Recording a Banjo - Recommendations

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks. Any
recommendations for where to position microphones?

My recording room is about 15x20 and not extremely dead (and the room
sound isn't good). I do have a couple of movable partitions that I can use
to deaden an area.

My gear is pretty basic, but I can usually get clean, accurate sounds.
Here's a quick list of what I have:
Shure KSM-44
Shure KSM-32
CAD M179
Oktava M012
A couple of dynamics (a Sennheiser and an old 57)
Aphex preamp
Computer audio interface

Any suggestions would be highly appreciated. Since many of you are
probably not familiar with my gear, just tell me what you used, and I'll
see if I can translate it to my gear (I worked in a couple of pro
studios).
53 answers Last reply
More about recording banjo recommendations
  1. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    James_Jonasson wrote:
    > I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks.
    Any
    > recommendations for where to position microphones?

    As far away as possible?


    Steve

    > My recording room is about 15x20 and not extremely dead (and the room
    > sound isn't good). I do have a couple of movable partitions that I
    can use
    > to deaden an area.
    >
    > My gear is pretty basic, but I can usually get clean, accurate
    sounds.
    > Here's a quick list of what I have:
    > Shure KSM-44
    > Shure KSM-32
    > CAD M179
    > Oktava M012
    > A couple of dynamics (a Sennheiser and an old 57)
    > Aphex preamp
    > Computer audio interface
    >
    > Any suggestions would be highly appreciated. Since many of you are
    > probably not familiar with my gear, just tell me what you used, and
    I'll
    > see if I can translate it to my gear (I worked in a couple of pro
    > studios).
  2. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "James_Jonasson" <mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com> laid this on me:

    > I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks.
    > Any recommendations for where to position microphones?
    >
    > My recording room is about 15x20 and not extremely dead (and the room
    > sound isn't good). I do have a couple of movable partitions that I can
    > use to deaden an area.
    >
    > My gear is pretty basic, but I can usually get clean, accurate sounds.
    > Here's a quick list of what I have:
    > Shure KSM-44
    > Shure KSM-32
    > CAD M179
    > Oktava M012
    > A couple of dynamics (a Sennheiser and an old 57)
    > Aphex preamp
    > Computer audio interface
    >
    > Any suggestions would be highly appreciated. Since many of you are
    > probably not familiar with my gear, just tell me what you used, and
    > I'll see if I can translate it to my gear (I worked in a couple of pro
    > studios).

    Assuming a 5 string banjo, picked with fingerpicks in the Scruggs
    style...
    Without hearing the context/song/arrangement/room/banjo/etc, it's hard
    to reccomend mics/etc, but I will say, don't rule out the 57, they can be
    great on banjo if the everything else is right. I'll leave that to your
    ears, though, I'm sure you know your gear better than anyone else here.
    The one thing about banjo that folks who aren't familiar with it miss
    is the need for space. Sometimes I walk in, and guys cram a bright n' tight
    SDC 6 inches away from the banjo, then complain about how 'pinched' the
    banjo sounds. I ususally gently reccomend backing it up, and a quality omni
    (or figure 8 if you have a great ribbon) in the right room can sound
    positively divine. I know you said your room isn't great, and the banjo will
    activate space, but if the tone sounds more 'pinched' than it does while
    listening live, back the mic up. A couple feet away is not uncommon, if you
    have to treat the room a little, so be it.
    Pointing it at the 12th fret won't get the same results as guitar.
    Don't be afraid to try pointing the mic below the player's right hand.
    Spaced pair can be great as well, but is rarely necesarry. The picks make a
    lot of clatter, even with good players. Ergo, don't point the mic at the
    picks hitting the strings, the sound comes off the head, not the strings.
    Attack is rarely a problem on banjo, go for a clear (not always totally
    clean, though..), full tone.
    Of course, none of this will matter if the banjo isn't properly set
    up. Don't know how I can help you out there, but it is important.
    Good luck.

    Sean
    --
    There is an old saying that if a million monkeys
    typed on a million keyboards for a million years,
    eventually all the works of Shakespeare would be produced.
    Now, thanks to Usenet, we know this is not true.

    seans_at_efn.org
    http://www.efn.org/~seans
  3. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Sean S wrote:
    > There is an old saying that if a million monkeys
    > typed on a million keyboards for a million years,
    > eventually all the works of Shakespeare would be produced.
    > Now, thanks to Usenet, we know this is not true.

    It's only been about ten years. 20 if you push it. So give it a little
    time. Yeah I know there's more than a million monkeys.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "James_Jonasson" <mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com> wrote in message
    news:0f33da679577d819900d8d3d60686a8e@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com...

    > My gear is pretty basic, but I can usually get clean, accurate sounds.
    > Here's a quick list of what I have:
    > Shure KSM-44
    > Shure KSM-32
    > CAD M179
    > Oktava M012
    > A couple of dynamics (a Sennheiser and an old 57)
    > Aphex preamp
    > Computer audio interface

    A clean Oktava can do a surprisingly good job. Is this a bluegrass
    fingerpicked banjo or an old-time (open-backed) clawhammer banjo? If you
    have multiple capsules for the Oktava, try the hypercardioid, particularly
    if your banjo is bluegrass (the hyper is a little softer on top). The Shure
    KSM's are also possibilities, but I'd try the Oktava first; banjos and small
    diaphragms seem to go well together. Don't use any of the "drive" stuff on
    the Aphex. In that room, don't get too far away.

