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Why doesn't somebody make a digital recorder like this?

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Anonymous
February 15, 2005 2:33:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I use a DAW at home, but taking it out to do location recording is a
PITA. At the same time I really wish the DAW had more analog inputs...I
only have 8 to 10 available at once. I plan to get a MOTU 24 i/o at
some point but again that is a mess of stuff to take out live.

Notebooks can be used these days for live recording....but unless you
bring along your interface, and all the ADAT/TFIF adaptor things, you
are again limited to about 8 - 12 tracks. All the portable interfaces I
see say "24 tracks" but they only have 8 analog inputs/outputs...if you
want more you need to hook up ADAT or TDIF boxes...suddenly you have a
notebook, it's audio interface, one or two other hardware boxes and all
the cabling and problems that go with a four piece solution.

The hardware digital recorders on the other hand are fairly small and
compact, and it's all in one box...converters, disk drives, meters,
etc. But the way they integrate with the computer seems pretty klugey.
The one thing nice about them is they are priced at about or below what
24 channels of analog I/O costs...but integration with the DAW is not
as good as a dedicated firewire/PCI interface

What would be cool is if they made a hardware digital recorder that
could be used as a standalone recorder like they are now...OR in your
studio you hook it up to your DAW via firewire and it acts just like a
regular audio interface...bypassing the internal disk drives but still
letting you use the metering.

I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?

Also the FST format of the Alesis needs to be converted to wav, right?

Maybe I am looking at too narrow of a market niche, but at the prices
they go for, a 24 track digital hardware recorder that could double as
an audio interface for a computer would be really cool...

Analogeezer

More about : make digital recorder

Anonymous
February 15, 2005 2:39:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1108496007.551802.107970@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
analogeezer@aerosolkings.com wrote:

> I use a DAW at home, but taking it out to do location recording is a
> PITA. At the same time I really wish the DAW had more analog inputs...I
> only have 8 to 10 available at once. I plan to get a MOTU 24 i/o at
> some point but again that is a mess of stuff to take out live.
>
> Notebooks can be used these days for live recording....but unless you
> bring along your interface, and all the ADAT/TFIF adaptor things, you
> are again limited to about 8 - 12 tracks. All the portable interfaces I
> see say "24 tracks" but they only have 8 analog inputs/outputs...if you
> want more you need to hook up ADAT or TDIF boxes...suddenly you have a
> notebook, it's audio interface, one or two other hardware boxes and all
> the cabling and problems that go with a four piece solution.
>
> The hardware digital recorders on the other hand are fairly small and
> compact, and it's all in one box...converters, disk drives, meters,
> etc. But the way they integrate with the computer seems pretty klugey.
> The one thing nice about them is they are priced at about or below what
> 24 channels of analog I/O costs...but integration with the DAW is not
> as good as a dedicated firewire/PCI interface
>
> What would be cool is if they made a hardware digital recorder that
> could be used as a standalone recorder like they are now...OR in your
> studio you hook it up to your DAW via firewire and it acts just like a
> regular audio interface...bypassing the internal disk drives but still
> letting you use the metering.
>
> I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
> transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
> into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
> Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?
>
> Also the FST format of the Alesis needs to be converted to wav, right?
>
> Maybe I am looking at too narrow of a market niche, but at the prices
> they go for, a 24 track digital hardware recorder that could double as
> an audio interface for a computer would be really cool...
>
> Analogeezer
>


How about multiple FireWire boxes like the MOTU 828mkII or the new Traveler?
Those and a laptop (a fast, powerful, expensive one...) would get you there.
Not cheaply, but without too much mess.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 3:26:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I do have a rackmount computer, but it's quite deep,. That plus you get
no metering with many of the audio interfaces on the market (the MOTU
stuff is an exception).

I'm thinking about how I can get an HD-24 for about what a MOTU 24 i/o
costs, and use it as a standalone so I wouldn't have to drag out a
computer.

I just think if Alesis/Tascam/Fostex/Mackie came out with a new
recorder that acted as in interface too it might extend the lifespan of
said products.

Analogeezer
Related resources
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 4:30:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I think the Yamaha AW2816 and its ilk could do that with the mLAN option
board. Of course, the option board alone is $500 which seems like quite a
rip-off to me when a Firewire port for a PC costs under $50.

