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Pat Tillman Killed in Afghanistan

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April 23, 2004 7:56:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

This really shook me. After the story about his death I pasted on one
written about a year ago about him leaving the NFL. He's a real hero.

Tillman killed in Afghanistan

CNN: Former Cardinals safety was serving in U.S. Army in Afghanistan
Posted: Friday April 23, 2004 11:36AM; Updated: Friday April 23, 2004
11:37AM

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Former NFL player Pat Tillman was killed Thursday while
serving as an Army Special Forces soldier on a mission in southeastern
Afghanistan, Pentagon officials have told CNN. 

Tillman, who walked away from a $3.6 million contract as a safety with the
Arizona Cardinals to join the military after the Sept. 11 attacks, was in an
area where numerous U.S. troops have been killed in battles with suspected
al Qaeda and Taliban fighters.

He was serving as an Army Ranger, part of the Army's Special Forces.The
officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said a formal
announcement was expected later in the day.

Spokesmen at the Pentagon and U.S. Army declined comment.

There were no immediate details on his death.

A military official, also speaking on the condition of anonymity, said that
a soldier had been killed in action in Afghanistan on Thursday, but could
not confirm that the soldier was Tillman.

Tillman played four seasons with the Cardinals before enlisting in the Army
in May 2002.

His brother, Kevin, a former minor league baseball prospect in the
Cleveland Indians' organization, also joined the Rangers and served in the
Middle East.

More details are forthcoming.

Tillman follows beat of a different drum

By Tom Barnidge
NFL Insider

(March 20, 2003) -- Those who know Pat Tillman know that he always has
welcomed a challenge.

As a youth, he high-dived from bridges and cliffs. At Arizona State, he
hopped the fence at Sun Devil Stadium and climbed a light tower. Before
reporting for training camp with the Arizona Cardinals two years ago, he
competed in a 70-mile triathlon.

"He's like Forrest Gump. He tries everything," says Frank Sanders, his
former teammate.

So no one should have been surprised last spring when Tillman, entering his
fourth NFL season, shucked it all and joined his brother, Kevin, in setting
out to become an Army Ranger. What's a three-year, $3.6 million pro football
contract when you can collect $18,000 a year from Uncle Sam?

"Pat has very deep and true convictions," Cardinals coach Dave McGinnis
said at the time. "He's a deep thinker, and believe me, this was something
he thought out."

Tillman made no public statement. He wasn't in this for the publicity. But
you didn't need to dig too deeply to find an explanation for his actions.
Friends said that the 9/11 terrorist attacks had affected him deeply.
Cardinals defensive coordinator Larry Marmie, after a conversation with his
former player, said Tillman felt he needed to "pay something back" for the
comfortable life he had been afforded.

Whatever his rationale, he clearly was serious about his pursuit. He and
Kevin completed basic training in July and advanced through individual
training in October. They graduated from parachute school in November, and
completed the Ranger Indoctrination Program in December. Just that quickly,
Tillman was assigned to the second battalion of the 75th Ranger Regiment in
Fort Lewis, Washington.

"He's a full-fledged Ranger now," Army spokesperson Carol Darby reported.
"He's ready for combat. He will move with his unit for whatever that unit is
involved in."

The 75th Ranger Regiment was deployed recently, presumably to the Middle
East. If the description that the Army attaches to the unit ("flexible,
highly trained, and rapidly deployed light infantry force with specialized
skills") is any measure, the 75th likely will wind up in the middle of the
most serious action.

You can be sure that Tillman will be prepared for the challenge. He
succeeds at just about everything he sets out to do.

ConsiderŠ

He arrived at Arizona State in 1994 on the school's last remaining football
scholarship, landing a spot on the end of the bench, where dreams go to
expire. He left four seasons later as the Pac-10 Conference Defensive Player
of the Year.

He was selected by the Cardinals with the 226th pick of the 1998 draft --
the league packed up and went home after pick 241 -- and five months later,
he was Arizona's starting strong safety.

This is a fellow who doesn't know the meaning of fail -- on the field, in
the classroom, or anywhere else. He had a 3.84 grade-point average at ASU
and graduated with a degree in marketing in 3? years.

Pat Tillman is nothing if not unusual. In college, he played linebacker,
where he was thought to be too small. In the NFL, he played safety, where he
was thought to be too slow. When he set a club record for tackles in 2000
and attracted the interest of another team, the St. Louis Rams, he declined
their five-year offer sheet out of loyalty to the club that had drafted him.

