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Layla (song) ending

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Anonymous
March 14, 2005 2:07:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story on
the little end guitar ditty on this song ?

It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of 11-year-olds.
It embarasses me to hear it.

geoff

More about : layla song ending

Anonymous
March 14, 2005 12:38:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote in message
news:4235613b@clear.net.nz...
> Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story on
> the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>
> It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
11-year-olds.
> It embarasses me to hear it.

That's Duane Allman on the slide.
A little out in spots, eh? <GGG>

Poly
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 4:45:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 23:07:31 +1300, "Geoff Wood"
<geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote:

>Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story on
>the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>
>It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of 11-year-olds.
>It embarasses me to hear it.
>
>geoff
>

Not only for Layla but for the entire album, I've always been thinking
that everyone must have been quite drunk at recording sessions. If I'm
forgiving, it's quite sympatic. But if I am not...

Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Related resources
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 4:45:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 13:45:15 +0100, Edi Zubovic <edi.zubovic[rem
this]@ri.htnet.hr> wrote:

>On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 23:07:31 +1300, "Geoff Wood"
><geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote:
>
>>Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story on
>>the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>>
>>It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of 11-year-olds.
>>It embarasses me to hear it.
>>
>>geoff
>>
>
>Not only for Layla but for the entire album, I've always been thinking
>that everyone must have been quite drunk at recording sessions.

Well, they weren't drunk, they were on heroin. But there is still
some great music on there IMO... sorry if you can't hear that.

Al
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 5:46:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Even if it was tacked on later (and it does sound like it), I like it.
It reminds me of little singing birdies, which I like. Sometimes
things are just that simple. I read something once comparing the
analysis of music to pulling the wings off a butterfly to see what
makes it tick. As much as I like analyzing music, let's not forget the
butterflies.

Mikey Wozniak
Nova Music Productions
this sig is haiku
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 6:41:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Geoff Wood Wrote:
> Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story
> on
> the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>
> It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
> 11-year-olds.
> It embarasses me to hear it.
>
> geoff

Embarasses you? I have always found it to be a great example of what
rock and roll really is... a good middle finger in the air expression
of the moment... then again Steely Dan records make me ill so what do I
know...


--
Fletcher
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 6:41:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 15:41:24 +0000, Fletcher
<Fletcher.1lwi1o@audiobanter.com> wrote:

>
>Geoff Wood Wrote:
>> Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story
>> on
>> the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>>
>> It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
>> 11-year-olds.
>> It embarasses me to hear it.
>>
>> geoff
>
>Embarasses you? I have always found it to be a great example of what
>rock and roll really is... a good middle finger in the air expression
>of the moment... then again Steely Dan records make me ill so what do I
>know...

I just watched a DVD, (one of those VH-1 "Classic Album" series) about
the making of Steely Dan's Aja. What a cold vibe those two dudes
have. I like the classic album series though, I watched another one
about the making of The Band's 1st and 2nd albums, Music From Big
Pink, etc. What a contrast...

Al
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 7:46:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Geoff Wood wrote:

> Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story on
> the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>
> It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of 11-year-olds.
> It embarasses me to hear it.


It's one of my favorite pieces of music on my favorite album ever. That
said, I didn't like the remix from the 1988 box set, although I knew the
guy who did it, and he was a very nice guy.
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 10:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Huh??? 'scuse you? I didn't say anything about the fade. I said that
the piano coda, that melody was orignally created by something that
Duane Allman played, ie he wrote that part, although it ended up being
played on piano by someone else, it was originally Duane's idea. I
heard this from people who would know.

Al
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 10:52:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote in message
news:4235613b@clear.net.nz...
> Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story on
> the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>
> It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
> 11-year-olds. It embarasses me to hear it.

I've always thought the same thing. The piano part is nice but I think part
of my dislike of Duane (that took a long time to get over) was directly
related to this ending. It's horrid. The ending was tagged on weeks later.
See the movie "Tom Dowd & the Language of Music" (a _fantastic_ doc BTW) for
more including him pulling up each part track by track. Luckily it cuts off
before the real ugliness starts.
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 10:52:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

A little too much heroin on the date I think!!
kevin
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 10:52:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 19:52:11 GMT, "Ricky Hunt" <rhunt22@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>"Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote in message
>news:4235613b@clear.net.nz...
>> Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story on
>> the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>>
>> It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
>> 11-year-olds. It embarasses me to hear it.
>
>I've always thought the same thing. The piano part is nice but I think part
>of my dislike of Duane (that took a long time to get over) was directly
>related to this ending. It's horrid. The ending was tagged on weeks later.
>See the movie "Tom Dowd & the Language of Music" (a _fantastic_ doc BTW) for
>more including him pulling up each part track by track. Luckily it cuts off
>before the real ugliness starts.