On 15 Feb 2005 11:33:27 -0800, analogeezer@aerosolkings.com wrote:

>I use a DAW at home, but taking it out to do location recording is a
>PITA. At the same time I really wish the DAW had more analog inputs...I
>only have 8 to 10 available at once. I plan to get a MOTU 24 i/o at
>some point but again that is a mess of stuff to take out live.
>
>Notebooks can be used these days for live recording....but unless you
>bring along your interface, and all the ADAT/TFIF adaptor things, you
>are again limited to about 8 - 12 tracks. All the portable interfaces I
>see say "24 tracks" but they only have 8 analog inputs/outputs...if you
>want more you need to hook up ADAT or TDIF boxes...suddenly you have a
>notebook, it's audio interface, one or two other hardware boxes and all
>the cabling and problems that go with a four piece solution.
>
>The hardware digital recorders on the other hand are fairly small and
>compact, and it's all in one box...converters, disk drives, meters,
>etc. But the way they integrate with the computer seems pretty klugey.
>The one thing nice about them is they are priced at about or below what
>24 channels of analog I/O costs...but integration with the DAW is not
>as good as a dedicated firewire/PCI interface
>
>What would be cool is if they made a hardware digital recorder that
>could be used as a standalone recorder like they are now...OR in your
>studio you hook it up to your DAW via firewire and it acts just like a
>regular audio interface...bypassing the internal disk drives but still
>letting you use the metering.
>
>I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
>transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
>into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
>Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?
>
>Also the FST format of the Alesis needs to be converted to wav, right?
>
>Maybe I am looking at too narrow of a market niche, but at the prices
>they go for, a 24 track digital hardware recorder that could double as
>an audio interface for a computer would be really cool...
>
>Analogeezer
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 4:47:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 11:39:47 -0800, Jay Kadis <jay@ccrma.stanford.edu>
wrote:

>In article <1108496007.551802.107970@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> analogeezer@aerosolkings.com wrote:
>
>> I use a DAW at home, but taking it out to do location recording is a
>> PITA.

Yeah, but no worse than hauling around reel-to-reels like people used
to do. Why not mount your DAW and your i/o interface in a nice
portable rack with wheels? There are computer cases that can be rack
mounted. Then you could just carry that around (with your monitor of
course). I agree though, some type of portable product like you
describe would be very cool.

Al

At the same time I really wish the DAW had more analog inputs...I
>> only have 8 to 10 available at once. I plan to get a MOTU 24 i/o at
>> some point but again that is a mess of stuff to take out live.
>>
>> Notebooks can be used these days for live recording....but unless you
>> bring along your interface, and all the ADAT/TFIF adaptor things, you
>> are again limited to about 8 - 12 tracks. All the portable interfaces I
>> see say "24 tracks" but they only have 8 analog inputs/outputs...if you
>> want more you need to hook up ADAT or TDIF boxes...suddenly you have a
>> notebook, it's audio interface, one or two other hardware boxes and all
>> the cabling and problems that go with a four piece solution.
>>
>> The hardware digital recorders on the other hand are fairly small and
>> compact, and it's all in one box...converters, disk drives, meters,
>> etc. But the way they integrate with the computer seems pretty klugey.
>> The one thing nice about them is they are priced at about or below what
>> 24 channels of analog I/O costs...but integration with the DAW is not
>> as good as a dedicated firewire/PCI interface
>>
>> What would be cool is if they made a hardware digital recorder that
>> could be used as a standalone recorder like they are now...OR in your
>> studio you hook it up to your DAW via firewire and it acts just like a
>> regular audio interface...bypassing the internal disk drives but still
>> letting you use the metering.
>>
>> I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
>> transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
>> into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
>> Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?
>>
>> Also the FST format of the Alesis needs to be converted to wav, right?
>>
>> Maybe I am looking at too narrow of a market niche, but at the prices
>> they go for, a 24 track digital hardware recorder that could double as
>> an audio interface for a computer would be really cool...
>>
>> Analogeezer
>>
>
>
>How about multiple FireWire boxes like the MOTU 828mkII or the new Traveler?
>Those and a laptop (a fast, powerful, expensive one...) would get you there.
>Not cheaply, but without too much mess.
>
>-Jay
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 5:03:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

get a mac laptop and check out metric halo IO 2882 or ULN2
firewire interface and better quality then almost anything else

< http://mhlabs.com/metric_halo/products/mio/ >

dale
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 10:04:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1108496007.551802.107970@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> analogeezer@aerosolkings.com writes:

> The hardware digital recorders on the other hand are fairly small and
> compact, and it's all in one box...converters, disk drives, meters,
> etc. But the way they integrate with the computer seems pretty klugey.