    Peace,
    Paul
  5. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    One thing that seems to be missing here, apart from the recommendation to experiment, is that you
    should be willing to test things out.

    Do this:

    Set up all these mics in a kind of semi circle in front of where the banjo player will stand/sit,
    assuming you have the channels on your console available to do so, and then crank them up and listen
    to the sound. It won't be "accurate", but it will give you a side by side comparison in real time
    and help you to determine which mics to eliminate from further testing.

    Second, move the mics around, one at a time, of course, to find the "sweet spot" for each microphone
    on a given instrument/voice. If you have a helper, this can be done very quickly (assuming, too,
    they understand the concept of mic placement). You can then tell them to stop when you hit that
    spot. Mark it for that mic. Move on to the next mic, leaving that mic in the spot (if possible).
    When two mic occupy the same space as the spot, then you'll have to adjust to the situation.

    However, this will do a couple things for you. First, it will help you to gain a greater
    understanding of your microphones and second, it will help you learn more about mic placement and
    third, you will learn that banjos just don't like being recorded... it's evidence against them!! ;)

    Seriously, though, when you buy a new mic, one you don't quite understand, spend time with it and
    learn about what it can do for you. If you have a good store rep, they may even let you take it home
    to test before purchasing.

    When I was demo'ing some mic pres, I hooked them up and recorded a guitar track and a vocal track
    for each mic pre. I did this "side by side" on the multitrack so i could punch between the tracks to
    hear the printed sound they made. I used two different mics, one LDC and one dynamic. So I ran two
    separate tests for each pre, one for condenser, one for dynamic as a base line.

    Now I could hear what the pres were doing to the instrument and voice, the differences between them,
    within a few seconds. It helped me to hear which pre was good for guitar/instruments and which was
    good for vocals and what mic type worked with a given pre. It's not the most discriminating test,
    but your ears are the best tool you have, really.

    It took time to set up the comparison test, but I had a printed record of their performance for
    future reference, too. And I got to play with some really expensive pres, too. The gear guy at the
    place I frequented at the time was really cool about letting me take stuff home to demo it before
    deciding to buy or not. Gotta love that!

    --fletch


    James_Jonasson wrote:
    > I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks. Any
    > recommendations for where to position microphones?
    >
    > My recording room is about 15x20 and not extremely dead (and the room
    > sound isn't good). I do have a couple of movable partitions that I can use
    > to deaden an area.
    >
    > My gear is pretty basic, but I can usually get clean, accurate sounds.
    > Here's a quick list of what I have:
    > Shure KSM-44
    > Shure KSM-32
    > CAD M179
    > Oktava M012
    > A couple of dynamics (a Sennheiser and an old 57)
    > Aphex preamp
    > Computer audio interface
    >
    > Any suggestions would be highly appreciated. Since many of you are
    > probably not familiar with my gear, just tell me what you used, and I'll
    > see if I can translate it to my gear (I worked in a couple of pro
    > studios).
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <0f33da679577d819900d8d3d60686a8e@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com> mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com writes:

    > I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks. Any
    > recommendations for where to position microphones?

    Ask the banjo player. It's hard to go wrong with your KSM-44 about a
    foot and a half in front of the banjo as a starting point.


    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
  7. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article
    <0f33da679577d819900d8d3d60686a8e@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com>,
    "James_Jonasson" <mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com> wrote:

    > I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks. Any
    > recommendations for where to position microphones?
    >
    > My recording room is about 15x20 and not extremely dead (and the room
    > sound isn't good). I do have a couple of movable partitions that I can use
    > to deaden an area.
    >
    > My gear is pretty basic, but I can usually get clean, accurate sounds.
    > Here's a quick list of what I have:
    > Shure KSM-44
    > Shure KSM-32
    > CAD M179
    > Oktava M012
    > A couple of dynamics (a Sennheiser and an old 57)
    > Aphex preamp
    > Computer audio interface
    >
    > Any suggestions would be highly appreciated. Since many of you are
    > probably not familiar with my gear, just tell me what you used, and I'll
    > see if I can translate it to my gear (I worked in a couple of pro
    > studios).

    Experiment, experiment, experiment. I've recorded a lot of banjo stuff,
    and one thing I've learned is that every banjo is different (much more
    so than guitars). Even a player's style can change what you'll choose as
    your mic/performer position. Use the finger in one ear trick to start
    you off, but don't be afraid to try positions that seem unreasonable.
    You might be pleasantly surprised.

    Phil

    --
    Phil Oliver
    Aardvark Graphics & Sound
    remove _removespam for email replies
  8. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Thank you all for the comments (especially the ones containing suggestions
    about how to approach this). If I ever need recommendations again, I'll
    remember to include the style and more info about the instrument.

    In this case, the player is phenomenal. He is using a beat up banjo
    (closed back, I believe). The sound is a little mushy, so I'll probably
    start with the Oktava for the extra high end. The song style is folk and
    the banjo part is kind of like old time country (uptempo).

