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And the Grammy for Engineering goes to....

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Anonymous
March 4, 2005 6:40:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Found this in the LA Times today. Anyone know this guy?

I posted the text as well as the link.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-charles3mar03,1...

Mark



Recordings Are Seized at Engineer's Home



Terry Howard, who won three Grammys last month for work with Ray
Charles, is arrested after police find singer's master tapes.


By Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer

A recording engineer who worked for Ray Charles for two decades and
who won three Grammys last month for his work on the late singer's
final album was arrested four days later after police pried open the
door of his Burbank loft and found 300 original master recordings that
belonged to Charles.

Terry Howard, 48, was in custody Wednesday after his arrest Feb. 17,
but his attorney, Steve Crom, said they would post bail today. A judge
reduced it from $1 million to $100,000 this week because Howard had no
criminal record.



"These are recordings that he contractually and logically had every
right to have in his possession," Crom said. A recording engineer, he
said, often works at home.

Los Angeles Police Det. Donald O. Hrycyk said the boxes of recordings
carted out of Howard's home — which consisted of a bed, refrigerator
and other amenities in a commercial property in a recording industry
district — were not digitally recorded discs brought home for
tinkering. The detective said the stacks of music included old
reel-to-reel recordings of Charles and other artists whose work had
been stored in the singer's library.

"There were tapes that were stored in climate-controlled rooms at Ray
Charles Enterprises, and they are so fragile that they need to be
heated to be played or else they can be destroyed," Hrycyk said. "When
we got to them, some of them were molding."

Jerry Digney, Charles' former publicist and spokesman for his estate,
said in a statement: "Whatever the outcome, Ray Charles Enterprises
puts a high value on its assets, especially its master tapes, and will
do its utmost to ensure their safety and proper handling along with
protecting other irreplaceable valuables belonging to the late
entertainer and to his estate."

Howard's attorney and his credits describe him as an Ohio native, an
Air Force veteran and a highly acclaimed technician in his field who
not only had the trust of Charles for years but worked with Barbra
Streisand, Stevie Wonder, Fleetwood Mac and Tom Jones.

As one of several engineers who worked on Charles' "Genius Loves
Company" album of all-star duets, released shortly after his death,
Howard shared in the Grammys awarded for record of the year, album of
the year and best-engineered non-classical recording.

A source in the recording industry said Howard was "a guy they brought
in when they needed him, a guy they trusted." Others in the Charles
camp said the singer would call on "Mr. T" when he was working late
nights at his famed RPM Studios on Washington Boulevard.

"Ray had the key, and Howard would meet him, and they'd work on stuff,
sometimes just them, but Ray couldn't see this guy was walking out
with all this stuff," Hrycyk said. "And that would be pretty sad if
that was the case."

If that were the case, it would add a posthumous chapter to the
betrayals of the singer, documented in the Oscar-nominated film "Ray,"
which showed that the iconic entertainer fought exploitation from his
earliest days in the business because of his blindness. Charles died
last summer at age 73 at his Beverly Hills home.

Hrycyk said an associate of Howard's told Ray Charles Enterprises
about the master recordings in Howard's loft, and police were
notified.

"When we got there, he wouldn't come to the door, but when we pried it
open, he came out," the detective said.

Crom and police said Howard had a flare-up last March with the
leadership at Ray Charles Enterprises. That led to "someone at Ray
Charles Enterprises wanting Howard to be less close to things," Crom
said

The attorney said that the filings in the case that have put the value
of the items in excess of $8 million are "ridiculous" and are based on
their value to a record company that could legitimately record, press
and distribute them exclusively. But once that's done, the quality of
every CD is as good as the master, he said, so after its release, its
value is diminished.

"Somebody is making a lot more of this than they should be," Crom
said, as if this were "Babe Ruth's bat."

Phil Ramone, a Grammy-winning producer who had worked with Charles,
said that he did not know Howard but that the topic was ricocheting
around the industry. "The value of these things would have been
limited," Ramone said. "It's like having a Picasso. Sure, you could
sell it, but everybody's going to know it, and if you try to make a
lot of money off it, you're not going to get far."

Police have not been able to catalog the items due to their fragility
and the fact that many are unlabeled. Police also seized a tour travel
box, used by touring concert bands for their gear, at Howard's
residence that was labeled "Ray Charles Enterprises," Hrycyk said.

