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Customer Surveys uses caller ID

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August 27, 2004 7:21:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

I was just contacted by a company doing customer satisfaction surveys
for Sprint PCS. It was strange that they called me at a telephone
number that I never disclosed. Then it later occured to me that I
contacted Sprint PCS for an issue a few days back from that telephone.

It seems like Sprint PCS uses caller ID to obtain your telephone
number and later passes that number to the group to handle the
customer surveys.

While I think it is good for them to improve by conducting such
surveys, how they go about getting your telephone number to survey you
is sneaky.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 1:36:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

FYI..assuming you called an 800 number......when you call an 800 or toll
free 877 number or whatever, the company you call automatically has your
number as they are paying for the call.....call it automatic caller id even
if your number is blocked.

This is something I have known for years but it really came to light several
months ago. That is when I was contacted via mail by a collection agency
trying to collect on traffic tickets from 1989/1990 in Phoenix AZ..I live in
Washington. I got the letter and called them with my cellphone. I called
the only number they had listed on the paper. It is obvious why they only
list an 800 number. It isn't for your convenience it is so they can get
your number and harass you. Anyway a few days later they start calling me
and they have called me about 4 times a week since then. I never answer and
they still call but have stopped leaving messages. I replied via certified
letter telling them to reply via mail only,right after I called them
initially, but they still call. Of course it is against the Federal Trade
Commission laws pertaining to the Fair Debt Collection Act that they still
call me after I have asked them not to, but it is still annoying that they
call..the message here of course is never call a toll free number if you
wish to have anonymity. By the way I have permanent caller id block on my
phone..it still doesn't matter with toll free calls.

CaptainKrunch





"Ross" <googlegroups@emailjunk.com> wrote in message
news:c89b70c4.0408271421.1c8f136e@posting.google.com...
> I was just contacted by a company doing customer satisfaction surveys
> for Sprint PCS. It was strange that they called me at a telephone
> number that I never disclosed. Then it later occured to me that I
> contacted Sprint PCS for an issue a few days back from that telephone.
>
> It seems like Sprint PCS uses caller ID to obtain your telephone
> number and later passes that number to the group to handle the
> customer surveys.
>
> While I think it is good for them to improve by conducting such
> surveys, how they go about getting your telephone number to survey you
> is sneaky.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 2:38:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Ross" burbled to the world:

> I was just contacted by a company doing customer satisfaction surveys
> for Sprint PCS. It was strange that they called me at a telephone
> number that I never disclosed. Then it later occured to me that I
> contacted Sprint PCS for an issue a few days back from that telephone.
>
> It seems like Sprint PCS uses caller ID to obtain your telephone
> number and later passes that number to the group to handle the
> customer surveys.
>
> While I think it is good for them to improve by conducting such
> surveys, how they go about getting your telephone number to survey you
> is sneaky.


Has it occurred to you that your telephone company probably
already knew your phone number? They hardly have to do anything
"sneaky" to find the number that THEY assigned you.

Chris
Related resources
August 28, 2004 2:38:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Chris Pisarra" <Chris@Pisarra.com> wrote in message news:<QJOXc.326251$%_6.92181@attbi_s01>...
> Has it occurred to you that your telephone company probably
> already knew your phone number? They hardly have to do anything
> "sneaky" to find the number that THEY assigned you.
>
> Chris

Well, the thing is that I don't "own" that telephone line as Sprint
called me at my work location. I don't even own a landline at home.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 3:43:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

In article <QJOXc.326251$%_6.92181@attbi_s01>,
"Chris Pisarra" <Chris@Pisarra.com> writes:
[snip]
>
> Has it occurred to you that your telephone company probably
> already knew your phone number? They hardly have to do anything
> "sneaky" to find the number that THEY assigned you.

Erm, doesn't CS always ask for your number, anyway?

--
Jim Seymour | PGP Public Key available at:
| http://www.uk.pgp.net/pgpnet/pks-commands.html
|
| http://jimsun.LinxNet.com
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 8:01:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Ross" <googlegroups@emailjunk.com> wrote in message news:c89b70c4.0408271421.1c8f136e@posting.google.com...
> While I think it is good for them to improve by conducting such
> surveys, how they go about getting your telephone number to survey you
> is sneaky.

Anytime you call a toll-free number, the place you are calling gets
your phone number via ANI, not CID. It doesn't matter if you call
from a phone that has CID blocked.

