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Hotsync and Windows XP via serial port

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Anonymous
June 22, 2004 12:27:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

I have an old Palm Pilot Pro and Palm Desktop ver 4.1. Hotsync works
on my laptop that uses Win98SE, but does not work on my Desktop with
Win XP Pro. The serial port on the desktop works with other devices.
I have disabled antivirus, software firewall, anti adware, and anti
pop up ad software.
---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 12:34:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

William J. Burlingame rose quietly and spake the following:

> I have an old Palm Pilot Pro and Palm Desktop ver 4.1. Hotsync works
> on my laptop that uses Win98SE, but does not work on my Desktop with
> Win XP Pro. The serial port on the desktop works with other devices.
> I have disabled antivirus, software firewall, anti adware, and anti
> pop up ad software.

I have synced my old Pilot Pro with my laptop running Windows XP pro
without problems. Have you made sure that Hotsync manager has the "Local
Serial" option selected?

Right click on the hotsync icon in the taskbar and make sure there's a
checkmark in front of "Local Serial" on the context menu.

--
Derek

Heffalumps to the left of me, woozles to the right.
Here I am, stuck in the middle with Pooh.

This epigram brought to you by the letter "L" and the number "3".
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 12:38:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 08:34:35 -0500, Derek <news@gwinn.us> wrote:

>William J. Burlingame rose quietly and spake the following:
>
>> I have an old Palm Pilot Pro and Palm Desktop ver 4.1. Hotsync works
>> on my laptop that uses Win98SE, but does not work on my Desktop with
>> Win XP Pro. The serial port on the desktop works with other devices.
>> I have disabled antivirus, software firewall, anti adware, and anti
>> pop up ad software.
>
>I have synced my old Pilot Pro with my laptop running Windows XP pro
>without problems. Have you made sure that Hotsync manager has the "Local
>Serial" option selected?
>
>Right click on the hotsync icon in the taskbar and make sure there's a
>checkmark in front of "Local Serial" on the context menu.

Yes, it's set up the same on both systems.

---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
Related resources
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 1:42:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

William J. Burlingame rose quietly and spake the following:

> On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 08:34:35 -0500, Derek <news@gwinn.us> wrote:
>
>>William J. Burlingame rose quietly and spake the following:
>>
>>> I have an old Palm Pilot Pro and Palm Desktop ver 4.1. Hotsync works
>>> on my laptop that uses Win98SE, but does not work on my Desktop with
>>> Win XP Pro. The serial port on the desktop works with other devices.
>>> I have disabled antivirus, software firewall, anti adware, and anti
>>> pop up ad software.
>>
>>I have synced my old Pilot Pro with my laptop running Windows XP pro
>>without problems. Have you made sure that Hotsync manager has the "Local
>>Serial" option selected?
>>
>>Right click on the hotsync icon in the taskbar and make sure there's a
>>checkmark in front of "Local Serial" on the context menu.
>
> Yes, it's set up the same on both systems.

Have you got the right COM port selected in the HOtsync setup?

--
Derek

Scintillate, scintillate globule vivific
Fain would I fathom thy nature specific
Loftily perched in the ether capacious
Strongly resembling a gem carbonaceous.

This epigram brought to you by the letter "X" and the number "13".
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 3:07:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 09:42:14 -0500, Derek <news@gwinn.us> wrote:

>William J. Burlingame rose quietly and spake the following:
>
>> On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 08:34:35 -0500, Derek <news@gwinn.us> wrote:
>>
>>>William J. Burlingame rose quietly and spake the following:
>>>
>>>> I have an old Palm Pilot Pro and Palm Desktop ver 4.1. Hotsync works
>>>> on my laptop that uses Win98SE, but does not work on my Desktop with
>>>> Win XP Pro. The serial port on the desktop works with other devices.
>>>> I have disabled antivirus, software firewall, anti adware, and anti
>>>> pop up ad software.
>>>
>>>I have synced my old Pilot Pro with my laptop running Windows XP pro
>>>without problems. Have you made sure that Hotsync manager has the "Local
>>>Serial" option selected?
>>>
>>>Right click on the hotsync icon in the taskbar and make sure there's a
>>>checkmark in front of "Local Serial" on the context menu.
>>
>> Yes, it's set up the same on both systems.
>
>Have you got the right COM port selected in the HOtsync setup?

Yes - COM1 The only one on the computer.

---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 8:59:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

William J. Burlingame <wjburl@bs.net> wrote in
news:o 8mgd013noj2ptoc57fi1r1atl5m50sdns@4ax.com:

> Yes - COM1 The only one on the computer.