More about : grammy engineering

March 4, 2005 6:53:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 3/3/05 10:40 PM, in article f8mf21loibvloangtnfrq5hnhkhobk8vd2@4ax.com,
"Mark Stebbeds" <nospam@nospam.org> wrote:

> Found this in the LA Times today. Anyone know this guy?

Only what I learned from the MIX article on the production of Ray's last
record that this guy was a big part of.
Strange...



>
> I posted the text as well as the link.
>
> http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-charles3mar03,1...
>
> Mark
>
>
>
> Recordings Are Seized at Engineer's Home
>
>
>
> Terry Howard, who won three Grammys last month for work with Ray
> Charles, is arrested after police find singer's master tapes.
>
>
> By Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
>
> A recording engineer who worked for Ray Charles for two decades and
> who won three Grammys last month for his work on the late singer's
> final album was arrested four days later after police pried open the
> door of his Burbank loft and found 300 original master recordings that
> belonged to Charles.
>
> Terry Howard, 48, was in custody Wednesday after his arrest Feb. 17,
> but his attorney, Steve Crom, said they would post bail today. A judge
> reduced it from $1 million to $100,000 this week because Howard had no
> criminal record.
>
>
>
> "These are recordings that he contractually and logically had every
> right to have in his possession," Crom said. A recording engineer, he
> said, often works at home.
>
> Los Angeles Police Det. Donald O. Hrycyk said the boxes of recordings
> carted out of Howard's home — which consisted of a bed, refrigerator
> and other amenities in a commercial property in a recording industry
> district — were not digitally recorded discs brought home for
> tinkering. The detective said the stacks of music included old
> reel-to-reel recordings of Charles and other artists whose work had
> been stored in the singer's library.
>
> "There were tapes that were stored in climate-controlled rooms at Ray
> Charles Enterprises, and they are so fragile that they need to be
> heated to be played or else they can be destroyed," Hrycyk said. "When
> we got to them, some of them were molding."
>
> Jerry Digney, Charles' former publicist and spokesman for his estate,
> said in a statement: "Whatever the outcome, Ray Charles Enterprises
> puts a high value on its assets, especially its master tapes, and will
> do its utmost to ensure their safety and proper handling along with
> protecting other irreplaceable valuables belonging to the late
> entertainer and to his estate."
>
> Howard's attorney and his credits describe him as an Ohio native, an
> Air Force veteran and a highly acclaimed technician in his field who
> not only had the trust of Charles for years but worked with Barbra
> Streisand, Stevie Wonder, Fleetwood Mac and Tom Jones.
>
> As one of several engineers who worked on Charles' "Genius Loves
> Company" album of all-star duets, released shortly after his death,
> Howard shared in the Grammys awarded for record of the year, album of
> the year and best-engineered non-classical recording.
>
> A source in the recording industry said Howard was "a guy they brought
> in when they needed him, a guy they trusted." Others in the Charles
> camp said the singer would call on "Mr. T" when he was working late
> nights at his famed RPM Studios on Washington Boulevard.
>
> "Ray had the key, and Howard would meet him, and they'd work on stuff,
> sometimes just them, but Ray couldn't see this guy was walking out
> with all this stuff," Hrycyk said. "And that would be pretty sad if
> that was the case."
>
> If that were the case, it would add a posthumous chapter to the
> betrayals of the singer, documented in the Oscar-nominated film "Ray,"
> which showed that the iconic entertainer fought exploitation from his
> earliest days in the business because of his blindness. Charles died
> last summer at age 73 at his Beverly Hills home.
>
> Hrycyk said an associate of Howard's told Ray Charles Enterprises
> about the master recordings in Howard's loft, and police were
> notified.
>
> "When we got there, he wouldn't come to the door, but when we pried it
> open, he came out," the detective said.
>
> Crom and police said Howard had a flare-up last March with the
> leadership at Ray Charles Enterprises. That led to "someone at Ray
> Charles Enterprises wanting Howard to be less close to things," Crom
> said
>
> The attorney said that the filings in the case that have put the value
> of the items in excess of $8 million are "ridiculous" and are based on
> their value to a record company that could legitimately record, press
> and distribute them exclusively. But once that's done, the quality of
> every CD is as good as the master, he said, so after its release, its
> value is diminished.
>
> "Somebody is making a lot more of this than they should be," Crom
> said, as if this were "Babe Ruth's bat."
>
> Phil Ramone, a Grammy-winning producer who had worked with Charles,
> said that he did not know Howard but that the topic was ricocheting
> around the industry. "The value of these things would have been
> limited," Ramone said. "It's like having a Picasso. Sure, you could
> sell it, but everybody's going to know it, and if you try to make a
> lot of money off it, you're not going to get far."
>
> Police have not been able to catalog the items due to their fragility
> and the fact that many are unlabeled. Police also seized a tour travel
> box, used by touring concert bands for their gear, at Howard's
> residence that was labeled "Ray Charles Enterprises," Hrycyk said.
Anonymous
March 6, 2005 6:57:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mark Stebbeds Wrote:
> Found this in the LA Times today. Anyone know this guy?
>
> I posted the text as well as the link.
>
> http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-charles3mar03,1...
>
> Mark
>
>
>
> Recordings Are Seized at Engineer's Home
>
> <snip happens>
>
> "These are recordings that he contractually and logically had every
> right to have in his possession," Crom said. A recording engineer, he
> said, often works at home.
>
> Los Angeles Police Det. Donald O. Hrycyk said the boxes of recordings
> carted out of Howard's home — which consisted of a bed, refrigerator
> and other amenities in a commercial property in a recording industry
> district —
>
> <snip happens>
>
>
> "When we got there, he wouldn't come to the door, but when we pried it
> open, he came out," the detective said.