That's because they aren't supposed to operate with computers. They're
recorders. My Ampex MM1100 didn't operate with a computer, why should
my hard disk recorder?

However, if I want to, I can import files recorded on the recorder's
hard drive to a computer and use whatever DAW software I want.

> The one thing nice about them is they are priced at about or below what
> 24 channels of analog I/O costs...but integration with the DAW is not
> as good as a dedicated firewire/PCI interface

That's because the only thing they have in common with a DAW is the
files they store.

> What would be cool is if they made a hardware digital recorder that
> could be used as a standalone recorder like they are now...OR in your
> studio you hook it up to your DAW via firewire and it acts just like a
> regular audio interface...bypassing the internal disk drives but still
> letting you use the metering.

> I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
> transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
> into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
> Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?

Since both the analog and digital (Lightpipe) outputs are active all
the time, I'll bet you can put a signal into an analog input, watch
the meters, and get a digital output from the optical outputs. All
you'd need is a 24-channel lightpipe card (rather than Firewire) for
your computer and you'd have what you're looking for. RME makes such a
card.

> Maybe I am looking at too narrow of a market niche

You are.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 10:33:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

metric halo also has spectrafoo which is excellent software tools for
monitoring you audio,
both analogue and digital

dale
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 11:05:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

analogeezer@aerosolkings.com wrote:

> I use a DAW at home, but taking it out to do location recording is a
> PITA. At the same time I really wish the DAW had more analog inputs...I
> only have 8 to 10 available at once. I plan to get a MOTU 24 i/o at
> some point but again that is a mess of stuff to take out live.
>
> Notebooks can be used these days for live recording....but unless you
> bring along your interface, and all the ADAT/TFIF adaptor things, you
> are again limited to about 8 - 12 tracks. All the portable interfaces I
> see say "24 tracks" but they only have 8 analog inputs/outputs...if you
> want more you need to hook up ADAT or TDIF boxes...suddenly you have a
> notebook, it's audio interface, one or two other hardware boxes and all
> the cabling and problems that go with a four piece solution.

This is an alternate way of looking at it, but...

What if you put everything in a rack? You can get a rack-mount
computer, or a rack-mount ATX case in which to build your own
(or transfer the guts of a standard one you already have).
And, you can get a rack-mount keyboard/mouse/monitor combo,
or just a rack-mount keyboard/mouse combo and bring a separate
monitor (preferably LCD).

Then you can have everything in one rack (or two racks if weight
or space is a concern), and you don't have to deal with the
annoyances of laptop computers, like stupid power saving features,
lack of hard disk expandability, etc., etc.

- Logan
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 11:25:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<analogeezer@aerosolkings.com> wrote in message
news:1108496007.551802.107970@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
> transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
> into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
> Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?

I think you can if you connect its ADAT outputs to a DAW that has a 24-track
ADAT interface. Or am I mixed up?

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 11:40:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1108501457k@trad...
>
> In article <1108496007.551802.107970@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>
> analogeezer@aerosolkings.com writes:
>
>
>> I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
>> transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
>> into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
>> Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?
>
> Since both the analog and digital (Lightpipe) outputs are active all
> the time, I'll bet you can put a signal into an analog input, watch
> the meters, and get a digital output from the optical outputs. All
> you'd need is a 24-channel lightpipe card (rather than Firewire) for
> your computer and you'd have what you're looking for. RME makes such a
> card.

Yes, you can definitely do this with the Alesis HD24. I don't currently use
mine that way, as I already had 16 channels of A/D/A conversion (Frontier
Designs Tango24) before I bought it. I'm thinking of switching to using the
HD24 for A/D conversion for the DAW because the meters are better than the
ones on the Tango.

Hal Laurent
Baltimore
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 11:53:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1108499201.163027.271280@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com> analogeezer@aerosolkings.com writes:

> I just think if Alesis/Tascam/Fostex/Mackie came out with a new
> recorder that acted as in interface too it might extend the lifespan of
> said products.

I don't think it's in the cards.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 12:59:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:zUsQd.218562$w62.112597@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> <analogeezer@aerosolkings.com> wrote in message
> news:1108496007.551802.107970@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> > I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
> > transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
> > into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
> > Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?
>
> I think you can if you connect its ADAT outputs to a DAW that has a
24-track
> ADAT interface. Or am I mixed up?


