Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Cricket 2004- impressions from American

Last response: in Video Games
Share
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 5:36:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

I got this game out of pure curiosity about a week ago (and you have to
special order it from the web, nobody sells it in the US in retail). I
lived in England for 3 1/2 years in the late 80's as a young teenager as a
military dependent- that's the technical term (I left at around 15-16 or so,
I cannot remember- it was a mix between "cool" and "culture shock", and at
any rate, has left a lasting impression on me- returning to the US to
northern Virginia was a bit of a culture shock too afterwards). I don't
remember seeing much cricket over there, either, although there was alot of
"football" (and I got into playing that Subbuteo thing and soccer games on
the Amiga, but never understood how people could watch the game on the TV
with the ball just going back and forth- obviously copious quantities of
alcohol help).

So anyways, the cricket game (for PC)... I have little idea how to play
cricket but I'm learning as I go. I knew it had to do with trying to knock
over some sticks (wickets), and a batter guards the sticks with his spatula
shaped bat, and the batter (batsman?) runs between two wickets and gets
runs. And a bowler sort of runs and throws the ball, lobbing it sort of
like a softball. Other than that, I'm learning as I go. It seems pretty
fun to play the 10 overs- it's about the same length as a baseball game,
give or take some time. Like baseball it apparrently has a huge list of
rules and technical terms (LBW- I didn't know what this meant at first, but
later learned it's the batsman blocking the wicket with his leg
intentionally, and it produces an "out"). The batter guy also has alot more
control over the ball than in baseball, and also the "best" hit seems to be
equivalent often to baseball's "bunt"- the batsman has alot more options
than in baseball. And the batter seems to get hit alot more often than in
baseball (which is why they are wearing alot of padding and facemasks, I
guess).

The graphics are OK, very PS2 looking, not really up to other PC games.
The animations are decent, and I guess there is a good selection of teams.
The commentary is not great- too much stutter in the cadence and the
commentator (?) sounds like he's about to fall asleep, though- not up to
FIFA or EA's other games, or even Konami's Winning Eleven (which I thought
had a bit repetitive commentary, but at least it was synched together good).
June 23, 2004 1:47:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 13:36:43 -0400, "magnulus"
<magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote:

> So anyways, the cricket game (for PC)... I have little idea how to play
>cricket but I'm learning as I go. I knew it had to do with trying to knock
>over some sticks (wickets), and a batter guards the sticks with his spatula
>shaped bat,

Spatula shaped?

> and the batter (batsman?)

Batsman is correct.

> runs between two wickets and gets
>runs. And a bowler sort of runs and throws the ball, lobbing it sort of
>like a softball.

Not really like softball as the ball is usually bowled to bounce
somewhere close to the wicket so the batsman hits it on the rise.

> Other than that, I'm learning as I go. It seems pretty
>fun to play the 10 overs- it's about the same length as a baseball game,

10 overs isn't accurate to a real game. English cricket is usually 50
overs (6 balls in an over - the bowlers and fielders change ends each
over) for a one day game. International test games take place over 5
days, with each team getting 2 innings. The team with the highest
score wins, but if the game isn't resolved after 5 days it is a draw.
We have just started a new shorter game style called 20-20 which is 20
overs per side to attract people who haven't got the time to watch the
longer games.

>give or take some time. Like baseball it apparrently has a huge list of
>rules and technical terms (LBW- I didn't know what this meant at first, but
>later learned it's the batsman blocking the wicket with his leg
>intentionally, and it produces an "out").

LBW is simply Leg Before Wicket. Its not called "an out", the batter
is simply out. He will also be out if his wicket is hit and the bails
on top fall off, or if he hits the ball and it is caught before it
hits the ground.

> The batter guy also has alot more
>control over the ball than in baseball, and also the "best" hit seems to be
>equivalent often to baseball's "bunt"- the batsman has alot more options
>than in baseball.

There is no "best" hit AFAIK, it is just called a block I think.

> And the batter seems to get hit alot more often than in
>baseball (which is why they are wearing alot of padding and facemasks, I
>guess).