In talking with some friends... it seems that someone at RCE kinda
jumped the gun on this for at the moment an unknown reason. Turns out
that there was well over a 20 year relationship between artist and
recordist, that there was a reason for this 20+ year relationship [like
Mr. Howard is an EXCELLENT engineer kind of a reason]... and there was
less than no intent to steal anything from anyone when it came to these
masters... or at least that's the word on the street in LA with people
that know the other side of this debacle.

Apparently the subject of this article did indeed live in his studio,
hence the bed, refrigerator and "other amenities" [like a shower?]...
the studio, not being your average piece of **** home studio, was
"soundproof" [hence why he didn't answer the door but came out after
they "pried it open"].

While the original article was obviously skewed by some publicist for
the person or persons who were pulling the strings from RCE, the fact
of the matter is that anyone who works on any "real" product should be
very worried right about now... imagine you happen to have some masters
from something you were working on... and all of a sudden the Gestapo is
kicking in the door?

I know I have "masters" at my house, as well as at my office... many of
these masters are indeed owned by record companies who didn't want to
store them/"outtake reels" at the end of the project, and the studio
didn't want to store them at the end of the project... so in many
cases, I got stuck with them.

Some of these masters have the work of dead people on them... after
this bullsh*t I'm going to figure out how to send them back to the
labels/artists/anyone in the fukking world but me!!!


--
Fletcher
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Anonymous
March 6, 2005 12:26:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I thought this story was a bit fishy. What was he going to do with these
"stolen" masters anyway?