The piano coda was actually taken from an line Duane played on the
slide... he contributed quite a bit on that LP, in spite of the
occasional out-of-tuneness.

Al
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 11:41:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Watch the Tom Dowd DVD and learn. He actually sits at the console and
brings up the faders. He doesn't explain what you hear, but if you can't
get the idea from the man, then you'll just spend some more years learning.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio
http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/

"Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote in message
news:4235613b@clear.net.nz...
> Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story on
> the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
>
> It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
11-year-olds.
> It embarasses me to hear it.
>
> geoff
>
>
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 11:42:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bullshit. Watch the Tom Dowd DVD. The musicians don't do the fades, play
on. You know that.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio
http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/

"play on" <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:57vb31l2gshh3p13rvsbc78j9b50t5k5k0@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 13:45:15 +0100, Edi Zubovic <edi.zubovic[rem
> this]@ri.htnet.hr> wrote:
>
> >On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 23:07:31 +1300, "Geoff Wood"
> ><geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote:
> >
> >>Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story
on
> >>the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
> >>
> >>It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
11-year-olds.
> >>It embarasses me to hear it.
> >>
> >>geoff
> >>
> >
> >Not only for Layla but for the entire album, I've always been thinking
> >that everyone must have been quite drunk at recording sessions.
>
> Well, they weren't drunk, they were on heroin. But there is still
> some great music on there IMO... sorry if you can't hear that.
>
> Al
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 11:44:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

None of the album was tacked on later. All done live, in the studio with
Tom Dowd engineering and his mixing after the project was done.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio
http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/

"Ricky Hunt" <rhunt22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:LXlZd.67982$Ze3.16108@attbi_s51...
> "Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote in message
> news:4235613b@clear.net.nz...
> > Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story
on
> > the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
> >
> > It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
> > 11-year-olds. It embarasses me to hear it.
>
> I've always thought the same thing. The piano part is nice but I think
part
> of my dislike of Duane (that took a long time to get over) was directly
> related to this ending. It's horrid. The ending was tagged on weeks later.
> See the movie "Tom Dowd & the Language of Music" (a _fantastic_ doc BTW)
for
> more including him pulling up each part track by track. Luckily it cuts
off
> before the real ugliness starts.
>
>
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 12:26:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Roger W. Norman" wrote:

> Watch the Tom Dowd DVD and learn. He actually sits at the console and
> brings up the faders. He doesn't explain what you hear, but if you can't
> get the idea from the man, then you'll just spend some more years learning.


I love that movie! I could watch it a gaziliion times.
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 1:01:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

play on wrote:
>
> Huh??? 'scuse you? I didn't say anything about the fade. I said that
> the piano coda, that melody was orignally created by something that
> Duane Allman played, ie he wrote that part, although it ended up being
> played on piano by someone else, it was originally Duane's idea. I
> heard this from people who would know.
>
> Al

Odd. The story I've read a few places (Mojo, Rolling Stone) is that
Jim Gordon wrote the outro on piano. IIRC, he was saving it for his
solo album, but Eric talked him into including it in "Layla".
And the writing credit on my LP copy is Eric Clapton/Jim Gordon.

Again IIRC Duane came up with "the riff". The lazy unplugged version
of "Layla" Clapton recorded much later was more his original idea.

This place claims roughly the same things, quoting Bobby Whitlock.
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.lasso?id=785

But none of this makes Duane's playing in the outro any more
in tune: but I'll settle for great playing out of tune....

Henry Salvia.
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 2:16:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Gordon wrote it, I just heard that the inspiration for some the melody
came from something he heard Duane play at some point in the sessions
(not neccessarily what he was playing on the outro). I heard this from
some of the members of Bonnie Bramlett's band when I was playing guitar
for her.

I guess Gordon still gets lots of royalties from it, although he can't
really spend them since he's in the asylum...