--

John Richards
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 12:53:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

This doesn't apply ONLY to toll-free numbers now. Even though you
block Caller ID, your CPN or Calling Party Number is still sent on
EVERY call. Toll free numbers generally use ANI and CPN to receive
your phone number. However, many voip providers and other services
available to the public are allowing the average joe to receive CPN
even if it is marked private. Give me call 206-203-0225 w/ your
number blocked =)

"CaptainKrunch" <nobody@nothing.com> wrote in message news:<m8KdnWCBGvNOlq3cRVn-pw@comcast.com>...
> FYI..assuming you called an 800 number......when you call an 800 or toll
> free 877 number or whatever, the company you call automatically has your
> number as they are paying for the call.....call it automatic caller id even
> if your number is blocked.
>
> This is something I have known for years but it really came to light several
> months ago. That is when I was contacted via mail by a collection agency
> trying to collect on traffic tickets from 1989/1990 in Phoenix AZ..I live in
> Washington. I got the letter and called them with my cellphone. I called
> the only number they had listed on the paper. It is obvious why they only
> list an 800 number. It isn't for your convenience it is so they can get
> your number and harass you. Anyway a few days later they start calling me
> and they have called me about 4 times a week since then. I never answer and
> they still call but have stopped leaving messages. I replied via certified
> letter telling them to reply via mail only,right after I called them
> initially, but they still call. Of course it is against the Federal Trade
> Commission laws pertaining to the Fair Debt Collection Act that they still
> call me after I have asked them not to, but it is still annoying that they
> call..the message here of course is never call a toll free number if you
> wish to have anonymity. By the way I have permanent caller id block on my
> phone..it still doesn't matter with toll free calls.
>
> CaptainKrunch
>
>
>
>
>
> "Ross" <googlegroups@emailjunk.com> wrote in message
> news:c89b70c4.0408271421.1c8f136e@posting.google.com...
> > I was just contacted by a company doing customer satisfaction surveys
> > for Sprint PCS. It was strange that they called me at a telephone
> > number that I never disclosed. Then it later occured to me that I
> > contacted Sprint PCS for an issue a few days back from that telephone.
> >
> > It seems like Sprint PCS uses caller ID to obtain your telephone
> > number and later passes that number to the group to handle the
> > customer surveys.
> >
> > While I think it is good for them to improve by conducting such
> > surveys, how they go about getting your telephone number to survey you
> > is sneaky.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 4:59:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

>Anytime you call a toll-free number, the place you are calling gets
>your phone number via ANI, not CID. It doesn't matter if you call
>from a phone that has CID blocked.

This is a common misconception. The FCC has rules that say WHOEVER pays for the
call gets to know the number.

If you are paying for a call, you of course know the number because you are
dialing it.

If you are dialing an 800 number, you don't pay for it nor do you know the
number it is calling. The owner of the 800 number gets your number (on the
bill) although maybe not on their caller ID on their phone.

So, keep in mind, any call to an 800 number (including 866, 877, and any of the
other 800 variants) your number gets reported to the called party.

--
John S.
e-mail responses to - john at kiana dot net
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 4:59:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"John S." <sexyexotiche@aol.comspamfree> wrote in message
news:20040828085954.25600.00004834@mb-m29.aol.com...
> >Anytime you call a toll-free number, the place you are calling gets
> >your phone number via ANI, not CID. It doesn't matter if you call
> >from a phone that has CID blocked.
>
> This is a common misconception. The FCC has rules that say WHOEVER pays
for the
> call gets to know the number.
>

Unless you're a cellular customer paying for incoming minutes.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 4:59:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

Scott Stephenson wrote:

> Unless you're a cellular customer paying for incoming minutes.

....and you don't use Cingular. Cingular is the *only* carrier that has a clue
about this issue and actually gives incoming phone numbers.

Verizon has the stupid position that the caller that is calling and costing me
money deserves privacy. Come on - they could AT LEAST present phone numbers
where CID is NOT blocked.

Haven't broached the subject with Sprint yet.

--
JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 5:01:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

>Well, the thing is that I don't "own" that telephone line as Sprint
>called me at my work location. I don't even own a landline at home.
>
>

When you signed up for Sprint Service, did you put your place of employment on
the application? For any credit it is normally required.

It has been years and years since I got service and I don't know what went on
that application (in fact my wife signed us up for Sprint PCS service)

--
John S.
e-mail responses to - john at kiana dot net
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 9:18:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

>Unless you're a cellular customer paying for incoming minutes.

800 numbers don't place calls to cell phones. ALL calls are made from regular
phones or cell phones. An 800 number can be assigned to your cell phone, but
then you pay twice - your 800 number and your cell phone.

But I am not sure what your comment means.

--
John S.
e-mail responses to - john at kiana dot net
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 9:18:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"John S." <sexyexotiche@aol.comspamfree> wrote in message
news:20040828131851.06753.00003748@mb-m13.aol.com...
> >Unless you're a cellular customer paying for incoming minutes.
>
> 800 numbers don't place calls to cell phones. ALL calls are made from
regular
> phones or cell phones. An 800 number can be assigned to your cell phone,
but
> then you pay twice - your 800 number and your cell phone.
>
> But I am not sure what your comment means.
>
> --

It was in response to this statement:

"This is a common misconception. The FCC has rules that say WHOEVER pays for
the
call gets to know the number. "

Many cellular users pay for incoming calls, and yet do not get to know the
number.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 9:19:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

>> Unless you're a cellular customer paying for incoming minutes.
>
>...and you don't use Cingular. Cingular is the *only* carrier that has a clue
>
>about this issue and actually gives incoming phone numbers.