Fletcher wrote:
> Mark Stebbeds Wrote:
>
>>Found this in the LA Times today. Anyone know this guy?
>>
>>I posted the text as well as the link.
>>
>>http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-charles3mar03,1...
>>
>>Mark
>>
>>
>>
>>Recordings Are Seized at Engineer's Home
>>
>><snip happens>
>>
>>"These are recordings that he contractually and logically had every
>>right to have in his possession," Crom said. A recording engineer, he
>>said, often works at home.
>>
>>Los Angeles Police Det. Donald O. Hrycyk said the boxes of recordings
>>carted out of Howard's home — which consisted of a bed, refrigerator
>>and other amenities in a commercial property in a recording industry
>>district —
>>
>><snip happens>
>>
>>
>>"When we got there, he wouldn't come to the door, but when we pried it
>>open, he came out," the detective said.
>
>
>
> In talking with some friends... it seems that someone at RCE kinda
> jumped the gun on this for at the moment an unknown reason. Turns out
> that there was well over a 20 year relationship between artist and
> recordist, that there was a reason for this 20+ year relationship [like
> Mr. Howard is an EXCELLENT engineer kind of a reason]... and there was
> less than no intent to steal anything from anyone when it came to these
> masters... or at least that's the word on the street in LA with people
> that know the other side of this debacle.
>
> Apparently the subject of this article did indeed live in his studio,
> hence the bed, refrigerator and "other amenities" [like a shower?]...
> the studio, not being your average piece of **** home studio, was
> "soundproof" [hence why he didn't answer the door but came out after
> they "pried it open"].
>
> While the original article was obviously skewed by some publicist for
> the person or persons who were pulling the strings from RCE, the fact
> of the matter is that anyone who works on any "real" product should be
> very worried right about now... imagine you happen to have some masters
> from something you were working on... and all of a sudden the Gestapo is
> kicking in the door?
>
> I know I have "masters" at my house, as well as at my office... many of
> these masters are indeed owned by record companies who didn't want to
> store them/"outtake reels" at the end of the project, and the studio
> didn't want to store them at the end of the project... so in many
> cases, I got stuck with them.
>
> Some of these masters have the work of dead people on them... after
> this bullsh*t I'm going to figure out how to send them back to the
> labels/artists/anyone in the fukking world but me!!!
>
>
Anonymous
March 6, 2005 12:29:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Fletcher" <Fletcher.1lgrdn@audiobanter.com> wrote in message
news:Fletcher.1lgrdn@audiobanter.com...
>
> Mark Stebbeds Wrote:
>> Found this in the LA Times today. Anyone know this guy?
>>
>> I posted the text as well as the link.
>>
>> http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-charles3mar03,1...
>>
>> Mark
>>
>>
>>
>> Recordings Are Seized at Engineer's Home
>>
>> <snip happens>
>>
>> "These are recordings that he contractually and logically had every
>> right to have in his possession," Crom said. A recording engineer, he
>> said, often works at home.
>>
>> Los Angeles Police Det. Donald O. Hrycyk said the boxes of recordings
>> carted out of Howard's home - which consisted of a bed, refrigerator
>> and other amenities in a commercial property in a recording industry
>> district -
>>
>> <snip happens>
>>
>>
>> "When we got there, he wouldn't come to the door, but when we pried it
>> open, he came out," the detective said.
>
>
> In talking with some friends... it seems that someone at RCE kinda
> jumped the gun on this for at the moment an unknown reason. Turns out
> that there was well over a 20 year relationship between artist and
> recordist, that there was a reason for this 20+ year relationship [like
> Mr. Howard is an EXCELLENT engineer kind of a reason]... and there was
> less than no intent to steal anything from anyone when it came to these
> masters... or at least that's the word on the street in LA with people
> that know the other side of this debacle.
>
> Apparently the subject of this article did indeed live in his studio,
> hence the bed, refrigerator and "other amenities" [like a shower?]...
> the studio, not being your average piece of **** home studio, was
> "soundproof" [hence why he didn't answer the door but came out after
> they "pried it open"].
>
> While the original article was obviously skewed by some publicist for
> the person or persons who were pulling the strings from RCE, the fact
> of the matter is that anyone who works on any "real" product should be
> very worried right about now... imagine you happen to have some masters
> from something you were working on... and all of a sudden the Gestapo is
> kicking in the door?
>
> I know I have "masters" at my house, as well as at my office... many of
> these masters are indeed owned by record companies who didn't want to
> store them/"outtake reels" at the end of the project, and the studio
> didn't want to store them at the end of the project... so in many
> cases, I got stuck with them.
>
> Some of these masters have the work of dead people on them... after
> this bullsh*t I'm going to figure out how to send them back to the
> labels/artists/anyone in the fukking world but me!!!
>
>
> --
> Fletcher

In helping to clear up a friend's estate, I'm having similar problems.
Years of annual requests for disposition instructions for session tapes have
apparently been ignored by labels and/or artists. My friend should have
disposed of the tapes as he threatened in the letters I suppose, but he was
reluctant to destroy the artists' work. Also, even if you send a registered
letter to a label or artist and get a receipt that it was delivered but
receive no reply, as happened in many cases, how do you carry out the threat
of destruction? You can't just pitch a couple hundred pounds of 24 track
reels into the trash, where some enterprising dumpster diver might dig them
out. The result, in the case I'm trying to resolve, is the equivalent of a
large bedroom stacked floor to ceiling with boxed session tapes, including
masters, not a few of which are very big sellers by known artists. I've got
it! I'll threaten to send the tapes to a well know pirate operation in
China that has agreed to assume responsibility for 'storing' the tapes.

