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sub-notebook for recording

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March 14, 2005 9:01:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I am thinking of getting a sub-laptop for location recording, either
using my RME Multiface (I'll buy the PCMCIA interface) or possibly an
Echo Indigo I/O for compact stereo use. This computer would
supplement, not replace, my home system. I would also use it for live
performance from Reaktor and Samplitude running on Windows XP.

Portability is a high priority, which is why I am considering units
with 10" screens. I believe that the processors, memory, and hard
drive capacities of these are more than up to the task (in general)
since they at least the equal of much larger computers from five years
ago. However, I am sure that compromises made in the construction and
configuration of such units might make them unsuitable for pro audio
recording.

My physical location makes trying systems almost impossible, so I want
to know as much as possible before buying one. This is all still
hypothetical but any advice based on experience with these sorts of
systems would be welcome. I have found very little by searching.

Examples:
Fujitsu Loox T70H
Sony Vaio T series
Sharp Actius MM20

If I could find such a tiny computer I would be happy with 2-in/2-out
at 16-bit/44KHz (for recording senario) and 6 channels out for
playback scenario. Otherwise I'd maybe be happy with a larger form
factor. (But there are threads already on that.)

Hopefully this thread will also help others.

-- robin

More about : notebook recording

Anonymous
March 14, 2005 9:01:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> > I am thinking of getting a sub-laptop for location recording,
either
> > using my RME Multiface (I'll buy the PCMCIA interface) or possibly
an
> > Echo Indigo I/O for compact stereo use. This computer would
> > supplement, not replace, my home system. I would also use it for
live
> > performance from Reaktor and Samplitude running on Windows XP.

I just bought an IBM X31, and I highly recommend it. IBM are usually
business-oriented machines and they're second to none. The X31 is not
typical of IBMs since it has a built-in firewire slot, so no need for
adapters. I also have live performance in mind, and because of that I'm
waiting for the Edirol FA-66 firewire 24/96/192 firewire audio module.
It has a built-in analog limiter which may fall handy. It seems the
most practical set so I wouldn't spend more for RME stuff.
Maybe this helps.
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 9:01:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

visitor2@zaz.com.br wrote:
> > > I am thinking of getting a sub-laptop for location recording,
> either
> > > using my RME Multiface (I'll buy the PCMCIA interface) or
possibly
> an
> > > Echo Indigo I/O for compact stereo use. This computer would
> > > supplement, not replace, my home system. I would also use it for
> live
> > > performance from Reaktor and Samplitude running on Windows XP.
>
> I just bought an IBM X31, and I highly recommend it. IBM are usually
> business-oriented machines and they're second to none. The X31 is not
> typical of IBMs since it has a built-in firewire slot, so no need for
> adapters.

Just curious - how much was the X31, what's the processor speed and
screen size, and does it also have USB2? I'm soon in the market for a
laptop DAW, and I don't want Dell or compaq.

Thanks,

Mikey Wozniak
Nova Music Productions
this sig is haiku
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Anonymous
March 14, 2005 9:50:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"robin" <escalation746@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:71fb31licl4s2it68m3sn28hcgf19e4g9a@4ax.com...
> I am thinking of getting a sub-laptop for location recording, either
> using my RME Multiface (I'll buy the PCMCIA interface) or possibly an
> Echo Indigo I/O for compact stereo use. This computer would
> supplement, not replace, my home system. I would also use it for live
> performance from Reaktor and Samplitude running on Windows XP.


Seem to remember seeing quite recently (in the rec.audio.* forums) that the
inputs on these are frequently just mono. Worth checking out if it's
important to you.

--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
March 15, 2005 10:15:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

visitor2@zaz.com.br wrote:

>I just bought an IBM X31, and I highly recommend it. IBM are usually
>business-oriented machines and they're second to none.

I believe this unit is a tad bigger than the ones I mentioned, but is
still a good candidate, so thanks! Given that you recommend it, what
audio applications have you used it with? How is it for noise?

Personally I hate the IBM look and the damned eraser pointing device,
which means I would have to carry around an external trackpad. The
fact it has no memory sharing for graphics is good but the 4200 rpm
drive would need testing. One big disappointment is the lack of a DVD
burner. Even the smaller and lighter Sony Vaio VGN-T1XP/L has one. I
find these very convenient for backing up projects.

Reviews here:
http://www.anandtech.com/mobile/showdoc.html?i=1809
http://bumblebee.lcs.mit.edu/ibm-x31/

> The X31 is not typical of IBMs since it has a
> built-in firewire slot, so no need for adapters.

Like other laptops it is an unpowered 4 pin IEEE-1394 port. So you
still need to carry an external power adaptor for your Firewire
interface (doing away with one major advantage), and can additionally
worry about the port breaking and the stability of the driver, bus,
etc. I believe a PCMCIA interface to be much more robust.

>I also have live performance in mind, and because of that I'm
>waiting for the Edirol FA-66 firewire 24/96/192 firewire audio module.

Not sure why you need 192KHz for performance. If you wanted a cheap
Firewire interface today with multiple outputs you could get an
M-Audio Firewire Audiophile or FireWire 410. But I wouldn't.

>It has a built-in analog limiter which may fall handy.

Yeah, I can see that. I might use my RNC on the output for live
performance but of course it is not a limiter. Maybe I should see how
I can set up a software limiter at the end of my output chain. This is
easy if everything is routed through Samplitude (just use the built-in
master bus limiter), but I don't see any good way to do it if I am
feeding several sources to the RME. I would need some sort of plugin
at the end of the TotalMix chain itself. Hints anyone?

> It seems the most practical set so I wouldn't spend more for RME stuff.

True, RME costs more, but that money is buying more: drivers and
hardware that you never need to worry about. I don't have much cash
myself, but saved up for a Multiface just so I wouldn't ever have to
say "I'm sorry". :-)

-- robin
Anonymous
March 23, 2005 10:11:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

robin <escalation746@yahoo.com> wrote:

>If I could find such a tiny computer I would be happy with 2-in/2-out
>at 16-bit/44KHz (for recording senario) and 6 channels out for
>playback scenario. Otherwise I'd maybe be happy with a larger form
>factor. (But there are threads already on that.)

If two channels of recording at up to 24/96 (or even 16/192) is enough,
along with two line-level (headphone)outputs, you might consider a PDA
running our PDAudio system rather than a sub-notebook.



--
Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
!