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Does Wi-Fi cost anything?

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Anonymous
June 22, 2004 12:26:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Hi all,
I'm thinking of buying a Tungsten C & I've got a question. Do you need an
account with some sort of Service Provider in order to use Wi-Fi, or is it
free to use? I'm hoping that the only thing that you have to pay for is your
Internet Service Provider for the time that you're on line, but I just want
to know if there are any other costs involved.
Thanks for your help,
Patrick.

More about : cost

Anonymous
June 22, 2004 12:26:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Patrick" <someone@microsoft.com> writes:

> Hi all,
> I'm thinking of buying a Tungsten C & I've got a question. Do you need an
> account with some sort of Service Provider in order to use Wi-Fi, or is it
> free to use? I'm hoping that the only thing that you have to pay for is your
> Internet Service Provider for the time that you're on line, but I just want
> to know if there are any other costs involved.

It's free to use. That is, Wifi is a kind of Citizen Band: anybody
can emit (at the real low power allowed, = 50 m range). To be
usefull, you need to have another computer in this 50 m range. For
example, I can transfer files between my Tungsten C and my iBook.
It's like bluetooth, but with a bigger range. But this is only a
private local LAN. To surf the web with the Tungsten C (or with the
iBook or any other Wifi Computer), you need a router interconnecting
your Wifi LAN with the Internet. So here you need an ISP and a Wifi
Access Point / Router. Now, when you walk in the streets of big
cities with a Tungsten C, you can see that there are a lot of people
who have their own Wifi LAN, and a lot who are paying their ISP and
have a Wifi router, and still a lot who have not closed their Wifi
network (they voluntarily or inadvertently left their Wifi network
unencrypted), so you can hook to their Wifi LAN and use their
connection to the Internet, gratis and unconspicious. Finally, some
telecom operators provide some places (airports, train stations,
wherever...) with a Wifi LAN interconnected to the Internet, but that
you can access only after having paid for the service. So, in these
places, you need some sort of Service Provider to use their Wifi LAN.
But in these same places, you could still open your iBook and
establish your own private Wifi LAN between your Tungsten C and your
iBook to exchange files, freely and gratis (there are up to 14
different Wifi channels that can be used at the same time in the same
place).

If you already have an ISP for your desktop computer, then you'd only
need a Wifi Access Point / Router to be able to connect both your
Tungsten C and your desktop to the Internet at the same time.

--
__Pascal Bourguignon__ http://www.informatimago.com/

There is no worse tyranny than to force a man to pay for what he does not
want merely because you think it would be good for him. -- Robert Heinlein
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 12:26:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Patrick" <someone@microsoft.com> wrote:
>I'm thinking of buying a Tungsten C & I've got a question. Do you need an
>account with some sort of Service Provider in order to use Wi-Fi

If you set up your own Access Point, which is less than $100, you can
use it in your home, connected to your broadband connection, without
any additional charges.

If you want to use the for-pay HotSpots at places like Starbucks, you
need an account, which will have various {hourly, daily, monthly}
rates, and may gt you a significant discount if you have their
preferred cellphone carrier.

--
William Smith
ComputerSmiths Consulting, Inc. www.compusmiths.com
Related resources
June 22, 2004 12:26:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 20:26:45 +1200, "Patrick" <someone@microsoft.com>,wrote:

>Hi all,
>I'm thinking of buying a Tungsten C & I've got a question. Do you need an
>account with some sort of Service Provider in order to use Wi-Fi, or is it
>free to use? I'm hoping that the only thing that you have to pay for is your
>Internet Service Provider for the time that you're on line, but I just want
>to know if there are any other costs involved.
>Thanks for your help,
>Patrick.
>

If you are talking about a WiFi gateway into the internet then yes it will cost
you something.
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 12:26:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

# Pascal Bourguignon

> inte

If you've seen those ITBoxes in pubs in the UK (they are like flash-game
gambling machines) I think you can put money into them and use them as
wi-fi hotspots. You pay (perhaps £2?) and get a code that lets you use it
for a while.