Steve King
Anonymous
March 6, 2005 12:32:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve King wrote:


>
> You can't just pitch a couple hundred pounds of 24 track reels into
> the trash, where some enterprising dumpster diver might dig them out.


Bulk eraser?
March 6, 2005 4:39:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sun, 6 Mar 2005 03:57:16 +0000, Fletcher
<Fletcher.1lgrdn@audiobanter.com> wrote:

>[...] imagine you happen to have some masters
>from something you were working on...

Yeah, but 300?

I can see a 'few' from current and recent projects, but 300?
Something's not right here, I agree, but that number just doesn't
sound kosher.

A_C
March 6, 2005 4:41:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sun, 6 Mar 2005 09:29:18 -0600, "Steve King"
<steve@45steveking57.net> wrote:

>I've got it! I'll threaten to send the tapes to a well know pirate operation in
>China that has agreed to assume responsibility for 'storing' the tapes.

LOL, be sure to let us know when you're up for parole...

A_C
Anonymous
March 6, 2005 5:52:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1PKdnTSZWOKsv7bfRVn-sg@comcast.com> steve@45steveking57.net writes:

> In helping to clear up a friend's estate, I'm having similar problems.
> Years of annual requests for disposition instructions for session tapes have
> apparently been ignored by labels and/or artists. My friend should have
> disposed of the tapes as he threatened in the letters

> You can't just pitch a couple hundred pounds of 24 track
> reels into the trash, where some enterprising dumpster diver might dig them
> out.

I'd take the flanges off the reels, saw through the tape with a
bandsaw, sell the reels (premium for boxes with famous names on them)
on eBay, and toss the foot-long pieces of tape. I do this with my
scrap tape that I want to salvage for reels. It's faster, neater and
safer than cutting it with a razor blade.

Then you can see how long it takes for someone to put the scraps back
together and release the "unrealeased recordings."



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
March 6, 2005 7:03:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 3/6/05 10:29 AM, in article 1PKdnTSZWOKsv7bfRVn-sg@comcast.com, "Steve
King" <steve@45steveking57.net> wrote:

> "Fletcher" <Fletcher.1lgrdn@audiobanter.com> wrote in message
> news:Fletcher.1lgrdn@audiobanter.com...
>>
>> Mark Stebbeds Wrote:
>>> Found this in the LA Times today. Anyone know this guy?
>>>
>>> I posted the text as well as the link.
>>>
>>> http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-charles3mar03,1...
>>>
>>> Mark
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Recordings Are Seized at Engineer's Home
>>>
>>> <snip happens>
>>>
>>> "These are recordings that he contractually and logically had every
>>> right to have in his possession," Crom said. A recording engineer, he
>>> said, often works at home.
>>>
>>> Los Angeles Police Det. Donald O. Hrycyk said the boxes of recordings
>>> carted out of Howard's home - which consisted of a bed, refrigerator
>>> and other amenities in a commercial property in a recording industry
>>> district -
>>>
>>> <snip happens>
>>>
>>>
>>> "When we got there, he wouldn't come to the door, but when we pried it
>>> open, he came out," the detective said.
>>
>>
>> In talking with some friends... it seems that someone at RCE kinda
>> jumped the gun on this for at the moment an unknown reason. Turns out
>> that there was well over a 20 year relationship between artist and
>> recordist, that there was a reason for this 20+ year relationship [like
>> Mr. Howard is an EXCELLENT engineer kind of a reason]... and there was
>> less than no intent to steal anything from anyone when it came to these
>> masters... or at least that's the word on the street in LA with people
>> that know the other side of this debacle.
>>
>> Apparently the subject of this article did indeed live in his studio,
>> hence the bed, refrigerator and "other amenities" [like a shower?]...
>> the studio, not being your average piece of **** home studio, was
>> "soundproof" [hence why he didn't answer the door but came out after
>> they "pried it open"].
>>
>> While the original article was obviously skewed by some publicist for
>> the person or persons who were pulling the strings from RCE, the fact
>> of the matter is that anyone who works on any "real" product should be
>> very worried right about now... imagine you happen to have some masters
>> from something you were working on... and all of a sudden the Gestapo is
>> kicking in the door?
>>
>> I know I have "masters" at my house, as well as at my office... many of
>> these masters are indeed owned by record companies who didn't want to
>> store them/"outtake reels" at the end of the project, and the studio
>> didn't want to store them at the end of the project... so in many
>> cases, I got stuck with them.
>>
>> Some of these masters have the work of dead people on them... after
>> this bullsh*t I'm going to figure out how to send them back to the
>> labels/artists/anyone in the fukking world but me!!!
>>
>>
>> --
>> Fletcher
>... My friend should have
> disposed of the tapes as he threatened in the letters I suppose, but he was
> reluctant to destroy the artists' work. Also, even if you send a registered
> letter to a label or artist and get a receipt that it was delivered but
> receive no reply, as happened in many cases, how do you carry out the threat
> of destruction?