NFL players hardly have been strangers to military service. Roger Staubach
served four years after graduating from the Naval Academy before joining the
Dallas Cowboys as a 27-year-old rookie in 1969. Rocky Bleier of the
Pittsburgh Steelers nearly lost a leg to a land mine when he did a tour of
duty in Vietnam.

But the list of names grows a little shorter when it comes to NFL players
who have walked away from million-dollar contracts in the prime of their
careers.

The story that comes to mind is one told by Bruce Snyder, Tillman's coach
at Arizona State. It seems that Snyder planned to redshirt Tillman as a
freshman, extending his eligibility by a season. Of course, that would
necessitate Tillman remaining in college for an extra year.

"You can do whatever you want with me," Tillman said, "but in four years
I'm gone. I've got things to do with my life."

Obviously, he still does.
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 8:11:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

>This really shook me. After the story about his death I pasted on one
>written about a year ago about him leaving the NFL. He's a real hero.

I don't mean to belittle Tillman any, but all 700+ who have been killed are
real heroes.
April 23, 2004 8:33:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

On 4/23/04 11:11 AM, in article
5340febf2bb8e2367c07094e1b568824@news.teranews.com, "slidge"
<slidge@slidge.com.invalid> wrote:

>
>> This really shook me. After the story about his death I pasted on one
>> written about a year ago about him leaving the NFL. He's a real hero.
>
> I don't mean to belittle Tillman any, but all 700+ who have been killed are
> real heroes.
>

True enough. But he did walk away from a 3.6 mill a year for 3 years to to
serve his country. He was 26, and headed into the prime of his career. He
was 27 when he was killed.

Jayhawker
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 9:53:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

Hero, my ass.

He was just another thoughtless little thug brainwashed into Uncle Sam's Oil
Army.

The men, women and children defending their land, homes and traditions from
Bush's Storm Troopers -- they're the heroes.


