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Palmtops and batteries

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Anonymous
June 23, 2004 2:49:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

I have been put off palmtop devices a little since I found out that the
batteries lose their capacity to hold a charge fairly quickly and replacing
them is prohibitively expensive. I have heard quite a lot of people say
this. Does anyone have any experience to the contrary?

More about : palmtops batteries

Anonymous
June 23, 2004 2:49:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 22:49:18 +0100, "C Tate"
<colin@nobodyhere.mrcrtate.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:

>I have been put off palmtop devices a little since I found out that the
>batteries lose their capacity to hold a charge fairly quickly and replacing
>them is prohibitively expensive. I have heard quite a lot of people say
>this. Does anyone have any experience to the contrary?

If by "fairly quickly" you mean "a few years" and "prohibitively
expensive" you mean "$40 or so," you're right. Otherwise, that's not
the case. I've had my Clie S300 for four years and it still holds a
charge quite well.
--
Mike Koenecke
to e-mail, change domain to "alum.haverford.edu"
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 2:49:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 22:49:18 +0100, C Tate had this to say...


> I have been put off palmtop devices a little since I found out that the
> batteries lose their capacity to hold a charge fairly quickly and replacing
> them is prohibitively expensive. I have heard quite a lot of people say
> this. Does anyone have any experience to the contrary?

What is fairly quickly, they are designed to last at least 3 years.
The batteries are expensive in the beginning of the product cycle, same
as anything. Is $27us prohibitively expensive?

--
Hope this helps.
Jim Anderson
( 8(|) To email me just pull my_finger
Related resources
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 5:10:57 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <cba9h3$9hm$1@news5.svr.pol.co.uk>,
"C Tate" <colin@nobodyhere.mrcrtate.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:

> I have been put off palmtop devices a little since I found out that the
> batteries lose their capacity to hold a charge fairly quickly and replacing
> them is prohibitively expensive. I have heard quite a lot of people say
> this. Does anyone have any experience to the contrary?

The limiting factor is the number of deep recharges you put the LiIon
battery though. LiIon batteries can only put up with this some many
times, which is why 2 to 3 or 4 to 5'sh years is the expected life of
the battery. Running a LiLon battery down to almost nothing and then
charging it back up again will most likely give it its shortest life.

Now you add to that how fast the specific model of PDA chews up the
battery charge. If the PDA is slow to consume power it will most likely
go though fewer deep discharge/recharge cycles and live longer over all
for it. If the PDA runs though a charges very fast and you can not pop
it into the charger frequently, then it is likely to see a shorter
overall life to the battery.

But that is not an excuse for not getting a PDA.

If this is a case of never owning a PDA, and you are just afraid to jump
into the water, then you are never going to really find out if the PDA
will be useful to you. First assume that a lot of people use these
things everyday, and the benefit to them far out weights things like
batteries that do not hold their charge as long as when they were new.

I did not know what a PDA could do for my life until after I got one.
Then it totally transformed a lot of things. I'm less forgetful because
alarms remind me. And not just appointments. Getting my car inspected
during the right month each year. Birthdays, anniversaries, ... alarms
to remind me to do something when I get home at night, etc... Never
realized it would do this for me because I only thought of "Official"
meeting/appointment reminders which I do not have many of.

And I found ebooks. I found them big time, as I can sometimes read
upwards of 5 or 6 a month. I have paperback books sitting unread,
because I like the ebook format so much. And reading in bed, it has its
own built in back light. Being able to read while waiting for things
(doctor/dentist appointment, wife shopping for clothes, sitting in the
registry of motor vehicles [get lots of reading at the register :-)

Playing games on your PDA.

Keeping lists. There is the short term shopping list, or the "Honey Do"
list. There are also long term lists, like ideas for Christmas gifts
you think of all year long.

Using a secure encryption application to store passwords and other
sensitive information that is useful to have with you all the time, but
you have a hard time remembering everyone.

Being able to write down an idea in the middle of the night without
getting up and turning on a light (waking your spouse).

Being able to take notes when you are out comparison shopping. And if
you have a model with a camera, taking pictures of the items you are
comparing (like cars or furniture). You do not need a high resolution
camera for that.