The movie BLOW OUT comes to mind.
THAT was a scary scene I tell you...
Anonymous
March 6, 2005 10:05:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve King wrote:

> The result, in the case I'm trying to resolve, is the equivalent of a
> large bedroom stacked floor to ceiling with boxed session tapes, including
> masters, not a few of which are very big sellers by known artists. I've got
> it! I'll threaten to send the tapes to a well know pirate operation in
> China that has agreed to assume responsibility for 'storing' the tapes.

Send 'em to hev and he'll put 'em line for ya.

--
ha
Anonymous
March 6, 2005 10:43:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Agent_C wrote:

> Fletcher wrote:

> >[...] imagine you happen to have some masters
> >from something you were working on...

> Yeah, but 300?

If he worked with Ray for twenty years, and especially if he worked on
the duo project, I could see that, even easily.

> I can see a 'few' from current and recent projects, but 300?
> Something's not right here, I agree, but that number just doesn't
> sound kosher.

I think we're reading RCE hype, passing mostly for news, and that if one
reads it carefully there are lots of things that don't sound kosher.
Most newspapers readers might want to convict the guy on the basis of
the news items, while they knwo absolutely nothing of sound studios or
mixing/producing practices.

--
ha
March 6, 2005 10:43:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 19:43:56 GMT, walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich)
wrote:

>Agent_C wrote:
>
>> Fletcher wrote:
>
>> >[...] imagine you happen to have some masters
>> >from something you were working on...
>
>> Yeah, but 300?
>
>If he worked with Ray for twenty years, and especially if he worked on
>the duo project, I could see that, even easily.
>
>> I can see a 'few' from current and recent projects, but 300?
>> Something's not right here, I agree, but that number just doesn't
>> sound kosher.
>
>I think we're reading RCE hype, passing mostly for news, and that if one
>reads it carefully there are lots of things that don't sound kosher.
>Most newspapers readers might want to convict the guy on the basis of
>the news items, while they knwo absolutely nothing of sound studios or
>mixing/producing practices.

I don't know... I managed the traffic in and out of the vault at EMI
New York for three years and don't recall ever coming across an
engineer, producer or musician who had that many tapes in their
possession. (With the possible exception of Ian Anderson, who as a
matter of policy keeps copies his own masters - all of them)

We tracked masters zealously after each project and had to account for
everything. On the rare occasion we came across tapes that were laying
around studios and someone's home, we always followed up and tried to
get them back.

This strikes me as either a sanctioned arrangement, or colossal
negligence on the part of the label(s).

This guy is not a bootlegger...

A_C
Anonymous
March 6, 2005 10:43:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'm just now dealing with a vault with over 3000 master tapes. The studio
went under, defaulted on their storage lease, and now, according to the
lease, the owner of the storage company "owns" the contents of the vault.
Of course, he has no legal right to exploit the recordings, but we have a
team of lawyers trying to figure out some of the ramifications.

All of the labels involved have been contacted repeatedly for the last ten
years, and only one has expressed interest in recovering their tapes. They
came by a couple of years ago, pulled about 300 masters, and left without
taking the tapes or paying the back storage on them. We're talking about
masters from some of the biggest artists of the last three decades, but once
the CD is out, the labels don't have much interest.