The goal is to avoid fragile and messy optical cables and be able to use a
single firewire cable to connect the recorder/interface to the computer.

I'm currently looking for something like that. No luck so far.

Predrag
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 12:59:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <cutns3$h46$1@ls219.htnet.hr> predrag.trpkovNeSpamu@ri.htnet.hr writes:

> The goal is to avoid fragile and messy optical cables and be able to use a
> single firewire cable to connect the recorder/interface to the computer.

Man, some people are just never satisfied. <g>

Me, I don't have a computer with a firewire interface. I like my hard
disk reocorder just the way it is.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 6:19:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jay Kadis> wrote:

> How about multiple FireWire boxes like the MOTU 828mkII or the new Traveler?
> Those and a laptop (a fast, powerful, expensive one...) would get you there.
> Not cheaply, but without too much mess.

Some folks also combine the MIO with something(s) from MOTU or RME, put
them all in a 2-3 space rack and go.

Now, if they only made U47's the size of ECM101's...

--
ha
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 6:19:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> analogeezer writes:

> > I just think if Alesis/Tascam/Fostex/Mackie came out with a new
> > recorder that acted as in interface too it might extend the lifespan of
> > said products.

> I don't think it's in the cards.

Aaaaarrrrggghhhh....


<g>

--
ha
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 2:55:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Recently, analogeezer@aerosolkings.com <analogeezer@aerosolkings.com>
posted:

> I use a DAW at home, but taking it out to do location recording is a
> PITA. At the same time I really wish the DAW had more analog
> inputs...I only have 8 to 10 available at once. I plan to get a MOTU
> 24 i/o at some point but again that is a mess of stuff to take out
> live.
>
> Notebooks can be used these days for live recording....but unless you
> bring along your interface, and all the ADAT/TFIF adaptor things, you
> are again limited to about 8 - 12 tracks. All the portable interfaces
> I see say "24 tracks" but they only have 8 analog inputs/outputs...if
> you want more you need to hook up ADAT or TDIF boxes...suddenly you
> have a notebook, it's audio interface, one or two other hardware
> boxes and all the cabling and problems that go with a four piece
> solution.
>
[...]

If that's what you really want to accomplish, there are other solutions
available. The front end to my computer DAW is a Yamaha AW4416. When going
on a remote, simply substitute the ADAT interface cards with whatever you
require to get up to 24 inputs and record on up to 16 channels in an
all-in-one box that is perfectly integrated. If you need more channels,
buy two AWs and link them via time code. The downside is that you're
limited to no better than 24-bit audio, but I don't see that as a big
problem in most remote environments. When back in the studio, replace the
ADAT cards to transfer the tracks to the computer. If you're industrious,
you could even get some DAW apps to use the AW as a control surface via
its MIDI I/O. Does this meet your needs?

Regards,

--
Neil Gould
--------------------------------------
Terra Tu AV - www.terratu.com
Technical Graphics & Media
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 9:28:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> walkinay@thegrid.net writes:

> > 24 analog channels is 3 rack spaces, and the metering in the MH Console
> > app is really quite good.

> Surely they don't put eight meters horizontal in a one-space rack
> panel.

The Console is software and you can see the metering from a distance
easily, even blind as I am becoming. I think you're tarring something
you haven't brushed. <g>

> And how much visible resolution can you get on a 1" high meter?

Just have to say that I'm not having trouble even with the little meters
on the face of the MIO box, either. I don't know what MH did but
whatever it delivered is _useful_.

> From a few arms lengths, about the only thing my poor old tired eyes
> could resolve is the red light on top. What's the best telescope to
> use to view a small meter?

Something from Edmund Scientific?

--
ha
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 9:56:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
news:1gs2nlh.1ysksq01vhf59fN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> Mike Rivers wrote:
>
>> walkinay@thegrid.net writes:
>
>> > 24 analog channels is 3 rack spaces, and the metering in the MH Console
>> > app is really quite good.
>
>> Surely they don't put eight meters horizontal in a one-space rack
>> panel.
>
> The Console is software and you can see the metering from a distance
> easily, even blind as I am becoming. I think you're tarring something
> you haven't brushed. <g>
>
>> And how much visible resolution can you get on a 1" high meter?
>
> Just have to say that I'm not having trouble even with the little meters
> on the face of the MIO box, either. I don't know what MH did but
> whatever it delivered is _useful_.
>
>> From a few arms lengths, about the only thing my poor old tired eyes
>> could resolve is the red light on top. What's the best telescope to
>> use to view a small meter?
>
> Something from Edmund Scientific?