Are you positive? One physical serial port does not necessarily equate to
com1. Also, the IRQ settings in the BIOS can make a difference. Have you
tried com3? Have you tinkered with the IRQ settings?

--
Regards,

Stan
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 10:47:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Stan Gosnell" wrote:
>
> William J. Burlingame wrote:
> > Yes - COM1 The only one on the
> > computer.
>
> Are you positive? One physical serial
> port does not necessarily equate to
> com1. Also, the IRQ settings in the
> BIOS can make a difference. Have
> you tried com3? Have you tinkered
> with the IRQ settings?


Well said, Stan. Often the internal modem is using one of the COM ports,
and many modern computers have other internal devices using additional COM
ports. Before messing with the port settings, William, try other ports using
the software settings first (most software using a COM port allows you to
select which port with an internal option).

Dwight Stewart
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 10:47:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Dwight Stewart rose quietly and spake the following:

> "Stan Gosnell" wrote:
>>
>> William J. Burlingame wrote:
>>> Yes - COM1 The only one on the
>>> computer.
>>
>> Are you positive? One physical serial
>> port does not necessarily equate to
>> com1. Also, the IRQ settings in the
>> BIOS can make a difference. Have
>> you tried com3? Have you tinkered
>> with the IRQ settings?
>
>
> Well said, Stan.

Agreed.

> Often the internal modem is using one of the COM ports,
> and many modern computers have other internal devices using additional COM
> ports. Before messing with the port settings, William, try other ports using
> the software settings first (most software using a COM port allows you to
> select which port with an internal option).

In fact, on my desktop, COM1 is the available port. COM3 is the serial
port. And COM8 is my USB to serial adapter for my wife's Vx.

--
Derek

It's lonely at the top.
But it's comforting to look down upon everyone at the bottom.

This epigram brought to you by the letter "C" and the number "16".
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 10:59:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

The system has two COM ports. One is COM1 and the other is used by
the internal modem as COM3.


---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
June 23, 2004 4:58:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 18:59:24 -0500, William J. Burlingame wrote:

> The system has two COM ports. One is COM1 and the other is used by
> the internal modem as COM3.

That may be the source of your problem. Unless specifically
overridden, COM1 and COM3 default to using the same interrupt, IRQ
4, and COM2 and COM4 generally use IRQ 3. I/O addresses used by the
COM ports sometimes conflict, but your best bet is to try to modify
COM1 so that it appears as COM2 using IRQ3. Old computers used to
make these changes by flipping switches or moving jumpers. Your
computer probably can make the changes via its CMOS setup menu.
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 4:58:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

If that's the problem, why can I use COM1 for other devices? Doesn't
Windows handle the sharing of IRQ's?


On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 00:58:00 GMT, BillB <rainbose@earthlink.newt>
wrote:

>On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 18:59:24 -0500, William J. Burlingame wrote:
>
>> The system has two COM ports. One is COM1 and the other is used by
>> the internal modem as COM3.
>
> That may be the source of your problem. Unless specifically
>overridden, COM1 and COM3 default to using the same interrupt, IRQ
>4, and COM2 and COM4 generally use IRQ 3. I/O addresses used by the
>COM ports sometimes conflict, but your best bet is to try to modify
>COM1 so that it appears as COM2 using IRQ3. Old computers used to
>make these changes by flipping switches or moving jumpers. Your
>computer probably can make the changes via its CMOS setup menu.
---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 6:03:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

With classic PC hardware software dispite there being up to 4 COM ports
you can only use 2 at a time -- one odd and one even. Ergo 1 and 3 can't
be used at the same time. This relates to shared IRQ's, interrupts.

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 18:59:24 -0500, William J. Burlingame <wjburl@bs.net>
wrote:

> The system has two COM ports. One is COM1 and the other is used by
> the internal modem as COM3.
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------
>
> bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
> amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
> to send me a message.
>
> Bill Burlingame



--
_____________
Thank a veteran
June 23, 2004 9:13:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 20:58:31 -0500, William J. Burlingame wrote:

> If that's the problem, why can I use COM1 for other devices? Doesn't
> Windows handle the sharing of IRQ's?

