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Sweetwater CR computers?

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February 22, 2005 4:42:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

So Sweetwater has their Creation Station audio computer turnkey
solution thing. The design seems to focus on creating a quiet system,
which I am all for but has anyone ever used one of these things? Will
they be upgradeable or are you locking yourself into a system and
paying for things that will have to be discarded when new software and
hardware get developed?
The reason I ask, I am in the market for a new computer and would
prefer an "audio specific" one. In other words I don't need a lot of
the extras that come with packages you might get from Dell or Gateway
or Apple. BUT I am wary of most of the "build you own computer places"
just because it is hard to know what components will work with your
software.
Incedentally I am planning on running a digi 002 and Reason on whatever
I end up getting.
Thanks
John

More about : sweetwater computers

Anonymous
February 23, 2005 9:51:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1109108569.292855.300610@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com> jpayne@berrypr.com writes:

> So Sweetwater has their Creation Station audio computer turnkey
> solution thing. The design seems to focus on creating a quiet system,
> which I am all for but has anyone ever used one of these things?

Any time you mention a turnkey system around here, you'll be flooded
with responses about how much you're paying for someone else to do
work that you can do yourself. Just you wait and see. <g>

I suspect that as long as the Sweetwater folks have been around music
and computers, they have a pretty good idea of what makes a good
system and it will do what they claim. It's up to you to decide
whether it's worth paying their price, or shopping case, mother board,
CPU, memory, power supply, disk drives, graphic board, monitor, and
installing the operating system and optimizing it for audio. You'll
probalby save a few hundred bucks but it might take you a couple of
months from start to finish.

> Will
> they be upgradeable or are you locking yourself into a system and
> paying for things that will have to be discarded when new software and
> hardware get developed?

You'll always have to discard things to accommodate new software and
hardware. If it's a PC-based system (I assume it is since there are
few custom-built Macs) you'll be able to upgrade components, but I
suspect that you'll be on your own for that.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
February 23, 2005 1:04:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I echo what Mike said for the most part. I remember how much we paid for
custom Intergraph machines for CAD work and it makes me cringe, but at the
same time because each and every component has been tested and verified to
work together they stand behind it top to bottom for support, which is part
of the premium in the price. Companies that build custom gaming machines
tout the same thing.

But, you can build a better machine, hardware-wise, for less money, if you
know how to do it. Hardware incompatibilities are not as common as you might
think so long as you know what you are doing. The mobo is designed for a
certain processor of certain speed and bus structure, the memory is designed
for certain type and speed of RAM, the processor specs are standardized,
etc. Unless you have a faulty piece of equipment or you buy something that
is just plain incompatible (DDR333 RAM for a mobo that only support up to
DDR266, etc.), you aren't going to run into incompatibility issues at this
level.

Where you are going to potentially run into stuff is with anything touching
the PCI bus but honestly even this is rare. Find what you want hardware-wise
ahead of time, check the manufacturer's website for known issues, and then
you will be fine to proceed. I personally would never purchase a pre-built
machine because I can build better for less, and I know what I am doing, but
lots of people don't, or don't have the time to mess with it, and feel it is
better just to pay more up front.

I guess I say all that to say, whatever floats your boat!

-Ben



"JOhn" <jpayne@berrypr.com> wrote in message
news:1109108569.292855.300610@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> So Sweetwater has their Creation Station audio computer turnkey
> solution thing. The design seems to focus on creating a quiet system,
> which I am all for but has anyone ever used one of these things? Will
> they be upgradeable or are you locking yourself into a system and
> paying for things that will have to be discarded when new software and
> hardware get developed?
> The reason I ask, I am in the market for a new computer and would
> prefer an "audio specific" one. In other words I don't need a lot of
> the extras that come with packages you might get from Dell or Gateway
> or Apple. BUT I am wary of most of the "build you own computer places"
> just because it is hard to know what components will work with your
> software.
> Incedentally I am planning on running a digi 002 and Reason on whatever
> I end up getting.
> Thanks
> John
>
Related resources
Anonymous
February 23, 2005 9:59:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

JOhn wrote:

> The reason I ask, I am in the market for a new computer and would
> prefer an "audio specific" one. In other words I don't need a lot of
> the extras that come with packages you might get from Dell or Gateway
> or Apple.

Extras like what?

> Incedentally I am planning on running a digi 002 and Reason on whatever
> I end up getting.

Then step one is to determine what Digi says is approved hardware to run
the 002.

--
ha
February 24, 2005 9:38:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

hank alrich wrote:

>
> Extras like what?

Extras such as including monitors and dvd drives and software packages
with AOL. That sort of thing. Most higher end systems probably do not
do this but just tooling around on manufacturers sites brought it to my
attention.



>
> Then step one is to determine what Digi says is approved hardware to
run
> the 002.

Supposedly The sweetwater folks designed these turnkey systems only
with approved hardware. However as new processors and software come
out, Digi is not as fast to say they work....probably because it takes
time. I am curious how the new Reason 3 works with Pro tools.
Anonymous
February 24, 2005 12:28:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1109125291k@trad...
>
> In article <1109108569.292855.300610@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>
jpayne@berrypr.com writes:
>
> > So Sweetwater has their Creation Station audio computer turnkey
> > solution thing. The design seems to focus on creating a quiet system,
> > which I am all for but has anyone ever used one of these things?
>
> Any time you mention a turnkey system around here, you'll be flooded
> with responses about how much you're paying for someone else to do
> work that you can do yourself. Just you wait and see. <g>
>
>
>

Mike, I'm sure you'll prove right on that one - I'll be the first to
demonstrate! I purchased a computer a little over a month ago, for
recording at our church and took the following route:

Dell P4 3Ghz w/HT 800Mhz fsb
512 meg Ram
80 HDD
17" LCD
$775

additional 17" Dell LCD
$300

Dual VGA 128 meg graphics card
$60

4U Rackmount Case
$90

250 gig 7200rpm HDD
$140

Total price was a little under $1400 with shipping.
This turned out really good for me. It is a little extra work than a turnkey
system, but I enjoy messing with stuff like that anyway so it was a win/win
situation for us. YMMV of course.

regards
Ron Wiebe

(all right, who will step up after me to prove Mike correct?!!)
Anonymous
February 24, 2005 7:21:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1109255895.072186.235710@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> jpayne@berrypr.com writes:

> Extras such as including monitors and dvd drives and software packages
> with AOL. That sort of thing. Most higher end systems probably do not
> do this but just tooling around on manufacturers sites brought it to my
> attention.

You'll see packages that include a monitor and printer at the big box
stores, and just about every retail computer has AOL installed on it.
But if you ask, they'll usually have a price on just the computer (but
it will still have AOL on it).

There seems to be less bundling of useful software these days. Used to
be that they'd include Microsoft Office or the equivalent Lotus bundle
(the one with Word Perfect) or at least Word and Excel, but you don't
see that much any more. These days the "extras" tend to be things that
help you manage piles of photos or edit video if it has a DVD-R drive.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
!