    Thanks again to all.
  9. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    James_Jonasson Wrote:
    > I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks.
    > Any
    > recommendations for where to position microphones?

    A ribbon mic somewhere in front of the instrument usually works pretty
    well... it's really not that hard a sound to record.


    --
    Fletcher
  10. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    A KSM32 is my mic of choice for banjo, and you just happen to have
    one...
  11. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    <sstevelp@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:1109730428.288825.37950@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > James_Jonasson wrote:
    >> I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks.
    > Any
    >> recommendations for where to position microphones?
    >
    > As far away as possible?

    Director: "How far can you pull back?"
    Engineer: "How do you feel about Cleveland?".
  12. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Take the largest, heaviest mic, and put in on a stand about five feet above
    the banjo in a broken clip. Play lots of kick drum tracks loudly in the
    same room, and hopefully the problem will be solved. ;>)

    I just hope for your sake you don't have any bagpipe sessions that need
    discussion here. ;>)

    As always, and seriously this time, experiment. A good condensor, and I'd
    think a spot with lots of diffuse early reflections nearby would help. A
    distinct reflection or two getting in the pickup of the mic field might be
    disasterous, and I think the banjo needs some liveness right around it to
    sound good.

    Best regards,

    John
  13. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
    news:znr1109766894k@trad...
    >
    > In article <0f33da679577d819900d8d3d60686a8e@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com>
    mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com writes:
    >
    > > I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks.
    Any
    > > recommendations for where to position microphones?
    >
    > Ask the banjo player. It's hard to go wrong with your KSM-44 about a
    > foot and a half in front of the banjo as a starting point.
    >
    Given what you have to work with, I'd go along with what Mike said. I
    average recording banjo on 5 or 6 tracks a month' I usually use a THE mic
    with a 25mm capsule if I'm setting up a mic just for the banjo (my banjo
    player usually doubles on mandolin), and often use a Gefell M592 (which I
    usually use for mandolin anyway) for the banjo.

    Fletcher's suggestion about using a ribbon works great, but it's more of an
    'old fashioned' banjo sound, not the type of sound I'm hearing on the radio
    these days (underneath country and some americana tracks).

    --
    Dave Martin
    DMA, Inc
    Nashville, TN
  14. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <07e03d265a5e4b77bea308b528a513f9@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com> mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com writes:

    > Thank you all for the comments (especially the ones containing suggestions
    > about how to approach this). If I ever need recommendations again, I'll
    > remember to include the style and more info about the instrument.

    James, all the advice given here is the same no matter what the
    instrument is. It all boils down to put up a mic, listen to what you
    get out of it, and if you're not happy, change something. It's not
    that hard, and there isn't much that comes out of a banjo in any
    direction that doesn't sound like a banjo.

    One thing that I don't think has been mentioned is the context. If
    this is solo banjo, that's one thing. If, as I recall, you're adding
    a banjo track to a song, the sound of the banjo has to fit in with the
    song. Don't be afraid to adjust the EQ accordingly.

    > He is using a beat up banjo
    > (closed back, I believe). The sound is a little mushy, so I'll probably
    > start with the Oktava for the extra high end.

    A mic that has a high end boost isn't going going to put something
    there that doesn't come out of the banjo. Most old time music is
    played on an open back banjo (some of them are indeed beat up).
    Hopefully the player knows what he's going to record, or you've chosen
    the right player for your track.

    I don't mean to oversimplfy this. I play old time banjo myself.
    Players who are into the sound, like players of any other instrument,
    get the sound from the instrument and their technique, not from what
    someone does in the studio. Players like Dan Gellert (who shows up
    here occasionally) have a bunch of banjos and take the time to find
    the best way to record the subtle differences between them because
    that's what's important to them and why they choose to play a
    particular banjo on a certain song.

    But if all you want is a banjo track, put up a mic and start rolling.
    If what the player is giving you is good, you can hardly miss. If it's
    not, there's nothing you can do with a mic that will make it right.


    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
  15. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On 2 Mar 2005 18:06:03 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:

    >
    >In article <07e03d265a5e4b77bea308b528a513f9@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com> mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com writes:
    >
    >> Thank you all for the comments (especially the ones containing suggestions
    >> about how to approach this). If I ever need recommendations again, I'll
    >> remember to include the style and more info about the instrument.
    >
    >James, all the advice given here is the same no matter what the
    >instrument is. It all boils down to put up a mic, listen to what you
    >get out of it, and if you're not happy, change something. It's not
    >that hard, and there isn't much that comes out of a banjo in any
    >direction that doesn't sound like a banjo.
    >
    >One thing that I don't think has been mentioned is the context. If
    >this is solo banjo, that's one thing. If, as I recall, you're adding
    >a banjo track to a song, the sound of the banjo has to fit in with the
    >song. Don't be afraid to adjust the EQ accordingly.
    >
    >> He is using a beat up banjo
    >> (closed back, I believe). The sound is a little mushy, so I'll probably
    >> start with the Oktava for the extra high end.
    >
    >A mic that has a high end boost isn't going going to put something
    >there that doesn't come out of the banjo. Most old time music is
    >played on an open back banjo (some of them are indeed beat up).
    >Hopefully the player knows what he's going to record, or you've chosen
    >the right player for your track.
    >
    >I don't mean to oversimplfy this. I play old time banjo myself.
    >Players who are into the sound, like players of any other instrument,
    >get the sound from the instrument and their technique, not from what
    >someone does in the studio. Players like Dan Gellert (who shows up
    >here occasionally) have a bunch of banjos and take the time to find
    >the best way to record the subtle differences between them because
    >that's what's important to them and why they choose to play a
    >particular banjo on a certain song.
    >
    >But if all you want is a banjo track, put up a mic and start rolling.
    >If what the player is giving you is good, you can hardly miss. If it's
    >not, there's nothing you can do with a mic that will make it right.