I just contacted Metric Halo and while they have no release date for a PC
driver now, it does seem like it is on the horizon.
Now I know what I'm waiting for in regards to my portable rig.


--

-Hev
remove your opinion to find me here:
www.michaelYOURspringerOPINION.com
http://www.freeiPods.com/?r=14089013
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 10:22:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Steve Jorgensen" <nospam@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:4cq411lct5g5bu0c7pqbeds64i0s5973aj@4ax.com...
>I think the Yamaha AW2816 and its ilk could do that with the mLAN option
> board. Of course, the option board alone is $500 which seems like quite a
> rip-off to me when a Firewire port for a PC costs under $50.

Make that "under $11".

geoff
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 3:17:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hev wrote:

> I just contacted Metric Halo and while they have no release date for a PC
> driver now, it does seem like it is on the horizon.

They've been saying that for two years. <g> Several Windows folks
wanting to go mobile with an MIO have bought Apple laptops.

--
ha
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 3:17:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
news:1gs33v4.1klrjoq1pdvmsyN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> Hev wrote:
>
>> I just contacted Metric Halo and while they have no release date for a PC
>> driver now, it does seem like it is on the horizon.
>
> They've been saying that for two years. <g> Several Windows folks
> wanting to go mobile with an MIO have bought Apple laptops.


I would do that... but I've never owned a MAC. And when I had to use them at
audio school it was never a good thing. Still like Nuendo better than Pro
Tools. Still like PC's better than MAC's. I guess what I'm saying is "which
I could make the leap". I know it wouldn't be too hard with the new MAC OS.
I liked the last few versions when I had to use them. Still hard to drop
that kind of money on a MAC product.

--

-Hev
remove your opinion to find me here:
www.michaelYOURspringerOPINION.com
http://www.freeiPods.com/?r=14089013
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 3:17:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

hank alrich wrote:
> Hev wrote:
>
>
>>I just contacted Metric Halo and while they have no release date for a PC
>>driver now, it does seem like it is on the horizon.
>
>
> They've been saying that for two years. <g> Several Windows folks
> wanting to go mobile with an MIO have bought Apple laptops.

Yep. I'm one. It's been longer than two years and I don't
think there is any real intention to do anything for Win.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 3:51:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

*snip*
> Notebooks can be used these days for live recording....but unless you
> bring along your interface, and all the ADAT/TFIF adaptor things, you
> are again limited to about 8 - 12 tracks. All the portable interfaces I
> see say "24 tracks" but they only have 8 analog inputs/outputs...if you
> want more you need to hook up ADAT or TDIF boxes...suddenly you have a
> notebook, it's audio interface, one or two other hardware boxes and all
> the cabling and problems that go with a four piece solution.
*snip*

Well here's my (semi-)mobile setup right now. Two MOTU 896s and my LCD
and tower. Even with that i'm up and running in about 3 minutes. I plan
on buying an external drive and a laptop so that my rig will basically
fit on my lap (hypothetically). Each of the 8 ins has a pre with
independant 48V. Nice clean unit... does just what you need and no more.
I've got tons of my buddies drooling over the ease of use of my rig.

Works like a charm man.

Roach

(btw, using WinXP with Cubase SX... and you can hook up 4 motu's
together at once (32 channels)
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 9:00:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bob Cain wrote:

> hank alrich wrote:
> > Hev wrote:

> >>I just contacted Metric Halo and while they have no release date for a PC
> >>driver now, it does seem like it is on the horizon.

> > They've been saying that for two years. <g> Several Windows folks
> > wanting to go mobile with an MIO have bought Apple laptops.

> Yep. I'm one. It's been longer than two years and I don't
> think there is any real intention to do anything for Win.

I think they're too samll, they haven't the resources to deal with
opening that potential market. It offers both huge sales potential and a
potential Pandora's box of support headaches. At the Emagic-to-Apple
cusp Windows was something like 35% of the Logic market and 70% of its
support costs. I don't think Metric Halo can reasonably go there. Could
be wrong, and perhaps they will get to the pont that there are at least
drivers for their units under some recent Windows version.

