Sound-reducing glass advice please.

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I have a few interior windows of the old, double-hung type. They
transmit a lot of sound from the outside into a home studio and living
room. In short, the dog next door and slamming car doors are intrusive.

Instead of installing expensive double-glazed storm windows, I thought
I'd try to attach some glass over the window from the inside. I never
open these windows, so no problem there. Perhaps just a piece of glass I
could lay over the window and affix with mirror-type fittings.

I'd appreciate any information about the best glass for reducing sound,
or any other material that might even do a better job. Websites articles
or any recommendations welcome.

(to the list, please)

RG
10 answers Last reply
More about sound reducing glass advice please
  1. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Richard Gecko" <geck@nomac.com> wrote in message
    news:geck-573AAB.18230714022005@newssvr11-ext.news.prodigy.com...
    >I have a few interior windows of the old, double-hung type. They
    > transmit a lot of sound from the outside into a home studio and living
    > room. In short, the dog next door and slamming car doors are intrusive.
    >
    > Instead of installing expensive double-glazed storm windows, I thought
    > I'd try to attach some glass over the window from the inside. I never
    > open these windows, so no problem there. Perhaps just a piece of glass I
    > could lay over the window and affix with mirror-type fittings.
    >
    > I'd appreciate any information about the best glass for reducing sound,
    > or any other material that might even do a better job. Websites articles
    > or any recommendations welcome.
    >
    > (to the list, please)
    >
    > RG

    You will have little success with the approach you suggest.
    Multiple-layered pane windows reduce sound transmission by trapping air
    between the panes. That means that one needs an air-tight seal, when
    glazing in the second or additional panes. In addition, old double hung
    sash windows are typically very leaky around the frame. So, even if you do
    glaze the new glass in a fashion to achieve an air-tight seal, a significant
    amount of sound will leak around the edges of the frame. With all of that
    said, you may be able to achieve ... some ... noise transmission reduction
    if you install an additional glass pane. And, a standard thickness pane as
    large as a double hung window will be pretty useless. You'll have to go
    thicker... 1/4 inch at least. You must approach it as you would install a
    weather proof window. That means well caulked trim strips all around on
    both sides of the glass, closed-cell foam weather stripping on each side of
    the glass all around, and solid rubber spacers for the glass to rest on to
    keep the glass from touching the frame. Unfortunately, you will not know
    ahead of time how successful this project will be until you do it.

    I had a similar yet easier problem to solve with my basement studio. There
    are two metal framed casement windows in the poured concrete foundation very
    close to my recording position. I removed the casement windows entirely. I
    added a wood frame within the metal frame caulking those framing pieces
    thoroughly. Within that new frame I installed a double pane system
    consisting of one piece of 1/4 inch glass and another pane of 3/8 inch
    Lexan. Both pieces are floated on solid rubber spacers and encased around
    the edges in closed cell foam weather stripping. As soon as I did this, my
    neighbors dogs, aircraft, and the other usual suburban noise went away. As
    long as no one mows my back yard, while I am recording, I'm good to go.
    Since I mow my own yard, even that's not a problem.

    Another thought, unfortunately not a very encouraging one... if your house
    does not have really substantial construction with fairly dense insulation
    within the exterior walls, a lot of the exterior noise you hear will come
    right through the walls negating the energy and expense you put into the
    windows. Hate to be so negative.

    Good luck. Let us know how it turns out.

    Steve King
  2. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Steve King <steve@45steveking57.net> wrote:
    > "Richard Gecko" <geck@nomac.com> wrote in message
    > news:geck-573AAB.18230714022005@newssvr11-ext.news.prodigy.com...
    >>I have a few interior windows of the old, double-hung type. They
    >> transmit a lot of sound from the outside into a home studio and living
    >> room. In short, the dog next door and slamming car doors are intrusive.
    >>
    >> Instead of installing expensive double-glazed storm windows, I thought
    >> I'd try to attach some glass over the window from the inside. I never
    >> open these windows, so no problem there. Perhaps just a piece of glass I
    >> could lay over the window and affix with mirror-type fittings.
    >>
    >> I'd appreciate any information about the best glass for reducing sound,
    >> or any other material that might even do a better job. Websites articles
    >> or any recommendations welcome.
    >>
    >> (to the list, please)
    >>
    >> RG