They all give incoming phone numbers. The conversation is about 800 service!


--
John S.
e-mail responses to - john at kiana dot net
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 9:19:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"John S." <sexyexotiche@aol.comspamfree> wrote in message
news:20040828131945.06753.00003749@mb-m13.aol.com...
> >> Unless you're a cellular customer paying for incoming minutes.
> >
> >...and you don't use Cingular. Cingular is the *only* carrier that has a
clue
> >
> >about this issue and actually gives incoming phone numbers.
>
> They all give incoming phone numbers. The conversation is about 800
service!
>
>
> --

If they did, we wouldn't get blocked number calls on cell phones, and all
incoming calls would have a phone number associated to them on the bill.
They don't.
Anonymous
August 29, 2004 12:29:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"John S." <sexyexotiche@aol.comspamfree> wrote in message news:20040828131851.06753.00003748@mb-m13.aol.com...
> >Unless you're a cellular customer paying for incoming minutes.
>
> 800 numbers don't place calls to cell phones. ALL calls are made from regular
> phones or cell phones. An 800 number can be assigned to your cell phone, but
> then you pay twice - your 800 number and your cell phone.
>
> But I am not sure what your comment means.

He's changing the topic of discussion to his pet peeve--
insisting on mandatory disclosure of all incoming call phone numbers
on his monthly SPCS statement.

--

John Richards
Anonymous
August 29, 2004 12:29:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"John Richards" <supportdesk70-NO-SPAM@NO.SPAM.sbcglobal.net> wrote in
message news:1X5Yc.1199$t13.975@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
> "John S." <sexyexotiche@aol.comspamfree> wrote in message
news:20040828131851.06753.00003748@mb-m13.aol.com...
> > >Unless you're a cellular customer paying for incoming minutes.
> >
> > 800 numbers don't place calls to cell phones. ALL calls are made from
regular
> > phones or cell phones. An 800 number can be assigned to your cell phone,
but
> > then you pay twice - your 800 number and your cell phone.
> >
> > But I am not sure what your comment means.
>
> He's changing the topic of discussion to his pet peeve--
> insisting on mandatory disclosure of all incoming call phone numbers
> on his monthly SPCS statement.
>
> --
>
I didn't see any insisting there- just made an observation. However, unlike
you, I do find it interesting that there are two sets of rules.

BTW- its not a pet peeve- you've just never made a rational argument against
it. If an 800 number gets all caller information by paying for the call,
cellular users should be given the same opportunity. And before you start
your 'privacy' hissy, you can maintain your privacy by not calling a cell
phone.
Anonymous
August 29, 2004 8:50:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Scott Stephenson" <scott.stephensonson@adelphia.net> wrote in message news:bt-dnYRdscyPcK3cRVn-hg@adelphia.com...
> And before you start
> your 'privacy' hissy, you can maintain your privacy by not calling a cell
> phone.

Not a solution. I may not know that the number I'm calling
belongs to a cell phone.

--

John Richards
Anonymous
August 29, 2004 1:35:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"John Richards" <supportdesk70-NO-SPAM@NO.SPAM.sbcglobal.net> wrote in
message news:SgdYc.6276$ZC7.1523@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
> "Scott Stephenson" <scott.stephensonson@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:bt-dnYRdscyPcK3cRVn-hg@adelphia.com...
> > And before you start
> > your 'privacy' hissy, you can maintain your privacy by not calling a
cell
> > phone.
>
> Not a solution. I may not know that the number I'm calling
> belongs to a cell phone.
>

And if the cell phone is mine, isn't it my privacy that is at question?
After all, unless you are making a prank call, you know who you are calling,
make the conscious decision to do so and identify yourself when I pick up
the phone. Is that the problem? Do people tend not to pick up the phone
when they know it is you?

Your lame argument has always put the caller's privacy as more important,
when in fact they are the intrusive party in this situation.
Anonymous
August 29, 2004 8:12:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Ross" <googlegroups@emailjunk.com> wrote in message
news:c89b70c4.0408271421.1c8f136e@posting.google.com...
> I was just contacted by a company doing customer satisfaction surveys
> for Sprint PCS. It was strange that they called me at a telephone
> number that I never disclosed. Then it later occured to me that I
> contacted Sprint PCS for an issue a few days back from that telephone.
>
> It seems like Sprint PCS uses caller ID to obtain your telephone
> number and later passes that number to the group to handle the
> customer surveys.
>
> While I think it is good for them to improve by conducting such
> surveys, how they go about getting your telephone number to survey you
> is sneaky.

If you called a "Toll-free" 800,888,866,877 number you handed them your ID
on a silver platter. It's tariffed that way due to them paying for the call.
Callblock WILL NOT WORK on tollfree numbers.
This is a stunt that satellite companies use to see if/when you move a RCVR.
!