--
Toby
~~FA: Quantum Redshift & Luigi's Mansion
~~http://tinyurl.com/34xwk
~~Starts at 10p
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 12:26:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

>On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 20:26:45 +1200, "Patrick" <someone@microsoft.com>,wrote:
>
>>Hi all,
>>I'm thinking of buying a Tungsten C & I've got a question. Do you need an
>>account with some sort of Service Provider in order to use Wi-Fi, or is it
>>free to use? I'm hoping that the only thing that you have to pay for is your
>>Internet Service Provider for the time that you're on line, but I just want
>>to know if there are any other costs involved.
>>Thanks for your help,
>>Patrick.
>>
The issue is range. You will get a signal for about 30 to 100 feet.

Are you trying to use it at home or on the road?

If at home, you will need to have a high speed internet connection and
wireless transmitter. The transmitter cost me about $100. My laptop
picks up about 30 feet away inside the house.

On the road, there are few places you can get free Wi-Fi.
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 3:04:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 20:26:45 +1200, "Patrick"
<someone@microsoft.com>,wrote:

>Hi all,
>I'm thinking of buying a Tungsten C & I've got a question. Do you need
>an account with some sort of Service Provider in order to use Wi-Fi, or
>is it free to use? I'm hoping that the only thing that you have to pay
>for is your Internet Service Provider for the time that you're on line,
>but I just want to know if there are any other costs involved.
>Thanks for your help,
>Patrick.

If you are talking about home, then you will need to get a WiFi base
station (802.11b or 802.11g base station; search http://dealnews.com and
you should find something with rebates for under $50). If you have a
high speed internet connection already, then you just hook up the WiFi
base station and you should be able to surf wirelessly at home.

If you do not have a high speed internet connection, then you will need
to see about getting one.

If a high speed internet connection is not an option (or just more than
you want to pay), then you need to get a setup that includes a modem
that can use your telephone to connect to your ISP. One option is to
get a WiFi base station that includes a 9 pin PC serial port that can be
attached to an external PC modem (I have seen CompUSA generic modems for
approx $50; you may be able to do better doing an on-line search). The
WiFi base station can then be configured to connect to your ISP via the
modem. If you are a Mac users as well, then an integrated solution is
the Airport Extreme base station with the modem option (rather
expensive, but simple to setup and configure for Mac users).

NOTE: A properly setup WiFi base station will allow you to share your
connection with your home PC, Mac, Linux, etc... computers.

Now if what you want is to sit in Starbucks or other places that offer
WiFi service for a few (like T-Mobile) then the cost is the charge to
use the service. There are also some businesses that offer free WiFi to
attract customers.

And while there are ethical questions, you may find that there are some
unprotected WiFi base stations in your travels that do not prevent you
from using their internet connection. Most likely the owners of these
base stations are violating their service agreement with their ISP.

Bob Harris
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 9:44:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Patrick" <someone@microsoft.com> wrote:

>Hi all,
>I'm thinking of buying a Tungsten C & I've got a question. Do you need an
>account with some sort of Service Provider in order to use Wi-Fi, or is it
>free to use? I'm hoping that the only thing that you have to pay for is your
>Internet Service Provider for the time that you're on line, but I just want
>to know if there are any other costs involved.
>Thanks for your help,
>Patrick.
>

The cost of WiFi depends on where you are.

At home, you add a wireless access point to your existing high speed Internet
connection - if you have one. I paid $26 plus shipping for a D-Link WAP at
www.computergeeks.com

At work, you use the existing WiFi access or add an access point - if you can.
In 1999, I had the task of getting a new Cisco-based wireless network up and
running at a network test lab (I didn't tell them how much fun I was having with
the new toy ;-)

Elsewhere, some service is free (the Hampton Inn I stayed in last week, all Best
Western hotels/motels in the US this fall); some service is paid ($10/day at the
Holiday Inn I was at for a conference in March, by the hour at Starbucks).


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