    There are also things you can do to the banjo itself to change the
    sound, such as changing head tension, different bridges, etc. If the
    player is on the inexperienced side, they may not be aware of how
    these adjustments can affect the sound.

    Al
  16. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "James_Jonasson" <mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com> wrote in message
    news:07e03d265a5e4b77bea308b528a513f9@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com...
    > Thank you all for the comments (especially the ones containing suggestions
    > about how to approach this). If I ever need recommendations again, I'll
    > remember to include the style and more info about the instrument.
    >
    > In this case, the player is phenomenal. He is using a beat up banjo
    > (closed back, I believe). The sound is a little mushy, so I'll probably
    > start with the Oktava for the extra high end. The song style is folk and
    > the banjo part is kind of like old time country (uptempo).
    >
    > Thanks again to all.
    >


    I find that high end is never lacking on the vast majority of banjos
    that I've recorded or miked in a live situation. In the style you are
    looking at here, I would take a dynamic, like an RE-20, at about a
    foot out and just north of or right below the picking hand. Sometimes
    too much detail on a banjo (depending on the player) makes the
    instrument a little tough to listen to. The raw instrument may sound
    mushy to your ears right now, but a condenser will hear things quite
    a bit differently.

    --
    David Morgan (MAMS)
    http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com
    Morgan Audio Media Service
    Dallas, Texas (214) 662-9901
    _______________________________________
    http://www.artisan-recordingstudio.com
  17. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <0f33da679577d819900d8d3d60686a8e@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com>,
    James_Jonasson <mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com> wrote:

    >I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks. Any
    >recommendations for where to position microphones?

    Strummed, plucked, or fingerpicked?

    (I half expect to read posts from the guy who records Bela Fleck
    or Kang now).
  18. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "james" <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote in message
    news:iwpVd.1938$8k2.487@fed1read03...
    > In article
    <0f33da679577d819900d8d3d60686a8e@localhost.talkaboutaudio.com>,
    > James_Jonasson <mail@jamesjonasson-nospam-.com> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm going to be adding a banjo to a song in the next couple of weeks. Any
    > >recommendations for where to position microphones?
    >
    > Strummed, plucked, or fingerpicked?
    >
    > (I half expect to read posts from the guy who records Bela Fleck
    > or Kang now).
    >
    Bil Vorndick doesn't hang around here...

    --
    Dave Martin
    DMA, Inc
    Nashville, TN
  19. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Phil Oliver wrote:

    > so than guitars). Even a player's style can change what you'll choose as
    > your mic/performer position. Use the finger in one ear trick to start
    > you off, but don't be afraid to try positions that seem unreasonable.
    > You might be pleasantly surprised.


    For an example:

    http://www.nvrsk.net/~dexter/funpics/misc/banjo.jpg
  20. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    87 in omni. Great mic pre. And don't get too close.


    David Correia
    Celebration Sound
    Warren, Rhode Island

    CelebrationSound@aol.com
    www.CelebrationSound.com
  21. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <2pjc219pbe93ce076qr9vjb35u7fonai1t@4ax.com> playonAT@comcast.net writes:

    > There are also things you can do to the banjo itself to change the
    > sound, such as changing head tension, different bridges, etc. If the
    > player is on the inexperienced side, they may not be aware of how
    > these adjustments can affect the sound.

    Same with drums, same with guitars (and amps), same with just about
    any instruments. You can regulate a piano differently for different
    kinds of music and for different players. You can use a different reed
    or mouthpiece. You can use a different kind of pick.

    The bottom line is that the guy has a banjo player coming over. He's
    not sure what to expect. He should put a mic in front of the banjo and
    record something.


    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
  22. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On 3 Mar 2005 10:15:11 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:

    >
    >In article <2pjc219pbe93ce076qr9vjb35u7fonai1t@4ax.com> playonAT@comcast.net writes:
    >
    >> There are also things you can do to the banjo itself to change the
    >> sound, such as changing head tension, different bridges, etc. If the
    >> player is on the inexperienced side, they may not be aware of how
    >> these adjustments can affect the sound.
    >
    >Same with drums, same with guitars (and amps), same with just about
    >any instruments. You can regulate a piano differently for different
    >kinds of music and for different players. You can use a different reed
    >or mouthpiece. You can use a different kind of pick.
    >
    >The bottom line is that the guy has a banjo player coming over. He's
    >not sure what to expect. He should put a mic in front of the banjo and
    >record something.

