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The Decline of Audio Mags

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Anonymous
March 17, 2005 5:27:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Gang,
Last night I wrote an email to one of the major Audio Industry
magazines. For the purposes of this post it doesn't matter which one,
nor what my complaints were. I was surprised to get a personal reply
from the editor about an hour later. As a reason for dismissing my
point of view, he said that mine was the first comment of its kind he'd
received.

Say what?

I assumed (oops) that magazines with tens of thousands of readers would
get lots of mail - especially as convenient as it is these days to zip
off an email. Apparently not. (This particular magazine prints very
few "letters to the editor," but it may be that they run every one they
get!). Now this is a real shame if you ask me.

Surely I'm not alone in the impression that the overall quality of our
industry rags has declined quite precipitously in recent months. Some
have gone into political hackery and relegated audio to whatever space
is left over; some have become faux counter-culture tracts; and none
seems to care about preserving English as a means of communication..

Like government and wives, we may ultimately get the industry magazines
we deserve. Especially if we don't speak up. Next time you read
something that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand on end,
consider telling the editor your thoughts. After all, these good folks
work for us.

Yours,
Dan Popp
Colors Audio
USA

More about : decline audio mags

Anonymous
March 17, 2005 5:27:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

With the possible exception of tape op, I'm under the impression that
most audio mags are basically gear pimps.

Al

On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 02:27:45 GMT, Dan Popp <ColorsAudio@neo.rr.com>
wrote:

>Gang,
>Last night I wrote an email to one of the major Audio Industry
>magazines. For the purposes of this post it doesn't matter which one,
>nor what my complaints were. I was surprised to get a personal reply
>from the editor about an hour later. As a reason for dismissing my
>point of view, he said that mine was the first comment of its kind he'd
>received.
>
>Say what?
>
>I assumed (oops) that magazines with tens of thousands of readers would
>get lots of mail - especially as convenient as it is these days to zip
>off an email. Apparently not. (This particular magazine prints very
>few "letters to the editor," but it may be that they run every one they
>get!). Now this is a real shame if you ask me.
>
>Surely I'm not alone in the impression that the overall quality of our
>industry rags has declined quite precipitously in recent months. Some
>have gone into political hackery and relegated audio to whatever space
>is left over; some have become faux counter-culture tracts; and none
>seems to care about preserving English as a means of communication..
>
>Like government and wives, we may ultimately get the industry magazines
>we deserve. Especially if we don't speak up. Next time you read
>something that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand on end,
>consider telling the editor your thoughts. After all, these good folks
>work for us.
>
>Yours,
>Dan Popp
>Colors Audio
>USA
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 7:14:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dan Popp wrote:
> Gang,
> Last night I wrote an email to one of the major Audio Industry
> magazines. For the purposes of this post it doesn't matter which one,
> nor what my complaints were. I was surprised to get a personal reply
> from the editor about an hour later. As a reason for dismissing my
> point of view, he said that mine was the first comment of its kind he'd
> received.
>
> Say what?
>
> I assumed (oops) that magazines with tens of thousands of readers would
> get lots of mail - especially as convenient as it is these days to zip
> off an email. Apparently not. (This particular magazine prints very
> few "letters to the editor," but it may be that they run every one they
> get!). Now this is a real shame if you ask me.
>
> Surely I'm not alone in the impression that the overall quality of our
> industry rags has declined quite precipitously in recent months. Some
> have gone into political hackery and relegated audio to whatever space
> is left over; some have become faux counter-culture tracts; and none
> seems to care about preserving English as a means of communication..
>
> Like government and wives, we may ultimately get the industry magazines
> we deserve. Especially if we don't speak up. Next time you read
> something that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand on end,
> consider telling the editor your thoughts. After all, these good folks
> work for us.
>
> Yours,
> Dan Popp
> Colors Audio
> USA
>

I'd guess that it was EQ you were refering to. I was
appalled at some of the "writing" in the most recent
issue. EQ has been on a pretty steady drop lately, but
the current issue fell right off the table. And right
into my trash.

On the other hand, TapeOp has been steadily improving.