"Jayhawker" <rock.chalk@jayhawks.net> wrote in message
news:BCAEA75D.1EC57%rock.chalk@jayhawks.net...
> This really shook me. After the story about his death I pasted on one
> written about a year ago about him leaving the NFL. He's a real hero.
>
> Tillman killed in Afghanistan
>
> CNN: Former Cardinals safety was serving in U.S. Army in Afghanistan
> Posted: Friday April 23, 2004 11:36AM; Updated: Friday April 23, 2004
> 11:37AM
>
> WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Former NFL player Pat Tillman was killed Thursday
while
> serving as an Army Special Forces soldier on a mission in southeastern
> Afghanistan, Pentagon officials have told CNN.
>
> Tillman, who walked away from a $3.6 million contract as a safety with
the
> Arizona Cardinals to join the military after the Sept. 11 attacks, was in
an
> area where numerous U.S. troops have been killed in battles with suspected
> al Qaeda and Taliban fighters.
>
> He was serving as an Army Ranger, part of the Army's Special Forces.The
> officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said a formal
> announcement was expected later in the day.
>
> Spokesmen at the Pentagon and U.S. Army declined comment.
>
> There were no immediate details on his death.
>
> A military official, also speaking on the condition of anonymity, said
that
> a soldier had been killed in action in Afghanistan on Thursday, but could
> not confirm that the soldier was Tillman.
>
> Tillman played four seasons with the Cardinals before enlisting in the
Army
> in May 2002.
>
> His brother, Kevin, a former minor league baseball prospect in the
> Cleveland Indians' organization, also joined the Rangers and served in the
> Middle East.
>
> More details are forthcoming.
>
> Tillman follows beat of a different drum
>
> By Tom Barnidge
> NFL Insider
>
> (March 20, 2003) -- Those who know Pat Tillman know that he always has
> welcomed a challenge.
>
> As a youth, he high-dived from bridges and cliffs. At Arizona State, he
> hopped the fence at Sun Devil Stadium and climbed a light tower. Before
> reporting for training camp with the Arizona Cardinals two years ago, he
> competed in a 70-mile triathlon.
>
> "He's like Forrest Gump. He tries everything," says Frank Sanders, his
> former teammate.
>
> So no one should have been surprised last spring when Tillman, entering
his
> fourth NFL season, shucked it all and joined his brother, Kevin, in
setting
> out to become an Army Ranger. What's a three-year, $3.6 million pro
football
> contract when you can collect $18,000 a year from Uncle Sam?
>
> "Pat has very deep and true convictions," Cardinals coach Dave McGinnis
> said at the time. "He's a deep thinker, and believe me, this was something
> he thought out."
>
> Tillman made no public statement. He wasn't in this for the publicity.
But
> you didn't need to dig too deeply to find an explanation for his actions.
> Friends said that the 9/11 terrorist attacks had affected him deeply.
> Cardinals defensive coordinator Larry Marmie, after a conversation with
his
> former player, said Tillman felt he needed to "pay something back" for the
> comfortable life he had been afforded.
>
> Whatever his rationale, he clearly was serious about his pursuit. He and
> Kevin completed basic training in July and advanced through individual
> training in October. They graduated from parachute school in November, and
> completed the Ranger Indoctrination Program in December. Just that
quickly,
> Tillman was assigned to the second battalion of the 75th Ranger Regiment
in
> Fort Lewis, Washington.
>
> "He's a full-fledged Ranger now," Army spokesperson Carol Darby reported.
> "He's ready for combat. He will move with his unit for whatever that unit
is
> involved in."
>
> The 75th Ranger Regiment was deployed recently, presumably to the Middle
> East. If the description that the Army attaches to the unit ("flexible,
> highly trained, and rapidly deployed light infantry force with specialized
> skills") is any measure, the 75th likely will wind up in the middle of the
> most serious action.
>
> You can be sure that Tillman will be prepared for the challenge. He
> succeeds at just about everything he sets out to do.
>
> ConsiderS
>
> He arrived at Arizona State in 1994 on the school's last remaining
football
> scholarship, landing a spot on the end of the bench, where dreams go to
> expire. He left four seasons later as the Pac-10 Conference Defensive
Player
> of the Year.
>
> He was selected by the Cardinals with the 226th pick of the 1998 draft --
> the league packed up and went home after pick 241 -- and five months
later,
> he was Arizona's starting strong safety.
>
> This is a fellow who doesn't know the meaning of fail -- on the field, in
> the classroom, or anywhere else. He had a 3.84 grade-point average at ASU
> and graduated with a degree in marketing in 3? years.
>
> Pat Tillman is nothing if not unusual. In college, he played linebacker,
> where he was thought to be too small. In the NFL, he played safety, where
he
> was thought to be too slow. When he set a club record for tackles in 2000
> and attracted the interest of another team, the St. Louis Rams, he
declined
> their five-year offer sheet out of loyalty to the club that had drafted
him.
>
> NFL players hardly have been strangers to military service. Roger
Staubach
> served four years after graduating from the Naval Academy before joining
the
> Dallas Cowboys as a 27-year-old rookie in 1969. Rocky Bleier of the
> Pittsburgh Steelers nearly lost a leg to a land mine when he did a tour of
> duty in Vietnam.
>
> But the list of names grows a little shorter when it comes to NFL players
> who have walked away from million-dollar contracts in the prime of their
> careers.
>
> The story that comes to mind is one told by Bruce Snyder, Tillman's coach
> at Arizona State. It seems that Snyder planned to redshirt Tillman as a
> freshman, extending his eligibility by a season. Of course, that would
> necessitate Tillman remaining in college for an extra year.
>
> "You can do whatever you want with me," Tillman said, "but in four years
> I'm gone. I've got things to do with my life."
>
> Obviously, he still does.
>
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 9:57:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"John Sterren" <sterren22@gawab.com> wrote in message
news:c6c37p$ack9a$1@ID-227569.news.uni-berlin.de...
> Hero, my ass.
>
> He was just another thoughtless little thug brainwashed into Uncle Sam's
Oil
> Army.