Al
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 2:25:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 13:07:43 -0800, play on <playonAT@comcast.net>
wrote:

----------<>--------------------------------
>>Not only for Layla but for the entire album, I've always been thinking
>>that everyone must have been quite drunk at recording sessions.
>
>Well, they weren't drunk, they were on heroin. But there is still
>some great music on there IMO... sorry if you can't hear that.
>
>Al

Oh, I didn't mean _that_. Layla is indeed one of my all-time
favorites. Just it could have been technically better I think.
But sure, those flaws -- if I may call them so -- are today pieces of
the picture of that legendary album, yes. I think if it would be
possible to correct them by "remastering", I'd opt to leave them as
they are, if nothing than for the sake of the truth.

But I don't like working drunk and I hate heroin and btw I don't like
drugs -- no need for <well do you see _that_ subtle difference I wrote
heh <g>?

Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 3:28:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Tom played the tape and showed the fade, as far as I remember. You take it
from there. I don't know who should know more than the engineer that
recorded and mixed the album so I will take Tom Dowd at face value.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio
http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/

"play on" <lordkoos@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1110857556.333688.80660@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Huh??? 'scuse you? I didn't say anything about the fade. I said that
> the piano coda, that melody was orignally created by something that
> Duane Allman played, ie he wrote that part, although it ended up being
> played on piano by someone else, it was originally Duane's idea. I
> heard this from people who would know.
>
> Al
>
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 3:40:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Indeed it is an eye opener. From the hands and ears of a master.

Sometimes I worry about dying because I have my grandchildren and children,
not to mention my wife to worry about. But the fact is if I done a good job
in all the different aspects of what I've worked at in my life, that makes
things much easier. Tom Dowd obviously loved what he was doing. He wasn't
just an engineer, he was a participant. He made things work. He worked
hard. He loved what he was doing. These last three sentences would be nice
to see on my headstone and my family will have to deal with it. Love in
life usually comes around a number of times. One can love a number of women
for what they are, one can love their children as they change and grow, and
one can even love their life-long friends. But one's true love is what they
do and who they are. That's a type of love that transcends all timelines
and personal involvements.

Tom Dowd expressed this every day of his life. Excellence comes from the
the expression. Tom Dowd and excellence are the same thing.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio
http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/

"Don Cooper" <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:423647C4.17357C7B@comcast.net...
>
>
> "Roger W. Norman" wrote:
>
> > Watch the Tom Dowd DVD and learn. He actually sits at the console and
> > brings up the faders. He doesn't explain what you hear, but if you
can't
> > get the idea from the man, then you'll just spend some more years
learning.
>
>
> I love that movie! I could watch it a gaziliion times.
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 4:32:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks for the reference. The stories might not be the same, but then
again, it is some decades later.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio
http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/

"Henry Salvia" <hjs@cadence.com> wrote in message
news:42367A33.2CC58EF5@cadence.com...
> play on wrote:
> >
> > Huh??? 'scuse you? I didn't say anything about the fade. I said that
> > the piano coda, that melody was orignally created by something that
> > Duane Allman played, ie he wrote that part, although it ended up being
> > played on piano by someone else, it was originally Duane's idea. I
> > heard this from people who would know.
> >
> > Al
>
> Odd. The story I've read a few places (Mojo, Rolling Stone) is that
> Jim Gordon wrote the outro on piano. IIRC, he was saving it for his
> solo album, but Eric talked him into including it in "Layla".
> And the writing credit on my LP copy is Eric Clapton/Jim Gordon.
>
> Again IIRC Duane came up with "the riff". The lazy unplugged version
> of "Layla" Clapton recorded much later was more his original idea.
>
> This place claims roughly the same things, quoting Bobby Whitlock.
> http://www.songfacts.com/detail.lasso?id=785
>
> But none of this makes Duane's playing in the outro any more
> in tune: but I'll settle for great playing out of tune....
>
> Henry Salvia.
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 4:37:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mikey likes it, and so do I! He wrote:

> Even if it was tacked on later (and it does sound like it), I like
it.
> It reminds me of little singing birdies, which I like.