--
--
John Noll
Retromedia Sound Studios
Red Bank, NJ

jn145_deletethisfirst_@verizon.net

http://www.retromedia.net
Related resources
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 7:27:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John Noll wrote:

> I was appalled at some of the "writing" in the most recent
> issue.
> On the other hand, TapeOp has been steadily improving.

TapeOp often transcends the elements it covers and in doing so adds life into
the articles.

As for the rest...I don't know...the concept of those magazines is
so..uhh..*yesterday*.<g.

PapaNate
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 7:52:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

E.M.'s cover stories have been driving me batty lately. The recent amp
modelling issue went straight into the trash after a very basic perusal....

I mean, c'mon.... the very cover itself says.... "FAKE !!"

DM

"Dan Popp" <ColorsAudio@neo.rr.com> wrote in message news:4238F041.68A6B6FA@neo.rr.com...
> Gang,
> Last night I wrote an email to one of the major Audio Industry
> magazines. For the purposes of this post it doesn't matter which one,
> nor what my complaints were. I was surprised to get a personal reply
> from the editor about an hour later. As a reason for dismissing my
> point of view, he said that mine was the first comment of its kind he'd
> received.
>
> Say what?
>
> I assumed (oops) that magazines with tens of thousands of readers would
> get lots of mail - especially as convenient as it is these days to zip
> off an email. Apparently not. (This particular magazine prints very
> few "letters to the editor," but it may be that they run every one they
> get!). Now this is a real shame if you ask me.
>
> Surely I'm not alone in the impression that the overall quality of our
> industry rags has declined quite precipitously in recent months. Some
> have gone into political hackery and relegated audio to whatever space
> is left over; some have become faux counter-culture tracts; and none
> seems to care about preserving English as a means of communication..
>
> Like government and wives, we may ultimately get the industry magazines
> we deserve. Especially if we don't speak up. Next time you read
> something that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand on end,
> consider telling the editor your thoughts. After all, these good folks
> work for us.
>
> Yours,
> Dan Popp
> Colors Audio
> USA
>
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 7:52:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Its not easy to find in the USA, but Resolution is the best audio mag
around, no contest. They give the impression that they are the 2nd
coming of the old Studio Sound. They finally went online with most of
their content a couple of months ago.

www.resolutionmag.com
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 9:02:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I can just about lay out the entire year for each and every
magazine...except Tapeop of course....
Here goes...
January...NAMM Preview possibly, or the German Show...I forget the
name.
Feb...How's about a "Recording Drums" issue here.
March...New Gear from NAMM issue.
April...Is it too early in the year for the annual "How to Master Your
Recordings"
May...Latest Soft Synths
June...How to Record Guitars
July...SDC Shootout!!!
Aug...LDC Shootout.
Sept...Adding Life to Vocal Recordings, or How to...
Oct...Mixing Tips and Tricks
Nov...Software Shootout....Cubase, Audition, PT...Which is best?
Dec...Christmas Ideas Under $20, $50 $100 and ?

Did I miss any critical issues?
later,
m
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 10:30:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"John Noll" <jn145_deletethisfirst_@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:423901C5.7080103@verizon.net

> I'd guess that it was EQ you were refering to. I was
> appalled at some of the "writing" in the most recent
> issue. EQ has been on a pretty steady drop lately, but
> the current issue fell right off the table. And right
> into my trash.