    > You will have little success with the approach you suggest.
    > Multiple-layered pane windows reduce sound transmission by trapping air
    > between the panes. That means that one needs an air-tight seal, when
    > glazing in the second or additional panes. In addition, old double hung
    > sash windows are typically very leaky around the frame. So, even if you do
    > glaze the new glass in a fashion to achieve an air-tight seal, a significant
    > amount of sound will leak around the edges of the frame. With all of that
    > said, you may be able to achieve ... some ... noise transmission reduction
    > if you install an additional glass pane. And, a standard thickness pane as
    > large as a double hung window will be pretty useless. You'll have to go
    > thicker... 1/4 inch at least. You must approach it as you would install a
    > weather proof window. That means well caulked trim strips all around on
    > both sides of the glass, closed-cell foam weather stripping on each side of
    > the glass all around, and solid rubber spacers for the glass to rest on to
    > keep the glass from touching the frame. Unfortunately, you will not know
    > ahead of time how successful this project will be until you do it.

    > I had a similar yet easier problem to solve with my basement studio. There
    > are two metal framed casement windows in the poured concrete foundation very
    > close to my recording position. I removed the casement windows entirely. I
    > added a wood frame within the metal frame caulking those framing pieces
    > thoroughly. Within that new frame I installed a double pane system
    > consisting of one piece of 1/4 inch glass and another pane of 3/8 inch
    > Lexan. Both pieces are floated on solid rubber spacers and encased around
    > the edges in closed cell foam weather stripping. As soon as I did this, my
    > neighbors dogs, aircraft, and the other usual suburban noise went away. As
    > long as no one mows my back yard, while I am recording, I'm good to go.
    > Since I mow my own yard, even that's not a problem.

    > Another thought, unfortunately not a very encouraging one... if your house
    > does not have really substantial construction with fairly dense insulation
    > within the exterior walls, a lot of the exterior noise you hear will come
    > right through the walls negating the energy and expense you put into the
    > windows. Hate to be so negative.

    > Good luck. Let us know how it turns out.

    What if he were to install 1/4 inch Lexan over the frames, sealed airtight,
    on a gasket? Then he gets some mass, plus some bonus security.

    Rob R.
  3. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
    news:cutm03$164$2@news1.chem.utoronto.ca...
    > Steve King <steve@45steveking57.net> wrote:
    >> "Richard Gecko" <geck@nomac.com> wrote in message
    >> news:geck-573AAB.18230714022005@newssvr11-ext.news.prodigy.com...
    >>>I have a few interior windows of the old, double-hung type. They
    >>> transmit a lot of sound from the outside into a home studio and living
    >>> room. In short, the dog next door and slamming car doors are intrusive.
    >>>
    SNIP
    > What if he were to install 1/4 inch Lexan over the frames, sealed
    > airtight,
    > on a gasket? Then he gets some mass, plus some bonus security.
    >
    > Rob R.

    On the inside? Around the whole frame gasketed to the wall? I doubt it.
    The glass or plastic pane has to be mechanically insulated from everything
    else. That means a new frame gasketed to the wall with the little rubber
    spacers to provide support and mechanical isolation. Might help, but not
    knowing the wall construction impossible to know whether the result would be
    worth the expense and the amazement of the wife, when she sees the
    innovative new architectural features in her living room.

    Steve King
  4. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Steve King" <steve@45steveking57.net> wrote in message
    news:D9udnc7sobwNC4_fRVn-qg@comcast.com...
    > "Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
    > news:cutm03$164$2@news1.chem.utoronto.ca...
    > > Steve King <steve@45steveking57.net> wrote:
    > >> "Richard Gecko" <geck@nomac.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:geck-573AAB.18230714022005@newssvr11-ext.news.prodigy.com...
    > >>>I have a few interior windows of the old, double-hung type. They
    > >>> transmit a lot of sound from the outside into a home studio and living
    > >>> room. In short, the dog next door and slamming car doors are
    intrusive.
    > >>>
    > SNIP
    > > What if he were to install 1/4 inch Lexan over the frames, sealed
    > > airtight,
    > > on a gasket? Then he gets some mass, plus some bonus security.
    > >
    > > Rob R.
    >
    > On the inside? Around the whole frame gasketed to the wall? I doubt it.
    > The glass or plastic pane has to be mechanically insulated from everything
    > else. That means a new frame gasketed to the wall with the little rubber
    > spacers to provide support and mechanical isolation. Might help, but not
    > knowing the wall construction impossible to know whether the result would
    be
    > worth the expense and the amazement of the wife, when she sees the
    > innovative new architectural features in her living room.
    >
    > Steve King
    >
    >

    The only glass with "sound reducing" qualities of any significance is
    laminated glass. Not too expensive, but correct installation is key to the
    result. Consult an acoustician.