To me it sounds more like the screaming of angels as they have their
wings ripped off, which is pretty much the theme of the song. I think
this is one of the best examples of "incorrect" being way better than
if it had been mechanically perfect. Screams are not meant to be
perfectly in tune or in time.
The first time I heard Layla I was 16 and driving home from work
around midnight. The song was so overwhelmingly powerful that I
couldn't even drive. I had to pull over to the side of the road, turn
the engine off, crank up the radio and just listen in awe. By the end
I was practically comatose.
As amazing as the first half was, the second half was almost even
better in it's elegance and majesty. That turn-around chord gets my
vote as the single most amazing chord in the history of rock and roll.
I figured it out on piano once, but now I've lost it. Doesn't really
work on guitar. It's a voicing/passing-notes type of thing.
I genuinely feel sorry for anyone who can't appreciate that song
for whatever reason.
My sympathies, Rick Novak.
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 7:40:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

eric clapton stealing george harrison's wife

>Embarasses you? I have always found it to be a great example of what
>rock and roll really is... a good middle finger in the air expression
>of the moment...

> I think this is one of the best examples of "incorrect" being way
better than
>if it had been mechanically perfect...........
>I genuinely feel sorry for anyone who can't appreciate that .....

amen, it is the essence of how they were expressing the angst
"you know it's just your foolish pride"
then the last song.......
it fits....

dale
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 10:39:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
news:79adnZnm9pIyoKvfRVn-qQ@rcn.net...
> None of the album was tacked on later. All done live, in the studio with
> Tom Dowd engineering and his mixing after the project was done.

Actually it was. I believe Tom said the end section (where the piano starts)
was recording two weeks after the first section.
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 11:46:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Edi Zubovic <edi.zubovic[rem this]@ri.htnet.hr> wrote:
>
>Not only for Layla but for the entire album, I've always been thinking
>that everyone must have been quite drunk at recording sessions. If I'm
>forgiving, it's quite sympatic. But if I am not...

My ex's husband attributes the quality of the album to the musicians being
on "every drug known to science in the 1970s." He cited the more recent
acoustic version of Layla as being what happens when the drugs are removed.

When he said this, I hadn't heard it, but I have since heard the acoustic
version, and to be honest I like it more at the slower tempo and with the
simpler arrangement.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 12:11:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It's funny, but WHEN pulling off the road to listen to a song happens,
there's no cop in the world that will accept that explanation. I mean,
we've all heard about it happening or it's happened to us, but how do you
tell a cop you're listening to some music that's so powerful you can't
drive?

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio
http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/

"rickymix" <snovak2@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:1110879436.224778.140340@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Mikey likes it, and so do I! He wrote:
>
> > Even if it was tacked on later (and it does sound like it), I like
> it.
> > It reminds me of little singing birdies, which I like.
>
> To me it sounds more like the screaming of angels as they have their
> wings ripped off, which is pretty much the theme of the song. I think
> this is one of the best examples of "incorrect" being way better than
> if it had been mechanically perfect. Screams are not meant to be
> perfectly in tune or in time.
> The first time I heard Layla I was 16 and driving home from work
> around midnight. The song was so overwhelmingly powerful that I
> couldn't even drive. I had to pull over to the side of the road, turn
> the engine off, crank up the radio and just listen in awe. By the end
> I was practically comatose.
> As amazing as the first half was, the second half was almost even
> better in it's elegance and majesty. That turn-around chord gets my
> vote as the single most amazing chord in the history of rock and roll.
> I figured it out on piano once, but now I've lost it. Doesn't really
> work on guitar. It's a voicing/passing-notes type of thing.
> I genuinely feel sorry for anyone who can't appreciate that song
> for whatever reason.
> My sympathies, Rick Novak.
>
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 12:16:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

That's what happens when you buy adjoining townhouses in Old Town
Alexandria. "Hey, I went to the wrong house and, well, frankly George, Eric
was just out of the shower and things went from there."