If it works for you fine, but you don't appear to be having 100%
success. Some software doesn't use interrupts and works by polling
the I/O ports, preventing conflicts. Using COM ports that share
IRQs hasn't worked for me the few times I've tried it, so by habit I
configure them to eliminate potential conflicts, so I may have
missed an app. that would have worked with an IRQ configured
'incorrectly'. I trust Windows to handle the interrupts (8 through
15) that are 'shared' by hardware through the use of IRQ 2, but
that's another matter, and Windows should have no problem with those
since MSDOS didn't either.
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 12:33:57 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

William J. Burlingame <wjburl@bs.net> wrote in
news:sqohd0dn8ruljs330ruv7gudi305p1q48v@4ax.com:

> If that's the problem, why can I use COM1 for other devices? Doesn't
> Windows handle the sharing of IRQ's?

In general, no. Once a device takes an IRQ, it doesn't relinquish it until
you force it to, usually by disabling that device through hardware or
software. If something else is using Com1, then nothing else can use it
until you disable that something else.

--
Regards,

Stan
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 12:33:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On my System, the modem is on COM3, uses IRQ 22 and address range DF88
- DF8F. COM1 uses IRQ4 and address range 3F8 - 3FF. Modern PC's
aren't restricted by all the limitations imposed by IBM over 20 years
ago. I seem to recall that XP supports as many as 256 COM ports. I
haven't verified that number, that was one reference I read about the
number.

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 20:33:57 GMT, Stan Gosnell
<fakename@fakeaddress.com> wrote:

>William J. Burlingame <wjburl@bs.net> wrote in
>news:sqohd0dn8ruljs330ruv7gudi305p1q48v@4ax.com:
>
>> If that's the problem, why can I use COM1 for other devices? Doesn't
>> Windows handle the sharing of IRQ's?
>
>In general, no. Once a device takes an IRQ, it doesn't relinquish it until
>you force it to, usually by disabling that device through hardware or
>software. If something else is using Com1, then nothing else can use it
>until you disable that something else.

---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 12:33:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Trying to share a COM port and an IRQ are two different things. Two
different COM ports can share an IRQ. When the interrupt comes in,
the driver looks at the status register of the ports to see which
one(s) caused the interrupt and service the appropriate port(s). Two
devices that use the same port - perhaps through an A/B switch or just
swapping cables cannot have the device open at the same time. If the
software for one has the port open and another tries to open the port,
and error will be generated. That's why I have Hotsync setup to run
only when started manually. Both devices can still be installed, but
only one can be open at a time.

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 20:33:57 GMT, Stan Gosnell
<fakename@fakeaddress.com> wrote:

>William J. Burlingame <wjburl@bs.net> wrote in
>news:sqohd0dn8ruljs330ruv7gudi305p1q48v@4ax.com:
>
>> If that's the problem, why can I use COM1 for other devices? Doesn't
>> Windows handle the sharing of IRQ's?
>
>In general, no. Once a device takes an IRQ, it doesn't relinquish it until
>you force it to, usually by disabling that device through hardware or
>software. If something else is using Com1, then nothing else can use it
>until you disable that something else.

---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
June 24, 2004 3:19:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 16:23:11 -0500, William J. Burlingame wrote:

> On my System, the modem is on COM3, uses IRQ 22 and address range DF88
> - DF8F. COM1 uses IRQ4 and address range 3F8 - 3FF. Modern PC's
> aren't restricted by all the limitations imposed by IBM over 20 years
> ago. I seem to recall that XP supports as many as 256 COM ports. I
> haven't verified that number, that was one reference I read about the
> number.

Are you sure about the modem using IRQ 22 or is it a typo? COM3
most often uses IRQ 2, and until now I haven't heard of IRQs above
15. More IRQs would be quite welcome though, and if true, how were
they implemented? The only reasonable solution I can think of would
add another 8 lines (IRQ16 to IRQ23) on the motherboard only, not
available to the PC's bus.
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 3:19:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 23:19:13 GMT, BillB <rainbose@earthlink.newt>
wrote:

>On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 16:23:11 -0500, William J. Burlingame wrote:
>
>> On my System, the modem is on COM3, uses IRQ 22 and address range DF88
>> - DF8F. COM1 uses IRQ4 and address range 3F8 - 3FF. Modern PC's
>> aren't restricted by all the limitations imposed by IBM over 20 years
>> ago. I seem to recall that XP supports as many as 256 COM ports. I
>> haven't verified that number, that was one reference I read about the
>> number.
>
> Are you sure about the modem using IRQ 22 or is it a typo? COM3
>most often uses IRQ 2, and until now I haven't heard of IRQs above
>15. More IRQs would be quite welcome though, and if true, how were
>they implemented? The only reasonable solution I can think of would
>add another 8 lines (IRQ16 to IRQ23) on the motherboard only, not
>available to the PC's bus.