My gut tells me that there is no criminal activity in the Ray Charles
situation. Who knows what this guy was doing for Ray...maybe cataloging,
pulling alternate takes for a project, editing.....anything. I know I would
much rather do that kind of stuff at home as well. Just some people trying
to make a name or a case on someone else's misfortune.

Oh well.




On 3/6/05 4:15 PM, in article f6sm21d58gsi8cond6jes1qgjpqbu186a4@4ax.com,
"Agent_C" <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote:

> On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 19:43:56 GMT, walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich)
> wrote:
>
>> Agent_C wrote:
>>
>>> Fletcher wrote:
>>
>>>> [...] imagine you happen to have some masters
>>>> from something you were working on...
>>
>>> Yeah, but 300?
>>
>> If he worked with Ray for twenty years, and especially if he worked on
>> the duo project, I could see that, even easily.
>>
>>> I can see a 'few' from current and recent projects, but 300?
>>> Something's not right here, I agree, but that number just doesn't
>>> sound kosher.
>>
>> I think we're reading RCE hype, passing mostly for news, and that if one
>> reads it carefully there are lots of things that don't sound kosher.
>> Most newspapers readers might want to convict the guy on the basis of
>> the news items, while they knwo absolutely nothing of sound studios or
>> mixing/producing practices.
>
> I don't know... I managed the traffic in and out of the vault at EMI
> New York for three years and don't recall ever coming across an
> engineer, producer or musician who had that many tapes in their
> possession. (With the possible exception of Ian Anderson, who as a
> matter of policy keeps copies his own masters - all of them)
>
> We tracked masters zealously after each project and had to account for
> everything. On the rare occasion we came across tapes that were laying
> around studios and someone's home, we always followed up and tried to
> get them back.
>
> This strikes me as either a sanctioned arrangement, or colossal
> negligence on the part of the label(s).
>
> This guy is not a bootlegger...
>
> A_C
>
Anonymous
March 7, 2005 12:47:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1110127954k@trad...
>
> In article <1PKdnTSZWOKsv7bfRVn-sg@comcast.com> steve@45steveking57.net
> writes:
>
>> In helping to clear up a friend's estate, I'm having similar problems.
>> Years of annual requests for disposition instructions for session tapes
>> have
>> apparently been ignored by labels and/or artists. My friend should have
>> disposed of the tapes as he threatened in the letters
>
>> You can't just pitch a couple hundred pounds of 24 track
>> reels into the trash, where some enterprising dumpster diver might dig
>> them
>> out.
>
> I'd take the flanges off the reels, saw through the tape with a
> bandsaw, sell the reels (premium for boxes with famous names on them)
> on eBay, and toss the foot-long pieces of tape. I do this with my
> scrap tape that I want to salvage for reels. It's faster, neater and
> safer than cutting it with a razor blade.
>
> Then you can see how long it takes for someone to put the scraps back
> together and release the "unrealeased recordings."
>
Okay. Now, let's all tell our favorite story about the
intern/apprentice/new engineer/old hand who used a razor blade to slice off
the junk-stuff reel only to find that it was the master that hadn't been
labeled yet story. Why do these all happen at 2 AM. I do love the band-saw
idea. Two-inch tape is no fun to cut with a razor blade.

Steve King
Anonymous
March 7, 2005 1:02:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
news:1gt02d8.1ynbruqbwe48vN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> Agent_C wrote:
>
>> Fletcher wrote:
>
>> >[...] imagine you happen to have some masters
>> >from something you were working on...
>
>> Yeah, but 300?
>
> If he worked with Ray for twenty years, and especially if he worked on
> the duo project, I could see that, even easily.
>
>> I can see a 'few' from current and recent projects, but 300?
>> Something's not right here, I agree, but that number just doesn't
>> sound kosher.
>
I routinely made dupes of masters for many clients, labeled them as
M2-2T-######, our designation for a back-up stereo master, put the charge on
the job sheet, and took them home with the clients full knowledge and
approval. It was a CYA thing in case the studio got swallowed up by one of
those Midwest volcanic eruptions that happen every million years or so. A
few times they actually saw use. Always after the client had signed them
out of the studio and lost them or, in one case, splattered most of a reel
around a west coast control room, when an old Presto deck had a brake
failure.