The good thing is that in didn't totally kill Eric and George's
relationship, although it put a crimp in it for a few years. I think it's
kinda funny that guys seem to be able to get over women problems between
them and women seem to want to kill. My best friend's wife is my old high
school sweetheart. Never had an effect on our relationship.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio
http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/

"dale" <dallen@frognet.net> wrote in message
news:1110890438.561947.17450@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> eric clapton stealing george harrison's wife
>
> >Embarasses you? I have always found it to be a great example of what
> >rock and roll really is... a good middle finger in the air expression
> >of the moment...
>
> > I think this is one of the best examples of "incorrect" being way
> better than
> >if it had been mechanically perfect...........
> >I genuinely feel sorry for anyone who can't appreciate that .....
>
> amen, it is the essence of how they were expressing the angst
> "you know it's just your foolish pride"
> then the last song.......
> it fits....
>
> dale
>
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 12:57:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:


> When he said this, I hadn't heard it, but I have since heard the acoustic
> version, and to be honest I like it more at the slower tempo and with the
> simpler arrangement.

I can't help but disagree. This acoustic version, like many "unplugged"
songs would be totally useless without having followed the original. It
is one of those things, when you hear it, the mind fills in the blanks
because you know how it is *suppose* to sound.

I find this with very low fidelity and/or low volume as well. You hear a
song at the grocery store and it has a much larger impact than otherwise
would be the case, because the image of (the normally) soaring guitar
leads and thundering drums is conjured up in your brain as you hear it.
March 15, 2005 3:29:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 14 Mar 2005 12:06:34 -0800, "Matrixmusic"
<kevindoylemusic@rogers.com> wrote:

>A little too much heroin on the date I think!!
>kevin

rubbish, you're never really loaded 'til you overdose.
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 4:57:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The ending to Layla was tacked on!
Tom
"Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
news:79adnZnm9pIyoKvfRVn-qQ@rcn.net...
> None of the album was tacked on later. All done live, in the studio with
> Tom Dowd engineering and his mixing after the project was done.
>
> --
>
>
> Roger W. Norman
> SirMusic Studio
> http://blogs.salon.com/0004478/
>
> "Ricky Hunt" <rhunt22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:LXlZd.67982$Ze3.16108@attbi_s51...
> > "Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote in message
> > news:4235613b@clear.net.nz...
> > > Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the
story
> on
> > > the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
> > >
> > > It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
> > > 11-year-olds. It embarasses me to hear it.
> >
> > I've always thought the same thing. The piano part is nice but I think
> part
> > of my dislike of Duane (that took a long time to get over) was directly
> > related to this ending. It's horrid. The ending was tagged on weeks
later.
> > See the movie "Tom Dowd & the Language of Music" (a _fantastic_ doc BTW)
> for
> > more including him pulling up each part track by track. Luckily it cuts
> off
> > before the real ugliness starts.
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 5:33:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I shall repeat this story, so those of you who have read it may skip it. ;-)
I have had the chance to play with the muti track of Layla, which was quite
the deja vu, when I watched the Tom Dowd disk. Pitch and rock and roll,
there's a non sequitor.
Listen to the "greatest rock & roll song" ever recorded
"Like a Rolling Stone". Not my pick, but hey.
Listen to the Bob's guitar part, and try to figure out what planet he tuned
his guitar on.
Guess that didn't matter too much, did it?
Duane Allman was a brilliant guitar player,and I don't care if he was "out
of tune". The most amazing playing was at the end of Layla, that no one
heard, but I did!
That recording sounded great when it was made!
Karl Richardson eng. the whole record, and he's no slouch by the way. If you
don't know who he is, google him.
Oh yeah, for the trivia addicts in all of us, the mortorcycle helmet that
Eric's wearing in a pic,
on the Layla "album jacket", was Karl's too.
The "talk box" he used on "461" was a big Altec or JBL horn driver, that
Seth Snyder, "built".
That made your teeth vibrate quite a bit, to say the least.
I'm done,
Tom






"Fletcher" <Fletcher.1lwi1o@audiobanter.com> wrote in message
news:Fletcher.1lwi1o@audiobanter.com...
>
> Geoff Wood Wrote:
> > Don't know what God, or the producers were thinking, but what the story
> > on
> > the little end guitar ditty on this song ?
> >
> > It sounds like a recorder and some guitars given to a bunch of
> > 11-year-olds.
> > It embarasses me to hear it.
> >
> > geoff
>
> Embarasses you? I have always found it to be a great example of what
> rock and roll really is... a good middle finger in the air expression
> of the moment... then again Steely Dan records make me ill so what do I
> know...
>
>
> --
> Fletcher
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 7:49:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"novamusic" <novamusic@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1110840396.203038.311560@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...

> Even if it was tacked on later (and it does sound like it), I like it.
> It reminds me of little singing birdies, which I like.


