Vision Plan Differences - TREO Smartphone

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

I am having a little difficulting in understanding the difference
between the Professional and Premium Vision Plan (the fact that their
website gives a few blurbs doesn't help). My question is do you get POP
mail access with the Premium? This seems to be the big difference to
me other than all the downloads that I don't need on the Premium. I
need POP access to my mail. I believe you can get it with either plan,
but think you might have to go through some portal rather than getting
directly on the TREO 650 if you don't have the PRO. I don't need access
to an MS exchange server, so if I get the same POP with Premium, I
would go with the Premium for the free downloads since they are both
$15. Comments?
9 answers Last reply
More about vision plan differences treo smartphone
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    michaeljc70@hotmail.com wrote:
    > I
    > need POP access to my mail. I believe you can get it with either plan,
    > but think you might have to go through some portal rather than getting
    > directly on the TREO 650 if you don't have the PRO.


    Incorrect. If you use Versamail or any other POP mail client, then you
    can get POP mail on your Treo with even the most basic Vision plan. The
    Treo 650 is smart enough to act as its own POP client, just as your
    desktop is able to, so unless you specifically want a portal to
    intervene, the Treo 650 is perfectly capable of doing it without one.

    > to an MS exchange server, so if I get the same POP with Premium, I
    > would go with the Premium for the free downloads since they are both
    > $15.

    The free downloads pack is fine. You might also be able to sweet talk
    CS into giving you the $10 Vision plan with no download credit if you
    don't plan on downloading any of the Sprint premium content, and you'll
    also be just fine.

    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Yes, thanks, that helps. But what does the Business Connection add? As
    I understand it, if your company (or you) have an Exchange server, it
    can sync email and calendar. Does it provide more than that (like email
    push)?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    In article <1103597834.084454.53150@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
    michaeljc70@hotmail.com says...
    > I am having a little difficulting in understanding the difference
    > between the Professional and Premium Vision Plan (the fact that their
    > website gives a few blurbs doesn't help). My question is do you get POP
    > mail access with the Premium? This seems to be the big difference to
    > me other than all the downloads that I don't need on the Premium. I
    > need POP access to my mail. I believe you can get it with either plan,
    > but think you might have to go through some portal rather than getting
    > directly on the TREO 650 if you don't have the PRO. I don't need access
    > to an MS exchange server, so if I get the same POP with Premium, I
    > would go with the Premium for the free downloads since they are both
    > $15. Comments?
    >

    You get POP3 email access even *without* a Vision plan. A Vision
    package only affects how you are charged for the Internet usage your
    accumulate. A flat fee if on a package, a per-KB fee if not.

    All phones with PCS Vision capability are enabled from the start by
    default. Unless the customer specifically requests otherwise.

    Think of it this way: there are four "a la carte" items available for
    packaging in a Vision Package: Picturemail/Videomail, $5 in "cash-back"
    credit for "Premium Service" downloads, Unlimited Web access (including
    POP3, since you asked about it), and, finally, Business Connection
    Personal Edition.

    Sprint has 3 packages (I'll ignore the streaming media option for this
    example, as I'm fairly certain it doesn't apply to the Treo 650). All 3
    include the unlimited Web access. They differ in the other two parts
    they offer. The "Pictures" Package includes Picturemail/Videomail, and
    the $5 download credit. The "Premium" Package doubles up the $5
    download credit to yield a total $10/month "cash-back" credit for
    Premium Service downloads. The "Professional" Package provides the
    Picturemail/Videomail option, and then the Business Connection Personal
    Edition service.

    Is that easier to grasp? Other than questions about the individual
    services, does that help you to understand?

    --
    RØß
    O/Siris
    ~+~
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    -Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792-
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    In article <1103671424.798389.210050@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    michaeljc70@hotmail.com says...
    > Yes, thanks, that helps. But what does the Business Connection add? As
    > I understand it, if your company (or you) have an Exchange server, it
    > can sync email and calendar. Does it provide more than that (like email
    > push)?
    >
    >

    I'm not sure I'd call it more. I'd rather call it "something else."
    Business Connection is a program that permits access to email, but there
    are two versions.