Damn, boy! You got some issues...
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 10:15:30 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

>True enough. But he did walk away from a 3.6 mill a year for 3 years to to
>serve his country. He was 26, and headed into the prime of his career. He
>was 27 when he was killed.
>
>Jayhawker

Actually it was 3.6 million for 3 years, not 3.6 million per year. But we get
the point. This is a pretty sad story. He's no more a hero than any other
soldier over there, but the fact that he turned down millions of dollars just
makes this more sad.
April 23, 2004 10:15:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

thirdandten@aol.comNoSpAm (ThE AnArKrIsT) wrote in message news:<20040423141530.05533.00000205@mb-m06.aol.com>...
> >True enough. But he did walk away from a 3.6 mill a year for 3 years to to
> >serve his country. He was 26, and headed into the prime of his career. He
> >was 27 when he was killed.
> >
> >Jayhawker
>
> Actually it was 3.6 million for 3 years, not 3.6 million per year. But we get
> the point. This is a pretty sad story. He's no more a hero than any other
> soldier over there, but the fact that he turned down millions of dollars just
> makes this more sad.


Very sad indeed. My prayers go out to him and his family.


Kyle
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 11:28:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

> He's no more a hero than any other soldier over there ..

I'll agree with that statement. However, ya gotta tip the hat to the
"patriotism" showed. Walking away from the "lifestyle" and all its
trappings, the money, the celebrity, the adulation of 80,000 people for
every home game .. the whole experience ..

That's .. that's .. a little different level of patriotism than living in
the ghetto in Watts and you can sell crack or go in the military.

I hope the NFL does something .. anything .. to honor one of their fallen
and I hope it is more significant than a moment of silence opening Sunday.

This was truly a special person.

JB
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 11:28:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"JawBreaker" <NOSPAMJawBreaker@stealrage.com> wrote in message
news:57eic.63048$B%4.5076@fe2.columbus.rr.com...
>
> > He's no more a hero than any other soldier over there ..
>
> I'll agree with that statement. However, ya gotta tip the hat to the
> "patriotism" showed. Walking away from the "lifestyle" and all its
> trappings, the money, the celebrity, the adulation of 80,000 people for
> every home game .. the whole experience ..

80,000 people? Didn't he play for Arizona? Maybe you meant 18,000 people.
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 11:42:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"John Sterren" <sterren22@gawab.com> wrote in message
news:c6c37p$ack9a$1@ID-227569.news.uni-berlin.de...
> Hero, my ass.
>
> He was just another thoughtless little thug brainwashed into Uncle Sam's
Oil
> Army.
>
> The men, women and children defending their land, homes and traditions
from
> Bush's Storm Troopers -- they're the heroes.


Top posting communist'S LIKE YOU NEED TO MOVE TO CUBA!

You hate this country and we hate you!