If you get a model with a voice recorder, you can quickly record ideas
or notes while driving or when your holding your spouses hand during a
walk and it is not the best time to use 2 hands to write something on
your PDA.

Now if this is a case of switching from a Pocket PC based PDA to a Palm
OS based PDA, then at least you know what a PDA can do for you. All you
need to do is find a Palm PDA that has the features you want, and give
it a try. If you really do not like it, then sell it on eBay.

One other idea. There are Smart Cell phones out there, like the Treo600
(and others), that do include replaceable batteries. So that might be
an option for you.

Bob Harris
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 5:10:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <harris-D5A00D.20331622062004@cacnews.cac.cpqcorp.net>, Bob
Harris <harris@zk3.dec.com> wrote:

> In article <cba9h3$9hm$1@news5.svr.pol.co.uk>,
> "C Tate" <colin@nobodyhere.mrcrtate.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:
>
> > I have been put off palmtop devices a little since I found out that the
> > batteries lose their capacity to hold a charge fairly quickly and replacing
> > them is prohibitively expensive. I have heard quite a lot of people say
> > this. Does anyone have any experience to the contrary?

It's impossible to judge from your post if your concern is exaggerated or
reasonable.

"fairly quickly" Can you quantify? Also, what is your point of comparison?

The batteries don't last as long as when palmtop devices had only
monochrome displays. But they last long enough for most people to use in
most cases. By that I mean people still buy them and use them. My Tungsten
E does everything I need it to do every day without running down more than
half the battery. Since I recharge overnight, there's no problem the next
day either.

So what is "fairly quickly" to you?
June 23, 2004 5:10:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 01:10:57 GMT, Bob Harris wrote:

> If you get a model with a voice recorder, you can quickly record ideas
> or notes while driving or when your holding your spouses hand during a
> walk and it is not the best time to use 2 hands to write something on
> your PDA.

But your spouse still has a free hand to slap you with. :) 

--
"The best defense is no offense" - me.
June 23, 2004 7:40:59 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

I have a 5 year old Palm5 with it's original battery. Used every day
for 4.5 years about 2 hours a day for most. Many evenings reading
ebooks on it with 4+ hours each time.

My wife now uses it for ebook reading of a few hours per day. Battery
still gets about 20 hours per charge.

I've actually found that the Palm batteries survive longer than
batteries used in PocketPC PDAs.


In article <cba9h3$9hm$1@news5.svr.pol.co.uk>,
colin@nobodyhere.mrcrtate.fsnet.co.uk says...
> I have been put off palmtop devices a little since I found out that the
> batteries lose their capacity to hold a charge fairly quickly and replacing
> them is prohibitively expensive. I have heard quite a lot of people say
> this. Does anyone have any experience to the contrary?
>
>
>
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 12:33:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Many thanks to all who have replied, particularly Mr Harris who gave palms a
glowing endorsement! Maybe I will re-think now! As I said I was put off by
the whole battery thing. I had a battery operated (ie, not rechargeable)
handspring myself which gave up on life recently, after about 4 years. A
friend of mine has an Ipaq which was good but the battery now won't hold its
charge and it's not very old, only a couple of years. My boss had the same
experience and his model is only about 6 months old! Here in the UK it seems
you certainly can't get a replacement battery for price some of our US
friends are quoting. Paying £100 seems to be what is expected. I think
that's round $150!!

Anyway, can anyone recommend a good site (preferably UK) for comparing the
features of various palmtops?