    Agreed... banjo would be pretty low on the list of stringed
    instruments that are difficult to record.

    Al
  23. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "david" <ihate@spamo.com> wrote in message...
    >
    > 87 in omni. Great mic pre. And don't get too close.


    But the only place I have left to put him is in the bathroom....

    ;-)

    --
    David Morgan (MAMS)
    http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com


    > David Correia
    > Celebration Sound
    > Warren, Rhode Island
    >
    > CelebrationSound@aol.com
    > www.CelebrationSound.com
  24. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <C2IVd.74124$uc.33913@trnddc04>, MAMS\
    <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote:

    > "david" <ihate@spamo.com> wrote in message...
    > >
    > > 87 in omni. Great mic pre. And don't get too close.
    >
    >
    > But the only place I have left to put him is in the bathroom....
    >
    > ;-)


    In my first building which was a much smaller space than what I have
    now, I'd use the bathroom for the guitar amp during basic tracks.
    Sounded great, except during a break when it was time for someone to
    pee. And flush. Would always slay everyone in the control room when I
    slipped the multitrack out of record safe.

    It's only a teenage wasteland.


    David Correia
    Celebration Sound
    Warren, Rhode Island

    CelebrationSound@aol.com
    www.CelebrationSound.com
  25. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Mike Rivers wrote:

    > I wouldn not recommend that anyone, based on advice here, purchase a
    > special mic or preamp just to record a banjo.

    I would recommend that anyone reading here who doesn't already have a
    banjo just go buy a special one for use with their mics.

    --
    ha
  26. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
    news:1gsz19p.z0o43t1ww1ok1N%walkinay@thegrid.net...
    > Mike Rivers wrote:
    >
    > > I wouldn not recommend that anyone, based on advice here, purchase a
    > > special mic or preamp just to record a banjo.
    >
    > I would recommend that anyone reading here who doesn't already have a
    > banjo just go buy a special one for use with their mics.

    What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?

    --
    Dave Martin
    DMA, Inc
    Nashville, TN
  27. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 06:32:07 GMT, "Dave Martin" <dmainc@earthlink.net>
    wrote:

    >
    >"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
    >news:1gsz19p.z0o43t1ww1ok1N%walkinay@thegrid.net...
    >> Mike Rivers wrote:
    >>
    >> > I wouldn not recommend that anyone, based on advice here, purchase a
    >> > special mic or preamp just to record a banjo.
    >>
    >> I would recommend that anyone reading here who doesn't already have a
    >> banjo just go buy a special one for use with their mics.
    >
    >What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?

    One with 5 strings.

    Al
  28. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Dave Martin" <dmainc@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:HtxWd.3118$CW2.667@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >
    > "hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
    > news:1gsz19p.z0o43t1ww1ok1N%walkinay@thegrid.net...
    > > Mike Rivers wrote:
    > >
    > > > I wouldn not recommend that anyone, based on advice here, purchase a
    > > > special mic or preamp just to record a banjo.
    > >
    > > I would recommend that anyone reading here who doesn't already have a
    > > banjo just go buy a special one for use with their mics.
    >
    > What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?


    How much do you want to spend?
  29. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
    news:7IxWd.72072$Dc.51147@trnddc06...
    > >
    > > What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?
    >
    >
    > How much do you want to spend?
    >
    Under $100, of course. But you didn't ask what kinda music I was gonna be
    recording...

    --
    Dave Martin
    DMA, Inc
    Nashville, TN
  30. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Dave Martin wrote:

    > "David Morgan (MAMS)" wrote...

    > > > What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?

    > > How much do you want to spend?

    > Under $100, of course. But you didn't ask what kinda music I was gonna be
    > recording...

    Banjo music, silly. Apparently cheap banjo music.

    --
    ha
  31. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "play on" <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:agel211ptkd39e3gu3pamprnuv02tv3dgi@4ax.com...

    > >What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?
    >
    > One with 5 strings.
    >
    Damn - the tenor banjo's gonna have to stay in the closet. (Actually, that's
    not a bad idea in any case except a Dixieland band...)

    --
    Dave Martin
    DMA, Inc
    Nashville, TN
  32. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
    news:1gsz5hm.85tbo46ttcakN%walkinay@thegrid.net...

    > Banjo music, silly. Apparently cheap banjo music.
    >
    I once asked the banjo player with the Nitty Gritty Dirt band why he had
    paid $10K for his latest Gibson banjo (He'd just bought a pre-war Master
    Tone, and had mentioned the price on a TV show). I said, "It's still gonna
    sound like a banjo, isn't it?"

    The sort of behavior that's kept me where I am today...

    --
    Dave Martin
    DMA, Inc
    Nashville, TN
  33. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 17:54:35 GMT, "Dave Martin" <dmainc@earthlink.net>
    wrote:

    >"play on" <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >news:agel211ptkd39e3gu3pamprnuv02tv3dgi@4ax.com...
    >
    >> >What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?
    >>
    >> One with 5 strings.
    >>
    >Damn - the tenor banjo's gonna have to stay in the closet. (Actually, that's
    >not a bad idea in any case except a Dixieland band...)

    And even then...

    Al
  34. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Dave Martin wrote:

    > "hank alrich" wrote...