--
ha
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 12:11:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Yeah there are a ton of things like that, but none of them have more
than 8 - 10 analog ins and outs.

Other than Pro Tools hardware and the MOTU 24 i/o, the market is geared
towards people that record two to eight tracks at once.

Analogeezer
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 12:16:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Exactly, and then put a drive in it and a set of transport buttons to
use as a standalone...I like the idea of one firewire cable instead of
six ADAT cables.

Then if you are at home you just bypass the internal drive if you want
to and use it strictly as an interface.

You can do that with an HD24 now, but you have to buy 24 channels of
ADAT i/o for your computer and then the six cables.

IIRC the MOTU 24 i/o is pretty cool but works off a dedicated PCI
car...so that rules that out with a laptop.

Analogeezer
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 8:25:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hev> wrote:

> In that case, no I really don't want to deal with a MAC. Looks like a PC
> laptop with 2 MOTU's is the way I'm heading. I'll just have to get one
> superb mic pre for overdubs.

The PC folks who bought Mac laptops to run an MIO did so because their
judgement was that the MOTU conversion is nowhere near the caliber of
the MIO's conversion.

> Does anyone know if I can pair a True Systems Precision 8 with say a MOTU
> 828 MKII?

If it has 8 analog inputs, yes.

--
ha
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 8:25:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

hank alrich wrote:
> Hev> wrote:
>
>
>> In that case, no I really don't want to deal with a MAC. Looks like a PC
>> laptop with 2 MOTU's is the way I'm heading. I'll just have to get one
>> superb mic pre for overdubs.
>
>
> The PC folks who bought Mac laptops to run an MIO did so because their
> judgement was that the MOTU conversion is nowhere near the caliber of
> the MIO's conversion.


See RME Fireface 800.
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 8:25:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1gs4e87.1hkb5wc1qrcg0mN%walkinay@thegrid.net>,
walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich) wrote:

> Hev> wrote:
>
> > In that case, no I really don't want to deal with a MAC. Looks like a PC
> > laptop with 2 MOTU's is the way I'm heading. I'll just have to get one
> > superb mic pre for overdubs.
>
> The PC folks who bought Mac laptops to run an MIO did so because their
> judgement was that the MOTU conversion is nowhere near the caliber of
> the MIO's conversion.

Was that before or after the 828mkII/896HD units were out? I find the
converters in the newer MOTUs pretty good.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 8:50:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<analogeezer wrote:

> Other than Pro Tools hardware and the MOTU 24 i/o, the market is geared
> towards people that record two to eight tracks at once.

RME has rig with a few more inputs, and MIO's can be used in parallel
for more inputs, the Lynx folks have some nice multichannel convertors
in the pipe.

I do recall being able to work with a eight-track machine, though. <g>

--
ha
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 9:22:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
news:1gs4e87.1hkb5wc1qrcg0mN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> Hev> wrote:
>
>> In that case, no I really don't want to deal with a MAC. Looks like a PC
>> laptop with 2 MOTU's is the way I'm heading. I'll just have to get one
>> superb mic pre for overdubs.
>
> The PC folks who bought Mac laptops to run an MIO did so because their
> judgement was that the MOTU conversion is nowhere near the caliber of
> the MIO's conversion.
>
>> Does anyone know if I can pair a True Systems Precision 8 with say a MOTU
>> 828 MKII?
>
> If it has 8 analog inputs, yes.


Indeed it does. I should have been more specific and asked if anyone had
experience using the two together.

I have also read that the MOTU conversion isn't so hot... maybe RME is the
way to go.

--
-hev
remove "your opinion" to find me:
www.michaelYOURspringerOPINION.com
http://www.freeiPods.com/?r=14089013
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 9:24:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jay Kadis wrote:

> (hank alrich) wrote:

> > Hev> wrote:

> > > In that case, no I really don't want to deal with a MAC. Looks like a PC
> > > laptop with 2 MOTU's is the way I'm heading. I'll just have to get one
> > > superb mic pre for overdubs.

> > The PC folks who bought Mac laptops to run an MIO did so because their
> > judgement was that the MOTU conversion is nowhere near the caliber of
> > the MIO's conversion.

> Was that before or after the 828mkII/896HD units were out? I find the
> converters in the newer MOTUs pretty good.