Steve King
Anonymous
March 7, 2005 2:00:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Agent_C wrote:

> I don't know... I managed the traffic in and out of the vault at EMI
> New York for three years and don't recall ever coming across an
> engineer, producer or musician who had that many tapes in their
> possession. (With the possible exception of Ian Anderson, who as a
> matter of policy keeps copies his own masters - all of them)

> We tracked masters zealously after each project and had to account for
> everything. On the rare occasion we came across tapes that were laying
> around studios and someone's home, we always followed up and tried to
> get them back.

And that's how it's supposed to be done. But not every entity owning
such tapes kept such diligent track of them.

> This strikes me as either a sanctioned arrangement, or colossal
> negligence on the part of the label(s).
>
> This guy is not a bootlegger...

Agreed. Can't imagine he'd risk his successful career on those tapes.

--
ha
Anonymous
March 7, 2005 3:07:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <znr1110127954k@trad>, mrivers@d-and-d.com says...
> I'd take the flanges off the reels, saw through the tape with a
> bandsaw, sell the reels (premium for boxes with famous names on them)
> on eBay, and toss the foot-long pieces of tape. I do this with my
> scrap tape that I want to salvage for reels. It's faster, neater and
> safer than cutting it with a razor blade.

This reminds me of a story one of my Berklee professors told us.
Apparently, someone left a razor blade sitting on the Otari in just such
a position that it ended up slicing through the tape as it wound onto
the take-up reel. Hit rewind at the end of the night and was left with
nothing but shreds. Frantically tried (and failed) to splice it back
together. Got an "A", because he learned a valuable lesson...

--
Jay Levitt |
Wellesley, MA | I feel calm. I feel ready. I can only
Faster: jay at jay dot fm | conclude that's because I don't have a
http://www.jay.fm | full grasp of the situation. - Mark Adler
Anonymous
March 7, 2005 12:02:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <vKidnQhZF8_eUrbfRVn-sA@comcast.com> steve@45steveking57.net writes:

> Okay. Now, let's all tell our favorite story about the
> intern/apprentice/new engineer/old hand who used a razor blade to slice off
> the junk-stuff reel only to find that it was the master that hadn't been
> labeled yet story.

Someone told me that story. The studio where he was recording had one
of those newfangled 8-track recorders and the engineer needed a takeup
reel. He found a 1" reel with a small amount of tape on it which he
cut through with a razor blade to free up the reel. Then someone asked
for that reel that had a good take on it.

Of course they spliced all the pieces together and they were good to
go.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
March 7, 2005 10:01:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 3/7/05 9:02 AM, in article znr1110197228k@trad, "Mike Rivers"
<mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

> Someone told me that story. The studio where he was recording had one
> of those newfangled 8-track recorders and the engineer needed a takeup
> reel. He found a 1" reel with a small amount of tape on it which he
> cut through with a razor blade to free up the reel. Then someone asked
> for that reel that had a good take on it.
>
> Of course they spliced all the pieces together and they were good to
> go.


Can you do that with a hard drive?
Anonymous
March 7, 2005 10:01:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <BE520F2B.28D9%ssconmag1@verizon.net>, John <ssconmag1@verizon.net>
wrote:

> On 3/7/05 9:02 AM, in article znr1110197228k@trad, "Mike Rivers"
> <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
>
> > Someone told me that story. The studio where he was recording had one
> > of those newfangled 8-track recorders and the engineer needed a takeup
> > reel. He found a 1" reel with a small amount of tape on it which he
> > cut through with a razor blade to free up the reel. Then someone asked
> > for that reel that had a good take on it.
> >
> > Of course they spliced all the pieces together and they were good to
> > go.
>
>
> Can you do that with a hard drive?
>

The hard drive does it automatically.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
March 7, 2005 10:01:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John wrote:
> On 3/7/05 9:02 AM, in article znr1110197228k@trad, "Mike Rivers"
> <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
>
>
>> Someone told me that story. The studio where he was recording had one
>> of those newfangled 8-track recorders and the engineer needed a takeup
>> reel. He found a 1" reel with a small amount of tape on it which he
>> cut through with a razor blade to free up the reel. Then someone asked
>> for that reel that had a good take on it.
>>
>> Of course they spliced all the pieces together and they were good
>> to go.
>
>
> Can you do that with a hard drive?


NSA probably could, but not us mortals.
!