    > > Banjo music, silly. Apparently cheap banjo music.

    > I once asked the banjo player with the Nitty Gritty Dirt band why he had
    > paid $10K for his latest Gibson banjo (He'd just bought a pre-war Master
    > Tone, and had mentioned the price on a TV show). I said, "It's still gonna
    > sound like a banjo, isn't it?"

    > The sort of behavior that's kept me where I am today...

    A friend of mine fairly recently bought a special Stelling that has some
    fine woods that were recovered from a shipwreck in one of the the Great
    Lakes. It's a wonderful instrument, but cost several pretty pennies, and
    the guy's an early-intermediate player. I suggested fancy woods might
    has less to do with banjo sound than might be the case with guitars or
    violins. He said, "Tony Trischka disagrees with you". I resisted saying,
    "You're not Tony Trischka".

    This all said, I have a confession to make. A few weeks ago I traded a
    1934 Epiphone Triumph for a 1918 Gibson tenor banjo prototype. I have
    never played nor previously wanted to play tenor banjo. But the first
    time I laid eyes on this thing, several years ago, my sad excuse for a
    mind went, "I want that thing; I wnt to play that thing". And it's
    pretty damned cool sounding and looking. No tone ring, in the "modern"
    sense, but the rim is a wood channel with the inner circle raised to
    effectively make a wooden tone ring. So now we have a whole 'nother kind
    of banjo sound around the secret mountain.

    (Please don't tell Harvey, because he'll just make fun of me.)

    --
    ha
  35. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich) wrote:

    >Dave Martin wrote:
    >
    >> "hank alrich" wrote...
    >
    >> > Banjo music, silly. Apparently cheap banjo music.
    >
    >> I once asked the banjo player with the Nitty Gritty Dirt band why he had
    >> paid $10K for his latest Gibson banjo (He'd just bought a pre-war Master
    >> Tone, and had mentioned the price on a TV show). I said, "It's still gonna
    >> sound like a banjo, isn't it?"
    >
    >> The sort of behavior that's kept me where I am today...
    >
    >A friend of mine fairly recently bought a special Stelling that has some
    >fine woods that were recovered from a shipwreck in one of the the Great
    >Lakes. It's a wonderful instrument, but cost several pretty pennies, and
    >the guy's an early-intermediate player. I suggested fancy woods might
    >has less to do with banjo sound than might be the case with guitars or
    >violins. He said, "Tony Trischka disagrees with you". I resisted saying,
    >"You're not Tony Trischka".
    >
    >This all said, I have a confession to make. A few weeks ago I traded a
    >1934 Epiphone Triumph for a 1918 Gibson tenor banjo prototype. I have
    >never played nor previously wanted to play tenor banjo. But the first
    >time I laid eyes on this thing, several years ago, my sad excuse for a
    >mind went, "I want that thing; I wnt to play that thing". And it's
    >pretty damned cool sounding and looking. No tone ring, in the "modern"
    >sense, but the rim is a wood channel with the inner circle raised to
    >effectively make a wooden tone ring. So now we have a whole 'nother kind
    >of banjo sound around the secret mountain.
    >
    >(Please don't tell Harvey, because he'll just make fun of me.)

    Too late, I follow ALL banjo threads!! Actually, I miss my old long
    neck "Pete Seeger" style banjo (that was stolen in the 60's). It's just
    too damn hard to get people to make left-handed 5 string banjos or I'd
    still have one. And now, for those times when a string breaks:

    Q: How many banjo players does it take to cover "Dear Old Dixie"?
    A: Evidently all of them.

    A bluegrass band is playing a New Years's eve gig at a local club. The
    place is packed and everybody is absolutely loving the music. Shortly
    after midnight, the club owner comes up to them and says, "You guys
    sound great. Everybody loves you. I'd like to know if you can come back
    here next New Year's eve to play?" The band look at each other then to
    the club owner, and the banjo player says "Sure, we'd love to. Is it OK
    if we leave our stuff here?"

    Q: What do you call a beautiful woman on a banjo player's arm?
    A: A tattoo.

    Q: How many banjo players does it take to pave a driveway?
    A: Seven - if you lay them out correctly.

    Banjo Player: "Did you hear our last album?"
    Friend: "I certainly hope so."

    Q: What do you do if you see a bleeding banjo player running around in
    your back yard?
    A: Stop laughing and shoot again.

    Q: What do you do if you run over a banjo player?
    A: Back up.

    Q: How do you get a banjo player out of a tree?
    A: Cut the noose.


    Q: What's the difference between a female banjo player and a hockey
    player?
    A: A hockey player showers after three periods.

    Harvey Gerst
    Indian Trail Recording Studio
    http://www.ITRstudio.com/
  36. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 19:05:51 GMT, walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich)
    wrote:

    >A few weeks ago I traded a
    >1934 Epiphone Triumph for a 1918 Gibson tenor banjo prototype.

    Someone got a good deal!

    Al
  37. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Q: What's the definition of perfect pitch?

    A: It's when you toss the accordian into the dumpster and it lands
    exactly on top of the banjo.