I found a recent copy of EQ at an audio club meeting last weekend. At least
one of the feature articles was bad technically that were it posted here, it
would have been ripped to shreds in hours.
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 11:50:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John Noll wrote:
> Dan Popp wrote:
> > Gang,
> > Last night I wrote an email to one of the major Audio Industry
> > magazines. For the purposes of this post it doesn't matter which
one,
> > nor what my complaints were. I was surprised to get a personal
reply
> > from the editor about an hour later. As a reason for dismissing my
> > point of view, he said that mine was the first comment of its kind
he'd
> > received.
> >
> > Say what?
> >
> > I assumed (oops) that magazines with tens of thousands of readers
would
> > get lots of mail - especially as convenient as it is these days to
zip
> > off an email. Apparently not. (This particular magazine prints
very
> > few "letters to the editor," but it may be that they run every one
they
> > get!). Now this is a real shame if you ask me.
> >
> > Surely I'm not alone in the impression that the overall quality of
our
> > industry rags has declined quite precipitously in recent months.
Some
> > have gone into political hackery and relegated audio to whatever
space
> > is left over; some have become faux counter-culture tracts; and
none
> > seems to care about preserving English as a means of
communication..
> >
> > Like government and wives, we may ultimately get the industry
magazines
> > we deserve. Especially if we don't speak up. Next time you read
> > something that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand on
end,
> > consider telling the editor your thoughts. After all, these good
folks
> > work for us.
> >
> > Yours,
> > Dan Popp
> > Colors Audio
> > USA
> >
>
> I'd guess that it was EQ you were refering to. I was
> appalled at some of the "writing" in the most recent
> issue. EQ has been on a pretty steady drop lately, but
> the current issue fell right off the table. And right
> into my trash.
>
> On the other hand, TapeOp has been steadily improving.
>
> --
> --

I do know that there have been some "changes" at EQ, including taking
their former editor, Mitch Gallagher, and their resident guru Craig
Anderton off the payroll and making them "freelancers". They have a new
editor who is not from the audio industry... sound familiar? Seems to
be a trend for companys to try to improve the bottom line this way.
Inevitably it backfires and they'll either close the magazine or wake
up and realize what's going on...

To a large extent, EQ has always pimped gear and been very marketing
focused. However, what's kept them alive IMO is decent editorial and
general eye candy (remember those cool photos they used to do with
vintage and rare microphones? I think it was called "MicroPhile" or
something like that).

All that being said, I think the publishing industry has suffered quite
a bit since 9/11/01 and probably even before that. Advertisers have
looked at many different alternative means of reaching their audiences,
not the least of which is the Web. So while some are going the way of
EQ, i.e. the "corporate fix", some are reinventing themselves to find
new ways to be viable (like Tape Op). Kinda similar to business in
general, no?

Karl Winkler
Lectrosonics, Inc.
http://www.lectrosonics.com
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 12:26:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dan Popp <ColorsAudio@neo.rr.com> wrote:
>
>Surely I'm not alone in the impression that the overall quality of our
>industry rags has declined quite precipitously in recent months. Some
>have gone into political hackery and relegated audio to whatever space
>is left over; some have become faux counter-culture tracts; and none
>seems to care about preserving English as a means of communication..

Recent months? I think things declined when R/E/P went away and nothing
has been the same since.

>Like government and wives, we may ultimately get the industry magazines
>we deserve. Especially if we don't speak up. Next time you read
>something that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand on end,
>consider telling the editor your thoughts. After all, these good folks
>work for us.

I can say that since 9-11, the page count on the various magazines that I
write for has been reduced substantially in order to cut costs, because
advertising revenue is down and newsstand sales are down. Everybody is
trying to find some way to shave a dime and folks are accepting some
advertising that they might not otherwise have taken. One of of the small
press high end publications that I write for may or may not even still exist.
I can't get a straight answer out of them whether the next quarterly issue
is coming out or not.

By all means, write in, but don't forget to buy magazines either.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 12:26:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <d1c43i$4t7$1@panix2.panix.com>, kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey)
wrote:

>
> By all means, write in, but don't forget to buy magazines either.
> --scott

Buy? They fall all over themselves giving them away! Frankly I wouldn't pay
for any of them. Take a look at an old issue of Recording Engineer & Producer
and then tell me there are any decent audio recording publications left.


-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 1:29:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <4238F041.68A6B6FA@neo.rr.com> ColorsAudio@neo.rr.com writes:

> Last night I wrote an email to one of the major Audio Industry
> magazines. For the purposes of this post it doesn't matter which one,
> nor what my complaints were. I was surprised to get a personal reply
> from the editor about an hour later. As a reason for dismissing my
> point of view, he said that mine was the first comment of its kind he'd
> received.