On my system with an ASUS P4P800 Deluxe motherboard and running
Windows XP, if right click on My Computer, select Properties - Device
Manager - View - Resources by Type - IRQ, it show IRQ's starting at 0
and ending at 23. As I said, the old ISA bus based on the old IBM AT
has been enhanced considerably by the PCI bus. Motherboards with a
still newer version of the PCI bus are about to enter the marketplace.
With 64 bit processors available, even the PCI bus is becoming
outdated.

BTW, I forgot that my modem is not on the motherboard as I indicated
earlier, but a card plugged into the PCI bus. It's the device that is
using IRQ 22. I have an ethernet card plugged into the bus that is
using IRQ 21. My NVIDIA graphics card uses IRQ 16 and my RAID
controller uses IRQ 23. All the assignments were made with the
system's plug and play capability.

---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 3:19:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Another term to look up is APIC.

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 20:44:53 -0500, William J. Burlingame
<wjburl@bs.net> wrote:

>On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 23:19:13 GMT, BillB <rainbose@earthlink.newt>
>wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 16:23:11 -0500, William J. Burlingame wrote:
>>
>>> On my System, the modem is on COM3, uses IRQ 22 and address range DF88
>>> - DF8F. COM1 uses IRQ4 and address range 3F8 - 3FF. Modern PC's
>>> aren't restricted by all the limitations imposed by IBM over 20 years
>>> ago. I seem to recall that XP supports as many as 256 COM ports. I
>>> haven't verified that number, that was one reference I read about the
>>> number.
>>
>> Are you sure about the modem using IRQ 22 or is it a typo? COM3
>>most often uses IRQ 2, and until now I haven't heard of IRQs above
>>15. More IRQs would be quite welcome though, and if true, how were
>>they implemented? The only reasonable solution I can think of would
>>add another 8 lines (IRQ16 to IRQ23) on the motherboard only, not
>>available to the PC's bus.
>
>On my system with an ASUS P4P800 Deluxe motherboard and running
>Windows XP, if right click on My Computer, select Properties - Device
>Manager - View - Resources by Type - IRQ, it show IRQ's starting at 0
>and ending at 23. As I said, the old ISA bus based on the old IBM AT
>has been enhanced considerably by the PCI bus. Motherboards with a
>still newer version of the PCI bus are about to enter the marketplace.
>With 64 bit processors available, even the PCI bus is becoming
>outdated.
>
>BTW, I forgot that my modem is not on the motherboard as I indicated
>earlier, but a card plugged into the PCI bus. It's the device that is
>using IRQ 22. I have an ethernet card plugged into the bus that is
>using IRQ 21. My NVIDIA graphics card uses IRQ 16 and my RAID
>controller uses IRQ 23. All the assignments were made with the
>system's plug and play capability.
>
>---------------------------------------------------------------
>
>bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
>amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
>to send me a message.
>
>Bill Burlingame

---------------------------------------------------------------

bs has been included as part of my e-mail address to reduce the
amount of spam mail. Change the 'bs'in my address to 'bellsouth'
to send me a message.

Bill Burlingame
June 24, 2004 7:54:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 20:44:53 -0500, William J. Burlingame wrote:

> On my system with an ASUS P4P800 Deluxe motherboard and running
> Windows XP, if right click on My Computer, select Properties - Device
> Manager - View - Resources by Type - IRQ, it show IRQ's starting at 0
> and ending at 23. As I said, the old ISA bus based on the old IBM AT
> has been enhanced considerably by the PCI bus. Motherboards with a
> still newer version of the PCI bus are about to enter the marketplace.
> With 64 bit processors available, even the PCI bus is becoming
> outdated.

Thanks for the info. Either the PCI bus has evolved, or my (not so
recent) computer's PCI bus is a bit lacking. The CMOS setup allows
ports/interrupts to be assigned to the exclusive use of either the
PCI bus or the traditional AT bus, but it doesn't show any
interrupts above 15. Of course ISA cards couldn't conflict with any
PCI interrupts above 15, but the Windows Device Manager doesn't show
any port resources above 15 either.


> Another term to look up is APIC.

Haven't had a chance to look it up, but it's probably a PIC
(Processor Interrupt Controller) or a newer version of one. The
original IBM PC used a single PIC chip which handled 8 interrupts, 0
through 7. When the AT was produced, it used two PIC chips. The
new PIC fed its interrupt request signal into the first PIC's IRQ2
input, resulting in a total of 15 (not 16) available IRQs. If
anyone here more familiar with PCI architecture wants to delve into
how it extends interrupts and doesn't mind going even further OT,
they're welcome to do so. :) 
!