    Al


    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 15:35:08 -0600, Harvey Gerst
    <harvey@ITRstudio.com> wrote:

    >walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich) wrote:
    >
    >>Dave Martin wrote:
    >>
    >>> "hank alrich" wrote...
    >>
    >>> > Banjo music, silly. Apparently cheap banjo music.
    >>
    >>> I once asked the banjo player with the Nitty Gritty Dirt band why he had
    >>> paid $10K for his latest Gibson banjo (He'd just bought a pre-war Master
    >>> Tone, and had mentioned the price on a TV show). I said, "It's still gonna
    >>> sound like a banjo, isn't it?"
    >>
    >>> The sort of behavior that's kept me where I am today...
    >>
    >>A friend of mine fairly recently bought a special Stelling that has some
    >>fine woods that were recovered from a shipwreck in one of the the Great
    >>Lakes. It's a wonderful instrument, but cost several pretty pennies, and
    >>the guy's an early-intermediate player. I suggested fancy woods might
    >>has less to do with banjo sound than might be the case with guitars or
    >>violins. He said, "Tony Trischka disagrees with you". I resisted saying,
    >>"You're not Tony Trischka".
    >>
    >>This all said, I have a confession to make. A few weeks ago I traded a
    >>1934 Epiphone Triumph for a 1918 Gibson tenor banjo prototype. I have
    >>never played nor previously wanted to play tenor banjo. But the first
    >>time I laid eyes on this thing, several years ago, my sad excuse for a
    >>mind went, "I want that thing; I wnt to play that thing". And it's
    >>pretty damned cool sounding and looking. No tone ring, in the "modern"
    >>sense, but the rim is a wood channel with the inner circle raised to
    >>effectively make a wooden tone ring. So now we have a whole 'nother kind
    >>of banjo sound around the secret mountain.
    >>
    >>(Please don't tell Harvey, because he'll just make fun of me.)
    >
    >Too late, I follow ALL banjo threads!! Actually, I miss my old long
    >neck "Pete Seeger" style banjo (that was stolen in the 60's). It's just
    >too damn hard to get people to make left-handed 5 string banjos or I'd
    >still have one. And now, for those times when a string breaks:
    >
    >Q: How many banjo players does it take to cover "Dear Old Dixie"?
    >A: Evidently all of them.
    >
    >A bluegrass band is playing a New Years's eve gig at a local club. The
    >place is packed and everybody is absolutely loving the music. Shortly
    >after midnight, the club owner comes up to them and says, "You guys
    >sound great. Everybody loves you. I'd like to know if you can come back
    >here next New Year's eve to play?" The band look at each other then to
    >the club owner, and the banjo player says "Sure, we'd love to. Is it OK
    >if we leave our stuff here?"
    >
    >Q: What do you call a beautiful woman on a banjo player's arm?
    >A: A tattoo.
    >
    >Q: How many banjo players does it take to pave a driveway?
    >A: Seven - if you lay them out correctly.
    >
    >Banjo Player: "Did you hear our last album?"
    >Friend: "I certainly hope so."
    >
    >Q: What do you do if you see a bleeding banjo player running around in
    >your back yard?
    >A: Stop laughing and shoot again.
    >
    >Q: What do you do if you run over a banjo player?
    >A: Back up.
    >
    >Q: How do you get a banjo player out of a tree?
    >A: Cut the noose.
    >
    >
    >Q: What's the difference between a female banjo player and a hockey
    >player?
    >A: A hockey player showers after three periods.
    >
    >Harvey Gerst
    >Indian Trail Recording Studio
    >http://www.ITRstudio.com/
  38. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Harvey Gerst wrote:
    >
    > Too late, I follow ALL banjo threads!! Actually, I miss my old long
    > neck "Pete Seeger" style banjo (that was stolen in the 60's). It's just
    > too damn hard to get people to make left-handed 5 string banjos or I'd
    > still have one. And now, for those times when a string breaks:

    Q: How can you tell when your stage is level?
    A: Your banjo player is drooling out of both sides of his mouth.

    (Thanks to U. Utah Phillips)
  39. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Dave Martin wrote:

    > "play on" wrote...

    > > >What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?

    > > One with 5 strings.

    > Damn - the tenor banjo's gonna have to stay in the closet. (Actually, that's
    > not a bad idea in any case except a Dixieland band...)

    I just posted elsewhere in this thread about my new tenor. When I played
    it for a friend of mine they remarked that it'd make a very good Celtic
    banjo. Be very afraid.

    --
    ha
  40. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Dave Martin wrote:

    >>I would recommend that anyone reading here who doesn't already have a
    >>banjo just go buy a special one for use with their mics.
    >
    >
    > What's the best banjo to use with an Sm57?
    >

    One without strings?? :-)
  41. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 19:08:38 GMT, walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich)
    wrote:

    >I just posted elsewhere in this thread about my new tenor. When I played
    >it for a friend of mine they remarked that it'd make a very good Celtic
    >banjo. Be very afraid.