>
> "Jayhawker" <rock.chalk@jayhawks.net> wrote in message
> news:BCAEA75D.1EC57%rock.chalk@jayhawks.net...
> > This really shook me. After the story about his death I pasted on one
> > written about a year ago about him leaving the NFL. He's a real hero.
> >
> > Tillman killed in Afghanistan
> >
> > CNN: Former Cardinals safety was serving in U.S. Army in Afghanistan
> > Posted: Friday April 23, 2004 11:36AM; Updated: Friday April 23, 2004
> > 11:37AM
> >
> > WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Former NFL player Pat Tillman was killed Thursday
> while
> > serving as an Army Special Forces soldier on a mission in southeastern
> > Afghanistan, Pentagon officials have told CNN.
> >
> > Tillman, who walked away from a $3.6 million contract as a safety with
> the
> > Arizona Cardinals to join the military after the Sept. 11 attacks, was
in
> an
> > area where numerous U.S. troops have been killed in battles with
suspected
> > al Qaeda and Taliban fighters.
> >
> > He was serving as an Army Ranger, part of the Army's Special Forces.The
> > officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said a formal
> > announcement was expected later in the day.
> >
> > Spokesmen at the Pentagon and U.S. Army declined comment.
> >
> > There were no immediate details on his death.
> >
> > A military official, also speaking on the condition of anonymity, said
> that
> > a soldier had been killed in action in Afghanistan on Thursday, but
could
> > not confirm that the soldier was Tillman.
> >
> > Tillman played four seasons with the Cardinals before enlisting in the
> Army
> > in May 2002.
> >
> > His brother, Kevin, a former minor league baseball prospect in the
> > Cleveland Indians' organization, also joined the Rangers and served in
the
> > Middle East.
> >
> > More details are forthcoming.
> >
> > Tillman follows beat of a different drum
> >
> > By Tom Barnidge
> > NFL Insider
> >
> > (March 20, 2003) -- Those who know Pat Tillman know that he always has
> > welcomed a challenge.
> >
> > As a youth, he high-dived from bridges and cliffs. At Arizona State, he
> > hopped the fence at Sun Devil Stadium and climbed a light tower. Before
> > reporting for training camp with the Arizona Cardinals two years ago,
he
> > competed in a 70-mile triathlon.
> >
> > "He's like Forrest Gump. He tries everything," says Frank Sanders, his
> > former teammate.
> >
> > So no one should have been surprised last spring when Tillman, entering
> his
> > fourth NFL season, shucked it all and joined his brother, Kevin, in
> setting
> > out to become an Army Ranger. What's a three-year, $3.6 million pro
> football
> > contract when you can collect $18,000 a year from Uncle Sam?
> >
> > "Pat has very deep and true convictions," Cardinals coach Dave McGinnis
> > said at the time. "He's a deep thinker, and believe me, this was
something
> > he thought out."
> >
> > Tillman made no public statement. He wasn't in this for the publicity.
> But
> > you didn't need to dig too deeply to find an explanation for his
actions.
> > Friends said that the 9/11 terrorist attacks had affected him deeply.
> > Cardinals defensive coordinator Larry Marmie, after a conversation with
> his
> > former player, said Tillman felt he needed to "pay something back" for
the
> > comfortable life he had been afforded.
> >
> > Whatever his rationale, he clearly was serious about his pursuit. He
and
> > Kevin completed basic training in July and advanced through individual
> > training in October. They graduated from parachute school in November,
and
> > completed the Ranger Indoctrination Program in December. Just that
> quickly,
> > Tillman was assigned to the second battalion of the 75th Ranger Regiment
> in
> > Fort Lewis, Washington.
> >
> > "He's a full-fledged Ranger now," Army spokesperson Carol Darby
reported.
> > "He's ready for combat. He will move with his unit for whatever that
unit
> is
> > involved in."
> >
> > The 75th Ranger Regiment was deployed recently, presumably to the
Middle
> > East. If the description that the Army attaches to the unit ("flexible,
> > highly trained, and rapidly deployed light infantry force with
specialized
> > skills") is any measure, the 75th likely will wind up in the middle of
the
> > most serious action.
> >
> > You can be sure that Tillman will be prepared for the challenge. He
> > succeeds at just about everything he sets out to do.
> >
> > ConsiderS
> >
> > He arrived at Arizona State in 1994 on the school's last remaining
> football
> > scholarship, landing a spot on the end of the bench, where dreams go to
> > expire. He left four seasons later as the Pac-10 Conference Defensive
> Player
> > of the Year.
> >
> > He was selected by the Cardinals with the 226th pick of the 1998
draft --
> > the league packed up and went home after pick 241 -- and five months
> later,
> > he was Arizona's starting strong safety.
> >
> > This is a fellow who doesn't know the meaning of fail -- on the field,
in
> > the classroom, or anywhere else. He had a 3.84 grade-point average at
ASU
> > and graduated with a degree in marketing in 3? years.
> >
> > Pat Tillman is nothing if not unusual. In college, he played
linebacker,
> > where he was thought to be too small. In the NFL, he played safety,
where
> he
> > was thought to be too slow. When he set a club record for tackles in
2000
> > and attracted the interest of another team, the St. Louis Rams, he
> declined
> > their five-year offer sheet out of loyalty to the club that had drafted
> him.
> >
> > NFL players hardly have been strangers to military service. Roger
> Staubach
> > served four years after graduating from the Naval Academy before joining
> the
> > Dallas Cowboys as a 27-year-old rookie in 1969. Rocky Bleier of the
> > Pittsburgh Steelers nearly lost a leg to a land mine when he did a tour
of
> > duty in Vietnam.
> >
> > But the list of names grows a little shorter when it comes to NFL
players
> > who have walked away from million-dollar contracts in the prime of their
> > careers.
> >
> > The story that comes to mind is one told by Bruce Snyder, Tillman's
coach
> > at Arizona State. It seems that Snyder planned to redshirt Tillman as a
> > freshman, extending his eligibility by a season. Of course, that would
> > necessitate Tillman remaining in college for an extra year.
> >
> > "You can do whatever you want with me," Tillman said, "but in four
years
> > I'm gone. I've got things to do with my life."
> >
> > Obviously, he still does.
> >
>
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 2:28:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

> > He's no more a hero than any other soldier over there ..
>
> I'll agree with that statement. However, ya gotta tip the hat to the
> "patriotism" showed. Walking away from the "lifestyle" and all its
> trappings, the money, the celebrity, the adulation of 80,000 people for
> every home game .. the whole experience ..
>
> That's .. that's .. a little different level of patriotism than living in
> the ghetto in Watts and you can sell crack or go in the military.
>
> I hope the NFL does something .. anything .. to honor one of their fallen
> and I hope it is more significant than a moment of silence opening Sunday.
>
> This was truly a special person.