Both, and some folks are still saying it. I can't vouch for their
perceptions. I'm not able to point fingers at conversion when stuff
sounds poorly. If the MIO's conversion isn't good enough for me it'd be
because I'm not good enough for it. <g>

--
ha
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 9:24:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Kurt Albershardt wrote:

> hank alrich wrote:
> > Hev> wrote:

> >> In that case, no I really don't want to deal with a MAC. Looks like a PC
> >> laptop with 2 MOTU's is the way I'm heading. I'll just have to get one
> >> superb mic pre for overdubs.

> > The PC folks who bought Mac laptops to run an MIO did so because their
> > judgement was that the MOTU conversion is nowhere near the caliber of
> > the MIO's conversion.

> See RME Fireface 800.

Yeah, but where was it two years ago? <g> All reports I read suggest
it's very good.

--
ha
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 9:39:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It takes planning, dollars, and time to set up a good portable system.
Planning, for example, in my GigRig and my less than glorious access to the
Crest XR20's I/O on the back. Dollars, because it was going to cost
somewhere near $1900 for a couple of 138 multipin connectors and wiring to
have two rack systems plus snake easily connect, and time simply to design
it all.

But it's a one shot thing, and the time doing all the above kicks butt over
doing it over and over again. After the above, we're now talking about a
roll in, a couple of connections with screw on multipin connections, run
your snake, hook up your mics and place them, and you're done and ready to
record. If you're really smart, you have a "live" connection and a "splits"
connection. Hook up the right one and everything else is already achieved.

Look for adding/changing/designing carts like field recordists do, with nice
big 20" bicycle wheels that will roll over all types of terrain and you've
even beat most of your competition (of which I would be one since we're both
here in the DC area).

If you want to build your own, look for rolled aluminium tubing and start
from the ground up.

What I'm saying is that you are looking at the problem from the wrong
perspective. It makes no difference about the equipment you use to do the
recording, the idea is easy, quick and reliable setup. The only drawback on
this approach is that it may well require that you have duplicates of I/O
devices, but to tell you the truth, my time is worth more than doing job
after job with an hour of cable connections.

Hell, even buy some inexpensive ramp ends and build some roll in ramps so
you don't have to pick up a setup that may now way a couple of hundred
pounds with all the hardware.

I've had National Events do a couple of events for us, and even with a
couple of Soundcraft Delta 48s they were still setup before the band, and
broken down and gone before we got out of there. Planning is the key to
implementation, but spending the money once in actual dollars will save you
time on the clock every time.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

<analogeezer@aerosolkings.com> wrote in message
news:1108496007.551802.107970@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I use a DAW at home, but taking it out to do location recording is a
> PITA. At the same time I really wish the DAW had more analog inputs...I
> only have 8 to 10 available at once. I plan to get a MOTU 24 i/o at
> some point but again that is a mess of stuff to take out live.
>
> Notebooks can be used these days for live recording....but unless you
> bring along your interface, and all the ADAT/TFIF adaptor things, you
> are again limited to about 8 - 12 tracks. All the portable interfaces I
> see say "24 tracks" but they only have 8 analog inputs/outputs...if you
> want more you need to hook up ADAT or TDIF boxes...suddenly you have a
> notebook, it's audio interface, one or two other hardware boxes and all
> the cabling and problems that go with a four piece solution.
>
> The hardware digital recorders on the other hand are fairly small and
> compact, and it's all in one box...converters, disk drives, meters,
> etc. But the way they integrate with the computer seems pretty klugey.
> The one thing nice about them is they are priced at about or below what
> 24 channels of analog I/O costs...but integration with the DAW is not
> as good as a dedicated firewire/PCI interface
>
> What would be cool is if they made a hardware digital recorder that
> could be used as a standalone recorder like they are now...OR in your
> studio you hook it up to your DAW via firewire and it acts just like a
> regular audio interface...bypassing the internal disk drives but still
> letting you use the metering.
>
> I guess the Alesis comes the closest to doing this, but their Firewire
> transfer is a separate "dock" that you pull the drive out and then blow
> into the computer, right? As far as I know you can't run through the
> Alesis "live" as a converter to your DAW, right?
>
> Also the FST format of the Alesis needs to be converted to wav, right?
>
> Maybe I am looking at too narrow of a market niche, but at the prices
> they go for, a 24 track digital hardware recorder that could double as
> an audio interface for a computer would be really cool...
>
> Analogeezer
>
!