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Wireless adapter for windows 98 millenium

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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February 13, 2013 8:05:42 AM

Hello,
im looking for a wireless adapter for windows millennium not windows 98 as millennium and 98 or similar but two different operating systems and i know that this is quite hard but on forums some people have done it
its a desktop machine and has a 32 bit system
can any one point me in the right direction ?

thanks
February 13, 2013 11:53:05 PM

cathcart said:
Hello,
im looking for a wireless adapter for windows millennium not windows 98 as millennium and 98 or similar but two different operating systems and i know that this is quite hard but on forums some people have done it
its a desktop machine and has a 32 bit system
can any one point me in the right direction ?

thanks

Go to Newegg.com and get a usb adapter.
February 14, 2013 12:08:32 AM

You're better off using a wireless ethernet adapter (aka client bridge) because it doesn't require OS drivers! All the wireless functionality resides in the bridge. The OS doesn't even know wireless is in the picture. And all you need is an ethernet port.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E... (in client mode)
http://www.rakuten.com/prod/levelone-wbr-6802-150mbps-w... (in client mode)
http://www.rakuten.com/prod/zyxel-mwr102-wireless-n-poc... (in client mode)
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February 16, 2013 8:07:50 AM

148106,3,572771 said:
You're better off using a wireless ethernet adapter (aka client bridge) because it doesn't require OS drivers! All the wireless functionality resides in the bridge. The OS doesn't even know wireless is in the picture. And all you need is an ethernet port.

With the devices you mentioned could you connect to a wi-fi network or can you explain how this works ?

thanks
February 16, 2013 11:23:14 AM

cathcart said:
148106,3,572771 said:
You're better off using a wireless ethernet adapter (aka client bridge) because it doesn't require OS drivers! All the wireless functionality resides in the bridge. The OS doesn't even know wireless is in the picture. And all you need is an ethernet port.

With the devices you mentioned could you connect to a wi-fi network or can you explain how this works ?

thanks
said:


Yes. All those I listed are considered travel routers. They support multiple configuration modes (router, AP, client, and sometimes repeater), and selectable via hard/soft switch. When client mode is selected, the wireless radio acts like any other wireless client (i.e., USB, PCI) and can connect to a remote wireless AP. What makes it different from a USB or PCI wireless adapter is that the other end of the bridge has an ethernet port. You patch that end to the ethernet port of your computer (or any other wired-only device). As far as your computer is concerned, it's connected over wire. But it's actually just a short length of ethernet patch to the bridge. And then the bridge connects over wireless to the AP.

[wireless router]<-- wireless -->[travel router (in client mode)](lan)<-- wire -->(lan)[computer]

Because all the wireless functionality is confined to the bridge and the computer is technically still using wire, you have ZERO compatibility issues. Heck, a bridge like this would work even with Windows 3.0/3.1, when wireless didn't even exist!
February 16, 2013 12:02:16 PM

2 questions please.
I want to make sure i understand this.

1. I think what your saying is this item takes the place of an installed PCI card or wireless usb adapter and allows you to connect to a wireless network with your existing ethernet port?

2. Is the signal strength degraded as opposed to a hard wired computer?
February 16, 2013 12:28:11 PM

gerry410 said:
1. I think what your saying is this item takes the place of an installed PCI card or wireless usb adapter and allows you to connect to a wireless network with your existing ethernet port?


Yes.

gerry410 said:
2. Is the signal strength degraded as opposed to a hard wired computer?


Whether you use a wireless ethernet bridge, PCI adapter, or USB adapter, they're ALL wireless radio. They all have the same basic wireless chipsets, and they all use antennas of one sort or another. But w/ the wireless ethernet bridge, you’re pushing the wireless radio out and away from your PC. Besides not having to deal w/ compatibility issues, this probably ENHANCES your wireless signal for several reasons. First, it’s farther away from any EMI that your computer may be producing. Second, your placement/orientation options for best signal reception are much greater (limited only by the ethernet cable, 100m unamplified). And third, the antenna solutions are often better, esp. if you choose to use a full-sized router (some support client bridging natively, while others support third party firmware that does too).

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

The above D-Link DIR-615 can be updated w/ dd-wrt (third party firmware) to support wireless ethernet bridging (and many other options). The advantage here is the much better antennas. And the fact the integrated switch means you can have MULTIPLE ethernet devices sharing the wireless bridge. The downside is the much bigger footprint (at least some ppl would consider that a negative in some situations; e.g., it's not very portable).
!