Due to the ball usually getting bounced before it reaches the wicket,
styles of bowling are quite different to baseball. You have fast
bowlers who run down the field before launching the ball as fast as
possible, spin bowlers who take less run up and make the ball curl in
the air and do odd things when they hit the ground (when you see
fielders and bowlers polishing the ball on their trousers, they are
making one side smooth and keeping the other side rough), and seamers
that get odd bounces from utilising the pronounced seam of the
stitching on the ball.

As the bowler is rotated every over, the batsman have to get used to
different styles of bowling. It is the fast bowlers that usually cause
the most pain, hence the padding.
--
Andrew. To email unscramble nrc@gurjevgrzrboivbhf.pbz & remove spamtrap.
Help make Usenet a better place: English is read downwards,
please don't top post. Trim messages to quote only relevant text.
Check groups.google.com before asking a question.
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 1:47:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

"Andrew" <spamtrap@localhost> wrote in message
news:tifid0hf4onuhj0s7jia4sp35ijioh52j8@4ax.com...
> Not really like softball as the ball is usually bowled to bounce
> somewhere close to the wicket so the batsman hits it on the rise.
>

Yes, but the ball can be lobbed sort of like softball (underhanded throw,
which is how alot of casual softball works). Not really correct but to an
American the term "bowling" wouldn't be too accurate to describe the motion.

> 10 overs isn't accurate to a real game. English cricket is usually 50
> overs (6 balls in an over - the bowlers and fielders change ends each
> over) for a one day game.

No kidding. But 5 minute halves aren't exactly realistic in FIFA 2004,
either, yet people do play the videogames that way.

I'd imagine 50 overs would be a VERY long game by American standards. I
usually cannot watch a full length American football game without falling
asleep (it lasts about 3 hours, with only about 1 hour of real play time).
I'd imagine "one day cricket" would be the same way, not to mention the
"test" matches. It makes baseball look like a very short game, in contrast.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
June 23, 2004 2:34:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 05:09:27 -0400, "magnulus"
<magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote:

> Yes, but the ball can be lobbed sort of like softball (underhanded throw,
>which is how alot of casual softball works). Not really correct but to an
>American the term "bowling" wouldn't be too accurate to describe the motion.

Technically I think you can bowl it under arm in cricket (which small
kids might do), but all the bowling you will see in a proper game is
over arm with the arm swinging in a circle before letting go of the
ball. It isn't like the pitching of baseball. I don't know how the
speed of the ball compares to baseball, but I know it hurts when you
get hit by the ball :-)
--
Andrew. To email unscramble nrc@gurjevgrzrboivbhf.pbz & remove spamtrap.
Help make Usenet a better place: English is read downwards,
please don't top post. Trim messages to quote only relevant text.
Check groups.google.com before asking a question.
July 19, 2004 7:10:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.sports (More info?)

If I remember throwing that cricket ball involved a small skip just before
you release the ball over your head...kinda like serving a tennis ball.

That cricket ball is a lot harder than a baseball...if I remember correctly.

....use to play this when I lived in South Africa...now I'm in Texas....

Redbrick...who Loves his CLK


In article <hbjid0lq9be63sdtqorsg0s8o43der4g7f@4ax.com>, spamtrap@localhost
says...
>
>On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 05:09:27 -0400, "magnulus"
><magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote:
>
>> Yes, but the ball can be lobbed sort of like softball (underhanded throw,
>>which is how alot of casual softball works). Not really correct but to an
>>American the term "bowling" wouldn't be too accurate to describe the motion.
>
>Technically I think you can bowl it under arm in cricket (which small
>kids might do), but all the bowling you will see in a proper game is
>over arm with the arm swinging in a circle before letting go of the
>ball. It isn't like the pitching of baseball. I don't know how the
>speed of the ball compares to baseball, but I know it hurts when you
>get hit by the ball :-)
>--
>Andrew. To email unscramble nrc@gurjevgrzrboivbhf.pbz & remove spamtrap.
>Help make Usenet a better place: English is read downwards,
>please don't top post. Trim messages to quote only relevant text.
>Check groups.google.com before asking a question.
!