And so say's Archie Bunker.
Perhaps the guy was just a normal person, like thousands of others, who felt
they had to do "something" .
Perhaps fame and wealth are not all they're cracked up to be.
April 24, 2004 2:32:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"John Sterren" <sterren22@gawab.com> wrote in message
news:c6c37p$ack9a$1@ID-227569.news.uni-berlin.de...
> Hero, my ass.
>
> He was just another thoughtless little thug brainwashed into Uncle Sam's
Oil
> Army.
>

He was killed in Afghanistan not Iraq. What oil is there in Afghanistan?
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 5:47:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"Jayhawker" <rock.chalk@jayhawks.net> wrote in message
news:BCAEA75D.1EC57%rock.chalk@jayhawks.net...
> This really shook me. After the story about his death I pasted on one
> written about a year ago about him leaving the NFL. He's a real hero.
>
> Tillman killed in Afghanistan
>
> CNN: Former Cardinals safety was serving in U.S. Army in Afghanistan
> Posted: Friday April 23, 2004 11:36AM; Updated: Friday April 23, 2004
> 11:37AM
>
> WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Former NFL player Pat Tillman was killed Thursday
while
> serving as an Army Special Forces soldier on a mission in southeastern
> Afghanistan, Pentagon officials have told CNN.
>

Hey, thanks for the enlightening post. I had no idea that Tillman was
killed in action: it isn't like it has been all over the news since this
morning.

It would've been nice, however, if you would have enhanced your post by some
kind of audio playback of your cut and paste of the CNN story.

First in News, CSIPGS.

Alanb
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 5:47:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

> First in News, CSIPGS.
>
> Alanb
>
BWHAHAHA. That's awesome. You should add "Fair and Balanced" also.
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 6:50:17 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

>And so say's Archie Bunker.
>Perhaps the guy was just a normal person, like thousands of others, who felt
>they had to do "something" .
>Perhaps fame and wealth are not all they're cracked up to be.

Or...maybe the fame and wealth *are* all they're cracked up to be, but this guy
was just one in a million. Like I said before, you can't say he's more of a
hero, but you do have to admire his patriotism because it is different than
someone who had nothing when they went into the service. This guy was all set
financially, he didn't have to do anything, but he took the time and gave his
life because he cared about other people. Not only that, when he went into the
service he wanted no press coverage or special treatment. How many other
people in his position would have done the same thing? How many have?
April 24, 2004 2:39:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

it shook me too. my son in law is in his unit and he told me that
rangers don't get ambushed....they do the ambushing. so sorta
worrisome. they throw around terms like warrior, hero and role
model to these professional athletes way to easily......pretty easy
to see who the real heros are. and talk about bad timing for
eli crybaby manning. he comes off looking like a spoiled little
brat in comparison.