Those birdies were well and truly out of their trees, I suspect. But so
must have been teh producer to let it on the master. Just the piano would
have been fine.

geoff
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 3:17:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I think it's more like "what happens when people get old". Drugs or
not, people generally rock harder when they are younger. What I didn't
like about the unplugged version was the shuffle feel, but then I guess
they had to do something different to it.

Al
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 2:13:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Layla seems to be one of those record. People either consider it the
greatest musical statement ever made or they don't care for it. For me
(who cares, right?) I always felt the record has way too many guitar
tracks and too many simultaneous notes going on at once in general.
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 3:34:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I think Eric sings much better now, than he did 30 years ago.

Tom


"play on" <lordkoos@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1110961027.485194.185740@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> I think it's more like "what happens when people get old". Drugs or
> not, people generally rock harder when they are younger. What I didn't
> like about the unplugged version was the shuffle feel, but then I guess
> they had to do something different to it.
>
> Al
>
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 5:10:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

blu (frankie?) wrote:
> ...the record has way too many guitar
tracks and too many simultaneous notes going on at once in general."

Which is why I love it. Reminds me of the inside of my head! :>)

> Layla seems to be one of those records. People either consider it the

greatest musical statement ever made or they don't care for it.

You're absolutey right about that. I understand why it bothers people,
but it works for me. The chaos supports the theme.
Cheers, Rick.
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 6:23:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 16 Mar 2005 11:13:05 -0800, bluemt@earthlink.net wrote:

>Layla seems to be one of those record. People either consider it the
>greatest musical statement ever made or they don't care for it. For me
>(who cares, right?) I always felt the record has way too many guitar
>tracks and too many simultaneous notes going on at once in general.

That's a fair criticsm but the songs hold up, and the arrangments,
while guitar heavy, do work pretty well.

Al
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 6:59:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The story that I read (several times over the years) was that Jim Gordon was
using the studio's down time (that is, when the dominos weren't there) to
work on his own record without paying studio time. The piano part at the end
of Layla was part of that project. When the band found out about it, that
particular piece was hijacked into the Dominos record...

--
Dave Martin
Java Jive Studio
Nashville, TN
www.javajivestudio.com


"Ricky Hunt" <rhunt22@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1jwZd.68924$r55.63957@attbi_s52...
> "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
> news:79adnZnm9pIyoKvfRVn-qQ@rcn.net...
> > None of the album was tacked on later. All done live, in the studio
with
> > Tom Dowd engineering and his mixing after the project was done.
>
> Actually it was. I believe Tom said the end section (where the piano
starts)
> was recording two weeks after the first section.
>
>
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 2:45:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"play on" <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:D tfh31pt0ne6n5qdjn52jphsbhk3vm2sid@4ax.com...
> On 16 Mar 2005 11:13:05 -0800, bluemt@earthlink.net wrote:
>
> >Layla seems to be one of those record. People either consider it the
> >greatest musical statement ever made or they don't care for it. For me
> >(who cares, right?) I always felt the record has way too many guitar
> >tracks and too many simultaneous notes going on at once in general.
>
> That's a fair criticsm but the songs hold up, and the arrangments,
> while guitar heavy, do work pretty well.<

Wow...that's the first time I've seen this in print. The fact that some
musical folk don't actually 'adore' this track. Well, here's my shocker - me
neither.

But, I'll toss in that I think it works because the simple piano anchors all
the hub-bub during the finale. No doubt a great track, but as far as Clapton
it's never been a favorite of mine.

BTW - I've never heard a really clean, dynamic version of this song - does
one exist? Like Heros and Villians by the Beach Boys, 'Layla' always had a
mushy sound. Is it the recording, the mix or the master? Who knows huh?