Any help would be much appreciated.
"Bob Harris" <harris@zk3.dec.com> wrote in message
news:harris-D5A00D.20331622062004@cacnews.cac.cpqcorp.net...
> In article <cba9h3$9hm$1@news5.svr.pol.co.uk>,
> "C Tate" <colin@nobodyhere.mrcrtate.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:
>
> > I have been put off palmtop devices a little since I found out that the
> > batteries lose their capacity to hold a charge fairly quickly and
replacing
> > them is prohibitively expensive. I have heard quite a lot of people say
> > this. Does anyone have any experience to the contrary?
>
> The limiting factor is the number of deep recharges you put the LiIon
> battery though. LiIon batteries can only put up with this some many
> times, which is why 2 to 3 or 4 to 5'sh years is the expected life of
> the battery. Running a LiLon battery down to almost nothing and then
> charging it back up again will most likely give it its shortest life.
>
> Now you add to that how fast the specific model of PDA chews up the
> battery charge. If the PDA is slow to consume power it will most likely
> go though fewer deep discharge/recharge cycles and live longer over all
> for it. If the PDA runs though a charges very fast and you can not pop
> it into the charger frequently, then it is likely to see a shorter
> overall life to the battery.
>
> But that is not an excuse for not getting a PDA.
>
> If this is a case of never owning a PDA, and you are just afraid to jump
> into the water, then you are never going to really find out if the PDA
> will be useful to you. First assume that a lot of people use these
> things everyday, and the benefit to them far out weights things like
> batteries that do not hold their charge as long as when they were new.
>
> I did not know what a PDA could do for my life until after I got one.
> Then it totally transformed a lot of things. I'm less forgetful because
> alarms remind me. And not just appointments. Getting my car inspected
> during the right month each year. Birthdays, anniversaries, ... alarms
> to remind me to do something when I get home at night, etc... Never
> realized it would do this for me because I only thought of "Official"
> meeting/appointment reminders which I do not have many of.
>
> And I found ebooks. I found them big time, as I can sometimes read
> upwards of 5 or 6 a month. I have paperback books sitting unread,
> because I like the ebook format so much. And reading in bed, it has its
> own built in back light. Being able to read while waiting for things
> (doctor/dentist appointment, wife shopping for clothes, sitting in the
> registry of motor vehicles [get lots of reading at the register :-)
>
> Playing games on your PDA.
>
> Keeping lists. There is the short term shopping list, or the "Honey Do"
> list. There are also long term lists, like ideas for Christmas gifts
> you think of all year long.
>
> Using a secure encryption application to store passwords and other
> sensitive information that is useful to have with you all the time, but
> you have a hard time remembering everyone.
>
> Being able to write down an idea in the middle of the night without
> getting up and turning on a light (waking your spouse).
>
> Being able to take notes when you are out comparison shopping. And if
> you have a model with a camera, taking pictures of the items you are
> comparing (like cars or furniture). You do not need a high resolution
> camera for that.
>
> If you get a model with a voice recorder, you can quickly record ideas
> or notes while driving or when your holding your spouses hand during a
> walk and it is not the best time to use 2 hands to write something on
> your PDA.
>
> Now if this is a case of switching from a Pocket PC based PDA to a Palm
> OS based PDA, then at least you know what a PDA can do for you. All you
> need to do is find a Palm PDA that has the features you want, and give
> it a try. If you really do not like it, then sell it on eBay.
>
> One other idea. There are Smart Cell phones out there, like the Treo600
> (and others), that do include replaceable batteries. So that might be
> an option for you.
>
> Bob Harris
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 4:41:40 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <cbbbpa$1h3$1@news5.svr.pol.co.uk>,
"Colin Tate" <colin@mrcrtate.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:

> Many thanks to all who have replied, particularly Mr Harris who gave palms a
> glowing endorsement! Maybe I will re-think now! As I said I was put off by
> the whole battery thing. I had a battery operated (ie, not rechargeable)
> handspring myself which gave up on life recently, after about 4 years. A
> friend of mine has an Ipaq which was good but the battery now won't hold its
> charge and it's not very old, only a couple of years. My boss had the same
> experience and his model is only about 6 months old! Here in the UK it seems
> you certainly can't get a replacement battery for price some of our US
> friends are quoting. Paying £100 seems to be what is expected. I think
> that's round $150!!
>
> Anyway, can anyone recommend a good site (preferably UK) for comparing the
> features of various palmtops?

I spent a lot of time at http://1src.com reading the forums devoted to
specific Palm OS models. I got a lot of good information just by
lurking. But there are also posts from people asking specific questions
about a model they are interested in and owners of the PDA tend to give
useful feedback.

As for me, my first Palm OS was a Handspring Visor Edge. It was
rechargeable and over almost 3 years I had it, it did drop in its over
all battery life, but it still held a charge well enough to get me
through my day and that day generally spent a lot of time reading ebooks
which keeps the PDA powered on for extended periods of time. It was
gray scale screen and thus fairly power efficient.