"Jayhawker" <rock.chalk@jayhawks.net> wrote in message
news:BCAEA75D.1EC57%rock.chalk@jayhawks.net...
> This really shook me. After the story about his death I pasted on one
> written about a year ago about him leaving the NFL. He's a real hero.
>
> Tillman killed in Afghanistan
>
> CNN: Former Cardinals safety was serving in U.S. Army in Afghanistan
> Posted: Friday April 23, 2004 11:36AM; Updated: Friday April 23, 2004
> 11:37AM
>
> WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Former NFL player Pat Tillman was killed Thursday
while
> serving as an Army Special Forces soldier on a mission in southeastern
> Afghanistan, Pentagon officials have told CNN.
>
> Tillman, who walked away from a $3.6 million contract as a safety with
the
> Arizona Cardinals to join the military after the Sept. 11 attacks, was in
an
> area where numerous U.S. troops have been killed in battles with suspected
> al Qaeda and Taliban fighters.
>
> He was serving as an Army Ranger, part of the Army's Special Forces.The
> officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said a formal
> announcement was expected later in the day.
>
> Spokesmen at the Pentagon and U.S. Army declined comment.
>
> There were no immediate details on his death.
>
> A military official, also speaking on the condition of anonymity, said
that
> a soldier had been killed in action in Afghanistan on Thursday, but could
> not confirm that the soldier was Tillman.
>
> Tillman played four seasons with the Cardinals before enlisting in the
Army
> in May 2002.
>
> His brother, Kevin, a former minor league baseball prospect in the
> Cleveland Indians' organization, also joined the Rangers and served in the
> Middle East.
>
> More details are forthcoming.
>
> Tillman follows beat of a different drum
>
> By Tom Barnidge
> NFL Insider
>
> (March 20, 2003) -- Those who know Pat Tillman know that he always has
> welcomed a challenge.
>
> As a youth, he high-dived from bridges and cliffs. At Arizona State, he
> hopped the fence at Sun Devil Stadium and climbed a light tower. Before
> reporting for training camp with the Arizona Cardinals two years ago, he
> competed in a 70-mile triathlon.
>
> "He's like Forrest Gump. He tries everything," says Frank Sanders, his
> former teammate.
>
> So no one should have been surprised last spring when Tillman, entering
his
> fourth NFL season, shucked it all and joined his brother, Kevin, in
setting
> out to become an Army Ranger. What's a three-year, $3.6 million pro
football
> contract when you can collect $18,000 a year from Uncle Sam?
>
> "Pat has very deep and true convictions," Cardinals coach Dave McGinnis
> said at the time. "He's a deep thinker, and believe me, this was something
> he thought out."
>
> Tillman made no public statement. He wasn't in this for the publicity.
But
> you didn't need to dig too deeply to find an explanation for his actions.
> Friends said that the 9/11 terrorist attacks had affected him deeply.
> Cardinals defensive coordinator Larry Marmie, after a conversation with
his
> former player, said Tillman felt he needed to "pay something back" for the
> comfortable life he had been afforded.
>
> Whatever his rationale, he clearly was serious about his pursuit. He and
> Kevin completed basic training in July and advanced through individual
> training in October. They graduated from parachute school in November, and
> completed the Ranger Indoctrination Program in December. Just that
quickly,
> Tillman was assigned to the second battalion of the 75th Ranger Regiment
in
> Fort Lewis, Washington.
>
> "He's a full-fledged Ranger now," Army spokesperson Carol Darby reported.
> "He's ready for combat. He will move with his unit for whatever that unit
is
> involved in."
>
> The 75th Ranger Regiment was deployed recently, presumably to the Middle
> East. If the description that the Army attaches to the unit ("flexible,
> highly trained, and rapidly deployed light infantry force with specialized
> skills") is any measure, the 75th likely will wind up in the middle of the
> most serious action.
>
> You can be sure that Tillman will be prepared for the challenge. He
> succeeds at just about everything he sets out to do.
>
> ConsiderS
>
> He arrived at Arizona State in 1994 on the school's last remaining
football
> scholarship, landing a spot on the end of the bench, where dreams go to
> expire. He left four seasons later as the Pac-10 Conference Defensive
Player
> of the Year.
>
> He was selected by the Cardinals with the 226th pick of the 1998 draft --
> the league packed up and went home after pick 241 -- and five months
later,
> he was Arizona's starting strong safety.
>
> This is a fellow who doesn't know the meaning of fail -- on the field, in
> the classroom, or anywhere else. He had a 3.84 grade-point average at ASU
> and graduated with a degree in marketing in 3? years.
>
> Pat Tillman is nothing if not unusual. In college, he played linebacker,
> where he was thought to be too small. In the NFL, he played safety, where
he
> was thought to be too slow. When he set a club record for tackles in 2000
> and attracted the interest of another team, the St. Louis Rams, he
declined
> their five-year offer sheet out of loyalty to the club that had drafted
him.
>
> NFL players hardly have been strangers to military service. Roger
Staubach
> served four years after graduating from the Naval Academy before joining
the
> Dallas Cowboys as a 27-year-old rookie in 1969. Rocky Bleier of the
> Pittsburgh Steelers nearly lost a leg to a land mine when he did a tour of
> duty in Vietnam.
>
> But the list of names grows a little shorter when it comes to NFL players
> who have walked away from million-dollar contracts in the prime of their
> careers.
>
> The story that comes to mind is one told by Bruce Snyder, Tillman's coach
> at Arizona State. It seems that Snyder planned to redshirt Tillman as a
> freshman, extending his eligibility by a season. Of course, that would
> necessitate Tillman remaining in college for an extra year.
>
> "You can do whatever you want with me," Tillman said, "but in four years
> I'm gone. I've got things to do with my life."
>
> Obviously, he still does.
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 7:39:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"Jayhawker" <rock.chalk@jayhawks.net> wrote in message
news:BCAEA75D.1EC57%rock.chalk@jayhawks.net...
> This really shook me. After the story about his death I pasted on one
> written about a year ago about him leaving the NFL. He's a real hero.
>
> Tillman killed in Afghanistan
>
> Tillman, who walked away from a $3.6 million contract as a safety with
the
> Arizona Cardinals to join the military after the Sept. 11 attacks, was in
an
> area where numerous U.S. troops have been killed in battles with suspected
> al Qaeda and Taliban fighters.
>
> He was serving as an Army Ranger, part of the Army's Special Forces.The
> officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said a formal
> announcement was expected later in the day.
>

