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Sony's New - Sound Forge 8

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Anonymous
March 2, 2005 3:41:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Has anyone used the new Sound Forge 8? The program
now supports 32 bit/192... but why would anyone record
in 32 bit, for what purpose? I also see Sony finally
included CD Text in the CD Architect program.

More about : sony sound forge

Anonymous
March 2, 2005 10:14:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Powell wrote:
> Has anyone used the new Sound Forge 8? The program
> now supports 32 bit/192...

This isn't new. Sound Forge 6 already supported 64 Bit float recording
and sampling rates of 192 KHz.

Johann
--
Im Übrigen, was soll das immer mit den Realnamen. Wer noch glaubt er
würde sich im Internet anonym bewegen können, tut mir ehrllich leid.
("Shin" in <9rpk0t$uv9v6$1@ID-113653.news.dfncis.de>)
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 10:14:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Johann Burkard" wrote

> > Has anyone used the new Sound Forge 8? The program
> > now supports 32 bit/192...
>
> This isn't new. Sound Forge 6 already supported 64 Bit
> float recording and sampling rates of 192 KHz.
>
Ok. What's the difference between 32bit and 64 bit
*float*? And in what practical application does one
utilize the extra bits above 24 bits for?
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Anonymous
March 3, 2005 4:26:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Powell wrote:

> And in what practical application does one
> utilize the extra bits above 24 bits for?

IIRC for about 1/1000 of a second of so.


PapaNate
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 7:07:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Powell wrote:

> And in what practical application does one
> utilize the extra bits above 24 bits for?

IIRC for about 1/1000 of a second of so.


PapaNate
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 7:10:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Powell wrote:

> And in what practical application does one
> utilize the extra bits above 24 bits for?

IIRC for about 1/1000 of a second of so.


PapaNate
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 8:48:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Powell wrote:

> "Johann Burkard" wrote

> > > Has anyone used the new Sound Forge 8? The program
> > > now supports 32 bit/192...

> > This isn't new. Sound Forge 6 already supported 64 Bit
> > float recording and sampling rates of 192 KHz.

> Ok. What's the difference between 32bit and 64 bit
> *float*? And in what practical application does one
> utilize the extra bits above 24 bits for?

Marketing.

--
ha
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 6:58:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Ok. What's the difference between 32bit and 64 bit
> *float*? And in what practical application does one
> utilize the extra bits above 24 bits for?

Well, as the new processors process in 64 bit, its natural to follow up on
this, and it will make your final results better.. its not just a marketing
trick..
CPU's handle types of numbers different. With floating point ("float") then
code uses numbers like 1.12352, and uses whole different approach to the
different calculations (e.g. division is much more precise in float
formats). But these kinds of calculations is mostly much more heavy
computationalwise.. so many programs uses fixed integer math instead, which
do not sacrifice much prescision but gives a huge speedup.. but this is not
as intuitive as floating point math, and the programmers must be carefull
with many simple calculations.. calculations that would be straightforward
using floating point....
But modern CPU's gets better and better with the floating point math, so
thats why you'll see more and more of this..

/M
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 6:58:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <d078m9$211o$1@news.cybercity.dk> dyster_tid@hotmail.com writes:

> Well, as the new processors process in 64 bit, its natural to follow up on
> this, and it will make your final results better.. its not just a marketing
> trick..

Isn't there a name for that law, the one that says when someone makes
a bigger pot, someone will come up with a bigger chicken to fill it?

> But modern CPU's gets better and better with the floating point math, so
> thats why you'll see more and more of this..

But they won't get any faster if people keep feeding them longer
numbers because they can. I don't need to do anything with
Word than I used to with Wordstar, and there was a time when I could
fit DOS, Wordstar, SuperCalc, and all the documents I was working on
at the time on to a 360K floppy disk.

Sure, I know that Word is more powerful, and indeed I DO do more
things with it now than I did with Wordstar, but back in the Wordstar
days all that was expected of me was to write text and someone else
would make it look pretty. Today, I'M expected to do the pretty stuff.
So I gotta have a more powerful computer.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 9:30:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message news:1gssxe5.1xf4sbytnblhtN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> Powell wrote:
> >
> > Ok. What's the difference between 32bit and 64 bit
> > *float*? And in what practical application does one
> > utilize the extra bits above 24 bits for?


> Marketing.


Hear, hear....

--
David Morgan (MAMS)
http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com
Morgan Audio Media Service
Dallas, Texas (214) 662-9901
_______________________________________
http://www.artisan-recordingstudio.com
Anonymous
March 4, 2005 6:41:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 17:09:50 -0500, "Powell" <nospam@noquacking.com>
wrote:

>Ok. What's the difference between 32bit and 64 bit

32
Anonymous
March 4, 2005 6:52:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> In article <d078m9$211o$1@news.cybercity.dk> dyster_tid@hotmail.com writes:
>
>
>>Well, as the new processors process in 64 bit, its natural to follow up on
>>this, and it will make your final results better.. its not just a marketing
>>trick..
>
>
> Isn't there a name for that law, the one that says when someone makes
> a bigger pot, someone will come up with a bigger chicken to fill it?
>
>

Parkinson's Law

http://www.heretical.com/miscella/parkinsl.html

<snip>
>
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
> However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
> lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
> you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
> and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo

--
Les Cargill
Anonymous
March 4, 2005 4:21:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Recently, Johann Burkard <johannburkard@nexgo.de> posted:

> Powell wrote:
>> "Johann Burkard" wrote
>>> This isn't new. Sound Forge 6 already supported 64 Bit
>>> float recording and sampling rates of 192 KHz.
>>
>> Ok. What's the difference between 32bit and 64 bit
>> *float*? And in what practical application does one
>> utilize the extra bits above 24 bits for?
>
> A 32 Bit floating point number uses 32 Bits and a 64 Bit floating
> point number uses 64 Bits ;-) 64 Bits obviously offers even greater
> precision.
>
> Using floating point arithmetic is nice when working with many tracks.
> On the other hand, 64 Bit is slower than 32 Bit (at least on 32 Bit
> machines). I think that might the reason that VST internally uses 32
> Bit floating point numbers.
>
The idea is to get better accuracy for processing and mixing, and higher
fp values would have no impact on recording. So, if your ADC can provide
192/32 content, one would be better off with 64 bit FP than 32 bit FP
while mixing or processing, but the raw recorded signal should be
identical in either case.

Floating point math operations are performed in the math coprocessing
portion of a CPU, and the speed of these operations depend on such things
as which instructions an application uses to do the processing and how
well the application conforms the data stream to those instructions. Some
applications, such as CoolEditPro have used larger floating point values
(56 bit, IIRC) for some time without a significant hit to performance,
even on slower machines. OTOH, serious performance hits (and worse) can
result from poorly implemented fp routines, especially in modern CPUs, due
to features that greatly increase internal precision for math operations
which are not time-sensitive.

Regards,

Neil
!