    Enterprise Edition (BCEE) creates the Exchange Server access you're
    talking about.

    Personal Edition (BCPE) is more of a "Remote Control" of Microsoft
    Outlook. With it, you install a small software client on a PC. You run
    that client, and MS Outlook. As long as that PC is connected to the
    Internet, then you can use a phone, *any* web enabled SPCS phone, and
    hook into MS Outlook to view your contacts, your calendar, your email,
    and respond to all of the above. There's also the ability to pick one
    folder on your PC as a share folder to be accessible via BCPE.

    With a Treo, you also have a Palm client you can install on the Treo.
    It can synch with Outlook via the BCPE connection, either manually, or
    at regular intervals.

    As that suggests, it is *not* a push service. It pulls.

    As an aside, BCPE can also be set to pull any POP3 email. But, since
    any Palm email client can do the same via Vision/Internet, I don't
    generally consider this any more advantageous in BCPE.

    If you're interested in what BCPE can do for you, there's information on
    this at http://bc.sprintpcs.com

    In fact, you can sign up there for a two-month free trial if you'd like
    to try it out. You can always swap to the Vision Professional Pack
    within the 60 days and remain active with BCPE.

    --
    RØß
    O/Siris
    ~+~
    A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    It sounds like BCPE won't do much for me. I sync Outlook myself and
    don't need on the road syncing. I also have Outlook setup to send me an
    SMS automatically when I get an email. I think I will go with the
    Premium Plan as you get the free downloads and it sounds like I won't
    gain anything from the BCPE.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    O/Siris wrote:

    > As that suggests, it is *not* a push service. It pulls.

    Point of clarity: BCPE can generate SMS alerts on messages marked
    highest priority if. You receive a SMS with the message subject and
    directions to log on to Biz Connection to read the rest of the message.

    Another minor detail: BCPE will deliver mail, calendar, and contacts if
    you're pointing it at an Exchange server, but it will deliver mail
    content from any IMAP mailer you configure your desktop client to point to.

    -anne
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    O/Siris wrote:

    > As that suggests, it is *not* a push service. It pulls.

    Point of clarity: BCPE can generate SMS alerts on messages marked
    highest priority if. You receive a SMS with the message subject and
    directions to log on to Biz Connection to read the rest of the message.

    Another minor detail: BCPE will deliver mail, calendar, and contacts if
    you're pointing it at an Exchange server, but it will deliver mail
    content from any IMAP mailer you configure your desktop client to point to.

    -anne
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    O/Siris wrote:

    > As that suggests, it is *not* a push service. It pulls.

    Point of clarity: BCPE can generate SMS alerts on messages marked
    highest priority if. You receive a SMS with the message subject and
    directions to log on to Biz Connection to read the rest of the message.

    Another minor detail: BCPE will deliver mail, calendar, and contacts if
    you're pointing it at an Exchange server, but it will deliver mail
    content from any IMAP mailer you configure your desktop client to point to.

    -anne
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    In article <41C9AC64.3030805@some.newsreader.com>, news-
    reader@some.newsreader.com says...
    > Another minor detail: BCPE will deliver mail, calendar, and contacts if
    > you're pointing it at an Exchange server, but it will deliver mail
    > content from any IMAP mailer you configure your desktop client to point to.
    >

    That not what I trained. BCPE does not interact with Exchange Server.
    Not directly. Business Connection *Enterprise Edition* does.

    BCPE Interacts with Outlook. And if Outlook is hooked up to MS Exchange
    Server, then yeah, it'll do what you say.

    --
    RØß
    O/Siris
    ~+~
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    -Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792-
Ask a new question

Read More

Sprint PCS Smartphones Treo Internet Service Providers