No doubt Tillman was a great man. But it's funny how somehow, in death, a
person becomes infinitely greater than might have been the case.

And anyhow, let's not forget all the others who have also died in war and
elsewhere, unjustly. They also are great people; and let's not forget:
death is the great equalizer.

Alanb
Anonymous
April 25, 2004 12:28:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"Phil" <phylville@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:422fec7e.0404241604.7041af10@posting.google.com...
> "John Sterren" <sterren22@gawab.com> wrote in message
news:<c6c37p$ack9a$1@ID-227569.news.uni-berlin.de>...
> > Hero, my ass.
> >


> > He was just another thoughtless little thug brainwashed into Uncle Sam's
Oil> And for satisfactions sake ..... I hope you're over there when they
> nuke it.

He will not be there, he is a coward!
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 2:50:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 22:28:31 +0100, "redTed" <redted@nthellworld.com>
wrote:

>And so say's Archie Bunker.
>Perhaps the guy was just a normal person, like thousands of others, who felt
>they had to do "something" .
>Perhaps fame and wealth are not all they're cracked up to be.
>
Could any of you please explain why american soldiers dying in Iraq
are patriots and/or heroes ?
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 2:50:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"S. Delerme" <delerme@free.fr> wrote in message
news:t938909ejhdsl42b3irncluq6qntfcl9ns@4ax.com...

> Could any of you please explain why american soldiers dying in Iraq
> are patriots and/or heroes ?

You forgot to capitalize American.
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 1:20:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

On Sat, 1 May 2004 16:09:05 -0500, "Pumbaa" <maniac@large> wrote:

>
>"S. Delerme" <delerme@free.fr> wrote in message
>news:t938909ejhdsl42b3irncluq6qntfcl9ns@4ax.com...
>
>> Could any of you please explain why american soldiers dying in Iraq
>> are patriots and/or heroes ?
>
>You forgot to capitalize American.
>
I thought you capitalized names, not adjectives (but maybe English is
different in that respect)
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 2:03:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"S. Delerme" <delerme@free.fr> wrote in message
news:p 78990hsvmhjigeq1st9hpv21krai4v9i3@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 1 May 2004 16:09:05 -0500, "Pumbaa" <maniac@large> wrote:
>
> >
> >"S. Delerme" <delerme@free.fr> wrote in message
> >news:t938909ejhdsl42b3irncluq6qntfcl9ns@4ax.com...
> >
> >> Could any of you please explain why american soldiers dying in Iraq
> >> are patriots and/or heroes ?
> >
> >You forgot to capitalize American.
> >
> I thought you capitalized names, not adjectives (but maybe English is
> different in that respect)

American, French, Ecuadorian and any adjective that is a derivative of a
proper noun is capitalized in English. It seemed to me that you
deliberately put it in lower case to point out your negative stereotyping of
the American mindset.

When in France, I visited the Arch de Triomphe. Seems there was a tomb of
an unknown soldier there. Plenty of Napoleon around town too. I also went
up to see Omaha Beach. Did you ever question why these soldiers would be
considered heroes?

While celebration of war (and those who fight in them) is perplexing, it
certainly isn't an uniquely American phenomenon.
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 6:17:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

Just another point that flew quickly above your head Delerme, Just stay home
!!
!