MT









>
> Al
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 2:45:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 23:45:43 -0500, "Mike Tschel." <Mike@Hotmail.com>
wrote:

>
>"play on" <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote in message
>news:D tfh31pt0ne6n5qdjn52jphsbhk3vm2sid@4ax.com...
>> On 16 Mar 2005 11:13:05 -0800, bluemt@earthlink.net wrote:
>>
>> >Layla seems to be one of those record. People either consider it the
>> >greatest musical statement ever made or they don't care for it. For me
>> >(who cares, right?) I always felt the record has way too many guitar
>> >tracks and too many simultaneous notes going on at once in general.
>>
>> That's a fair criticsm but the songs hold up, and the arrangments,
>> while guitar heavy, do work pretty well.<
>
>Wow...that's the first time I've seen this in print. The fact that some
>musical folk don't actually 'adore' this track. Well, here's my shocker - me
>neither.
>
>But, I'll toss in that I think it works because the simple piano anchors all
>the hub-bub during the finale. No doubt a great track, but as far as Clapton
>it's never been a favorite of mine.
>
>BTW - I've never heard a really clean, dynamic version of this song - does
>one exist? Like Heros and Villians by the Beach Boys, 'Layla' always had a
>mushy sound. Is it the recording, the mix or the master? Who knows huh?

I'd guess it's the recording, they were all playing together in the
same room for the basics, using small amps & not wearing headphones.
I imagine the bleed accounts for some of the mush?

Al
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 10:00:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2005-03-16 d16our$cj2$1@panix2.panix.com said:
>I think it's more like "what happens when people get old". Drugs or
>not, people generally rock harder when they are younger. What I
>didn't like about the unplugged version was the shuffle feel, but
>then I guess they had to do something different to it.
THe shuffle feel made it more pallatable to folks like my mother who
didn't like the original but decided after the unplugged album that
she dug Clapton.
Btw the unplugged version as made its way to the realm of lounge
lizzard piano gigs. Heard a guy with a piano trio do a rather neat
arrangement of it back in Des Moines Iowa many years ago and have
pulled it out on occasion myself. I can actually sing within the
range he has for the unplugged version <g>.




Richard Webb,
Electric SPider Productions, New Orleans, La.
REplace anything before the @ symbol with elspider for real email

--



Braille: support true literacy for the blind!
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 6:29:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Geoff Wood wrote:

> But the guitar playing is pre-juvenille in technique and concept, and I feel
> it was sad that it was performed, recorded, and added to the final mix. A
> bad production decision.

I sure many brilliant careers have been built around second-guessing Tom
Dowd. <g>

--
ha
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 12:13:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I guess it depends on how much weight you give to the substance,
meaning, or significance of a song. I tend to think that "Satisfaction"
by the Stones is a better combination of music, attitude, performance,
and meaning, but "Like a Rolling Stone" is a work of genius, an acerbic
summation of a culture that has adopted and embraced utterly false and
degrading values. It's savage.

"Layla" may or may not be great music, but it's unusually intense, but
it's still a love song that, as ever, doesn't really tell you very much
about either the lover or the object of his love. The overwrought ending
takes me back to about age 13 or so.

Eleanor, gee I think you're swell
And you really do me well
You're my heart and soul etecetra.

Compare to a single line from "Suzanne"
And she feeds you tea and oranges
That come all the way from China

I had to look up the lyrics of Layla, but I have never stopped
wondering, for forty years, what wealth of untold experiences are
contained in the words "tea and oranges".

How about that for deep? Or,

Can you cook and sew, make flowers grow
Do you understand my pain?

Just to prove that even Dylan can write the odd incredibly bad lyric.

For a really, really rich love song, and an example of how to develop a
wealth and depth of expression with understatement: Tangled up in Blue,
by Dylan.

But I personally think the best love song ever is Leonard Cohen's
"Hallelujah".

Your faith was strong, but you needed proof
You saw her bathing on the roof..


Tommy B wrote:

> Listen to the "greatest rock & roll song" ever recorded
> "Like a Rolling Stone". Not my pick, but hey.
> Listen to the Bob's guitar part, and try to figure out what planet he tuned
> his guitar on.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 12:25:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Well, when you're about 16, "Layla" should pretty well do it for you.
I'm not sure it holds up for me as well over the years, except as a
passionate reminder of how I felt when I was about 16 and a girl I
really, really liked rejected me.

If that is what it feels like for you at 40, I'd say more power to you,
but I'd also wonder if you weren't missing on some of the nuances of
love at that age. By that time of my life, I was much more moved by

Hungry as an archway
Through which the troops have passed

or

You're faithful to the better man
I'm afraid that he left
So let me judge your love affair
In this very room where I have sentenced mine to death
I'll even wear these laurel leaves
He's shaken from his hair
Take this longing from my tongue...