    If it 'rings' when you tap it; it's an amplifier @ that frequency.

    jepp
  5. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Richard Gecko wrote:
    > I have a few interior windows of the old, double-hung type. They
    > transmit a lot of sound from the outside into a home studio and living
    > room. In short, the dog next door and slamming car doors are intrusive.
    >
    > Instead of installing expensive double-glazed storm windows, I thought
    > I'd try to attach some glass over the window from the inside. I never
    > open these windows, so no problem there. Perhaps just a piece of glass I
    > could lay over the window and affix with mirror-type fittings.
    >
    > I'd appreciate any information about the best glass for reducing sound,
    > or any other material that might even do a better job. Websites articles
    > or any recommendations welcome.
    >
    > (to the list, please)
    >
    > RG

    I have no neighbors close enough to worry about, but I currently have a
    problem with the singing of birds - it's truly amazing how loud they can
    be. I plan to install fairly heavy wooden shutters which I will close
    when necessary. But then it's a large barn-like space with plenty of
    room. Something similar in your house might be too intrusive. But it's
    worth considering the idea that you needn't use glass - unless you must
    look outside during recording (I can't think why that would be).

    -Naren
  6. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >Richard Gecko wrote:
    >
    >I have no neighbors close enough to worry about, but I currently have a
    >problem with the singing of birds - it's truly amazing how loud they can
    >be. I plan to install fairly heavy wooden shutters which I will close
    >when necessary. But then it's a large barn-like space with plenty of
    >room. Something similar in your house might be too intrusive. But it's
    >worth considering the idea that you needn't use glass - unless you must
    >look outside during recording (I can't think why that would be).

    Birds are mostly high frequency stuff, which helps. Two panes of half-inch
    glass with an airspace between them ought to give you more than enough mass
    to deal with that stuff.

    The alternative is to get a lot of really big cats in the yard.
    --scott


    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  7. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
    news:cv4rsk$gjp$1@panix2.panix.com...
    > >Richard Gecko wrote:
    >>
    >>I have no neighbors close enough to worry about, but I currently have a
    >>problem with the singing of birds - it's truly amazing how loud they can
    >>be. I plan to install fairly heavy wooden shutters which I will close
    >>when necessary. But then it's a large barn-like space with plenty of
    >>room. Something similar in your house might be too intrusive. But it's
    >>worth considering the idea that you needn't use glass - unless you must
    >>look outside during recording (I can't think why that would be).
    >
    > Birds are mostly high frequency stuff, which helps. Two panes of
    > half-inch
    > glass with an airspace between them ought to give you more than enough
    > mass
    > to deal with that stuff.
    >
    > The alternative is to get a lot of really big cats in the yard.
    > --scott
    >
    And the cats are way cheaper.

    Steve King
  8. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Scott Dorsey <kludge@panix.com> wrote:

    > The alternative is to get a lot of really big cats in the yard.

    Yes but then the cats make noise, and then you need to get really big dogs.

    And then the dogs make noise and you need to get...

    Rob R.
  9. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Rob Reedijk <wrote:

    > Scott Dorsey wrote:

    > > The alternative is to get a lot of really big cats in the yard.

    > Yes but then the cats make noise, and then you need to get really big dogs.

    > And then the dogs make noise and you need to get...

    So the effective alternative is to decorate your yard with those big
    plastic owls.

    --
    ha
  10. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
    news:1gs6mxe.kdi7acxn03j0N%walkinay@thegrid.net...
    > Rob Reedijk <wrote:
    >
    >> Scott Dorsey wrote:
    >
    >> > The alternative is to get a lot of really big cats in the yard.
    >
    >> Yes but then the cats make noise, and then you need to get really big
    >> dogs.
    >
    >> And then the dogs make noise and you need to get...
    >
    > So the effective alternative is to decorate your yard with those big
    > plastic owls.
    >

    I had no idea acoustic engineering was so complicated.

    Steve King
Ask a new question

Read More

Pro Audio Audio