem, I encrypted one xp file (right click, properties, advance, encrypt contents to secure data) my computer broke so I took the hard drive out slaved it in my windows 7.

When I try to open it says, user does not have access privileges, I have full control for administrator and user
!