    I have a 1924 Gibson trapdoor tenor. It has the shortest neck I'd ever
    seen on a tenor. I have used this still of short neck tenor for 20
    years playing mostly in a Celtic style even though it is in normal
    tuning. That is to say I mostly use it for melody though occasional
    clone the dixie style of strumming for the odd tune. The Irish tenor
    thing is to tune it like an octave lower mandolin. I recently did that
    with this one for a recording and it worked out fine. This renders the
    instrument useless for chording.
  42. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
    news:1gt015g.ijnf4x1glzkzrN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
    So now we have a whole 'nother kind
    > of banjo sound around the secret mountain.
    >
    And if you're playing a tenor banjo up there, it's another reason for the
    mountain to remain secret...

    But congratuations! It's always fun getting a new instrument. The lastest
    one here at Java Jive is a 1970's Johnny Smith that plays FAR better than a
    70's era Gibson should.

    --
    Dave Martin
    DMA, Inc
    Nashville, TN
  43. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    play on wrote:

    > hank alrich wrote:

    > >A few weeks ago I traded a
    > >1934 Epiphone Triumph for a 1918 Gibson tenor banjo prototype.

    > Someone got a good deal!

    All depends what I like. <g>

    Turned out the Epi needed dovetail work, and I hadn't been playing it.

    Now, a buddy with whom I play just got a 1940 Epi Emperor in lovely
    condition with amazing sound, that has had an interesting music career
    of its own. Man, what a guitar.

    --
    ha
  44. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    paul wrote:

    > I have a 1924 Gibson trapdoor tenor. It has the shortest neck I'd ever
    > seen on a tenor. I have used this still of short neck tenor for 20
    > years playing mostly in a Celtic style even though it is in normal
    > tuning.

    What's "normal tuning" to you? Like guitar top four strings? E, B, G, D?

    > That is to say I mostly use it for melody though occasional
    > clone the dixie style of strumming for the odd tune. The Irish tenor
    > thing is to tune it like an octave lower mandolin. I recently did that
    > with this one for a recording and it worked out fine. This renders the
    > instrument useless for chording.

    I have this one tuned like a viola. Wallah! And yes, chord are a
    stretch.

    --
    ha
  45. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 23:00:47 GMT, walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich)
    wrote:

    >play on wrote:
    >
    >> hank alrich wrote:
    >
    >> >A few weeks ago I traded a
    >> >1934 Epiphone Triumph for a 1918 Gibson tenor banjo prototype.
    >
    >> Someone got a good deal!
    >
    >All depends what I like. <g>
    >
    >Turned out the Epi needed dovetail work, and I hadn't been playing it.
    >
    >Now, a buddy with whom I play just got a 1940 Epi Emperor in lovely
    >condition with amazing sound, that has had an interesting music career
    >of its own. Man, what a guitar.

    Yeah Epiphones can be great guitars... I don't own one though.

    Al
  46. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    <paul@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:herm21l1a68d4qp3c2g3q1q26js89akilh@4ax.com...

    > I have a 1924 Gibson trapdoor tenor. It has the shortest neck I'd ever
    > seen on a tenor. I have used this still of short neck tenor for 20
    > years playing mostly in a Celtic style even though it is in normal
    > tuning. That is to say I mostly use it for melody though occasional
    > clone the dixie style of strumming for the odd tune. The Irish tenor
    > thing is to tune it like an octave lower mandolin. I recently did that
    > with this one for a recording and it worked out fine. This renders the
    > instrument useless for chording.

    Why? Mandolin players chord.

    Peace,
    Paul
  47. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 23:11:04 GMT, "Paul Stamler"
    <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote:

    >
    ><paul@nospam.net> wrote in message
    >news:herm21l1a68d4qp3c2g3q1q26js89akilh@4ax.com...
    >
    >> I have a 1924 Gibson trapdoor tenor. It has the shortest neck I'd ever
    >> seen on a tenor. I have used this still of short neck tenor for 20
    >> years playing mostly in a Celtic style even though it is in normal
    >> tuning. That is to say I mostly use it for melody though occasional
    >> clone the dixie style of strumming for the odd tune. The Irish tenor
    >> thing is to tune it like an octave lower mandolin. I recently did that
    >> with this one for a recording and it worked out fine. This renders the
    >> instrument useless for chording.
    >
    >Why? Mandolin players chord.

    Yes but Mandos have a tiny short scale lenght. With bigger
    instruments it would become quite a stretch.

    Al
  48. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "play on" <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:rban21h1bl1okd1litd7gofs956ifhcvso@4ax.com...
    > >
    > >Why? Mandolin players chord.
    >
    > Yes but Mandos have a tiny short scale lenght. With bigger
    > instruments it would become quite a stretch.
    >
    Well, mandocello, bouzouki and mandola are a pretty good stretch too, but
    doable....

    --
    Dave Martin
    DMA, Inc
    Nashville, TN
  49. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 23:00:48 GMT, walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich)
    wrote:

    >What's "normal tuning" to you? Like guitar top four strings? E, B, G, D?
    >
    No it is as you say below viola tuning. The Irish tenor is a 4th
    below.
    >
    >I have this one tuned like a viola. Wallah! And yes, chord are a
    >stretch.

    Since I played Mando first and have huge hands it's doable for me, but
    as I mentioned I rarely use it for chording.
    I've done a load of Kids shows and albums and the banjo is always a
    nice happy sound. Hard to sound sad or angry on a banjo.
Ask a new question

Read More

Pro Audio Audio