Or sometimes

Do-wah diddy diddy dum diddy doo.



rickymix wrote:
> Mikey likes it, and so do I! He wrote:

> The first time I heard Layla I was 16 and driving home from work
> around midnight. The song was so overwhelmingly powerful that I
> couldn't even drive. I had to pull over to the side of the road, turn
> the engine off, crank up the radio and just listen in awe. By the end
> I was practically comatose.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 1:01:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Tommy B" <mrtomm@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:mnCZd.9390$oO4.859@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> I shall repeat this story, so those of you who have read it may skip it.
;-)
> I have had the chance to play with the muti track of Layla, which was
quite
> the deja vu, when I watched the Tom Dowd disk. Pitch and rock and roll,
> there's a non sequitor.
> Listen to the "greatest rock & roll song" ever recorded
> "Like a Rolling Stone". Not my pick, but hey.
> Listen to the Bob's guitar part, and try to figure out what planet he
tuned
> his guitar on.
> Guess that didn't matter too much, did it?
> Duane Allman was a brilliant guitar player,and I don't care if he was
"out
> of tune". The most amazing playing was at the end of Layla, that no one
> heard, but I did!
> That recording sounded great when it was made!
> Karl Richardson eng. the whole record, and he's no slouch by the way. If
you
> don't know who he is, google him.
> Oh yeah, for the trivia addicts in all of us, the mortorcycle helmet that
> Eric's wearing in a pic,
> on the Layla "album jacket", was Karl's too.
> The "talk box" he used on "461" was a big Altec or JBL horn driver, that
> Seth Snyder, "built".
> That made your teeth vibrate quite a bit, to say the least.
> I'm done,
> Tom


Yes, a story like this is worth repeating.

Predrag
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 1:33:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bill wrote:
> I'm not sure it holds up for me as well over the years, except as a
passionate reminder of how I felt when I was about 16 and a girl I
really, really liked rejected me.

Bill, I'm afraid you might have missed the point of the lyric, which is
much more complex. It's about stealing away your best friend's woman,
in Eric's case George Harrison's wife Patti, who then married Clapton
and eventually dumped him too. It's about as deep as you're going to
get in rock lyrics. I guess it's not spelled out that clearly in the
lyrics themselves, but pretty much common knowledge and legend.
Cheers, Rick.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 1:36:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bill wrote:
> I'm not sure it holds up for me as well over the years, except as a
passionate reminder of how I felt when I was about 16 and a girl I
really, really liked rejected me.

Bill, I'm afraid you might have missed the point of the lyric, which is
much more complex. It's about stealing away your best friend's woman,
in Eric's case George Harrison's wife Patti, who then married Clapton
and eventually dumped him too. It's about as deep as you're going to
get in rock lyrics. I guess it's not spelled out that clearly in the
lyrics themselves, but pretty much common knowledge and legend.
Cheers, Rick.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 3:40:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 18 Mar 2005 10:33:04 -0800, "rickymix" <snovak2@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>Bill wrote:
>> I'm not sure it holds up for me as well over the years, except as a
>passionate reminder of how I felt when I was about 16 and a girl I
>really, really liked rejected me.
>
>Bill, I'm afraid you might have missed the point of the lyric, which is
>much more complex. It's about stealing away your best friend's woman,
>in Eric's case George Harrison's wife Patti, who then married Clapton
>and eventually dumped him too.

Yeah but you only know those details because you read it in Rolling
Stone, not because it's in the lyrics.

Al
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 3:52:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

play on wrote:

>On 18 Mar 2005 10:33:04 -0800, "rickymix" <snovak2@earthlink.net> wrote:
>
>>Bill, I'm afraid you might have missed the point of the lyric, which is
>>much more complex. It's about stealing away your best friend's woman,
>>in Eric's case George Harrison's wife Patti, who then married Clapton
>>and eventually dumped him too.
>
>Yeah but you only know those details because you read it in Rolling
>Stone, not because it's in the lyrics.

The lyrics may not explicitely name George and Patti, but how else might
you interpret:

Tried to give you consolation.
Your old man had let you down.
Like a fool, I feel in love with you.
Turned my whole world upside down.

?

--
========================================================================
Michael Kesti | "And like, one and one don't make
| two, one and one make one."
mkesti@gv.net | - The Who, Bargain
!