Now I have the Sony CLIE TH55 and the battery life is fantastic. It
fits in my shirt pocket, it has WiFi (and in the UK you get Bluetooth),
web browser included, camera, voice recorder, Memory Stick slot, 32MB
user usable memory, can playback movies, MP3, Stereo Headphone jack,
320x480 display. I really like it a lot. It is a shame that Sony is
stepping back from the non-Japanese market and reevaluating its position
in 2005. I hope they come back in as I think they keep the creative
juices flowing for other Palm OS PDA manufactures.

Bob Harris

> Any help would be much appreciated.
> "Bob Harris" <harris@zk3.dec.com> wrote in message
> news:harris-D5A00D.20331622062004@cacnews.cac.cpqcorp.net...
> > In article <cba9h3$9hm$1@news5.svr.pol.co.uk>,
> > "C Tate" <colin@nobodyhere.mrcrtate.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:
> >
> > > I have been put off palmtop devices a little since I found out that the
> > > batteries lose their capacity to hold a charge fairly quickly and
> replacing
> > > them is prohibitively expensive. I have heard quite a lot of people say
> > > this. Does anyone have any experience to the contrary?
> >
> > The limiting factor is the number of deep recharges you put the LiIon
> > battery though. LiIon batteries can only put up with this some many
> > times, which is why 2 to 3 or 4 to 5'sh years is the expected life of
> > the battery. Running a LiLon battery down to almost nothing and then
> > charging it back up again will most likely give it its shortest life.
> >
> > Now you add to that how fast the specific model of PDA chews up the
> > battery charge. If the PDA is slow to consume power it will most likely
> > go though fewer deep discharge/recharge cycles and live longer over all
> > for it. If the PDA runs though a charges very fast and you can not pop
> > it into the charger frequently, then it is likely to see a shorter
> > overall life to the battery.
> >
> > But that is not an excuse for not getting a PDA.
> >
> > If this is a case of never owning a PDA, and you are just afraid to jump
> > into the water, then you are never going to really find out if the PDA
> > will be useful to you. First assume that a lot of people use these
> > things everyday, and the benefit to them far out weights things like
> > batteries that do not hold their charge as long as when they were new.
> >
> > I did not know what a PDA could do for my life until after I got one.
> > Then it totally transformed a lot of things. I'm less forgetful because
> > alarms remind me. And not just appointments. Getting my car inspected
> > during the right month each year. Birthdays, anniversaries, ... alarms
> > to remind me to do something when I get home at night, etc... Never
> > realized it would do this for me because I only thought of "Official"
> > meeting/appointment reminders which I do not have many of.
> >
> > And I found ebooks. I found them big time, as I can sometimes read
> > upwards of 5 or 6 a month. I have paperback books sitting unread,
> > because I like the ebook format so much. And reading in bed, it has its
> > own built in back light. Being able to read while waiting for things
> > (doctor/dentist appointment, wife shopping for clothes, sitting in the
> > registry of motor vehicles [get lots of reading at the register :-)
> >
> > Playing games on your PDA.
> >
> > Keeping lists. There is the short term shopping list, or the "Honey Do"
> > list. There are also long term lists, like ideas for Christmas gifts
> > you think of all year long.
> >
> > Using a secure encryption application to store passwords and other
> > sensitive information that is useful to have with you all the time, but
> > you have a hard time remembering everyone.
> >
> > Being able to write down an idea in the middle of the night without
> > getting up and turning on a light (waking your spouse).
> >
> > Being able to take notes when you are out comparison shopping. And if
> > you have a model with a camera, taking pictures of the items you are
> > comparing (like cars or furniture). You do not need a high resolution
> > camera for that.
> >
> > If you get a model with a voice recorder, you can quickly record ideas
> > or notes while driving or when your holding your spouses hand during a
> > walk and it is not the best time to use 2 hands to write something on
> > your PDA.
> >
> > Now if this is a case of switching from a Pocket PC based PDA to a Palm
> > OS based PDA, then at least you know what a PDA can do for you. All you
> > need to do is find a Palm PDA that has the features you want, and give
> > it a try. If you really do not like it, then sell it on eBay.
> >
> > One other idea. There are Smart Cell phones out there, like the Treo600
> > (and others), that do include replaceable batteries. So that might be
> > an option for you.
> >
> > Bob Harris
!