Well, maybe it was.

I wrote to Mix a few months back commenting on an article and didn't
hear back from them at all. Then someone told me they say my letter
published.

> Surely I'm not alone in the impression that the overall quality of our
> industry rags has declined quite precipitously in recent months.

Well, to be fair, the majority of the readership turns over every
couple of years. People decide they're really not going to get that
major label contract with the $2,000 worth of gear they bought from
the audio mag advertisers. People learn the basics after reading for a
couple of years and realize that the next step is getting creative on
their own. New people start reading the magazine and don't want to
read about air particles impinging on a microphone diaphragm causing
self noise, they want to know which $99 LDC is quiet enough to make a
professional CD. So the level gradually migrates over a fairly small
range. You can't stick with the same magazine forever.

Time to move on. You may even be able to get a refund on your
subscription if you paid for it.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 1:29:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <423901C5.7080103@verizon.net> jn145_deletethisfirst_@verizon.net writes:

> On the other hand, TapeOp has been steadily improving.

Well, it's getting bigger, so there's more room for stuff you might
like to read. In the latest issue, John's back page editorial pretty
much explained where the magazine is going, like it or not. He said
that it's not about the gear, the technology, or the techniques, it's
about the people who do the work. They want to publish pictures, and
a picture of a microphone repair tech petting his dog is more
important than a close-up of the inside of a mic that's on his
workbench.

If that's what turns you one, then it's improving. I know that every
time I mention Tape Op it sounds like I'm ragging on them. I still
enjoy reading it, but I don't feel that I learn anything from it, so
it has a different kind of value to me than some other magazines.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 1:29:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1111035809.032802.251190@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> lex125@pacbell.net writes:

> Its not easy to find in the USA, but Resolution is the best audio mag
> around, no contest. They give the impression that they are the 2nd
> coming of the old Studio Sound.

It really is. I wish they could get to the level where they offer free
subscriptions in the US, but I find the price over here to be
prohibitive for me - not that I can't afford it, but that I don't want
to.

I didn't know that they had significant content on line. I'll have to
check it out and maybe if I see something I really want to read, I'll
print it. They were distributing some "teaser" CDs when they first
started publishing but I could never stand to read those on my
computer.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 3:22:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1111068164.941041.12000@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> mwood5nospam@yahoo.com writes:

> Did I miss any critical issues?

Monitor shootout.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 6:13:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

After all, these good folks
> work for us.

Critiques of editorial content notwithstanding, your argument is flawed, as
the above statement just isn't true. Almost all magazines work for the
advertisers that spend the big bucks advertising. This of course presents
an almost inevitable sway in editorial content to favor said advertisers,
sometimes deliberate, sometimes unconsciously.

Don't bother pointing out exceptions, that isn't the point.

JHH
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 6:29:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Arny Krueger wrote:

> "John Noll" wrote:

> > I'd guess that it was EQ you were refering to. I was
> > appalled at some of the "writing" in the most recent
> > issue. EQ has been on a pretty steady drop lately, but
> > the current issue fell right off the table. And right
> > into my trash.

> I found a recent copy of EQ at an audio club meeting last weekend. At least
> one of the feature articles was bad technically that were it posted here, it
> would have been ripped to shreds in hours.

_EQ_ is over. I wrote "No" in the "ya still want this for FREE?" box.

--
ha
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 6:40:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

> By all means, write in, but don't forget to buy magazines either.

And by all means, stop buying them, even if they're free, when they are
obviously no longer worth the trees murdered to hold the ink.

--
ha
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 6:47:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

play on <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote:
>With the possible exception of tape op, I'm under the impression that
>most audio mags are basically gear pimps.

Audio/Media isn't. Recording isn't THAT much of one. Electronic Musician
is also less of one than most of the others.

There are other small market magazines like Tape Op that mostly cater to
the vintage audio community, like Sound Practices and Vacuum Tube Valley.
And there is AudioExpress which is a new incarnation of the old Audio
Amateur.

But none of them are R/E/P.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 9:05:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
news:D 1c43i$4t7$1@panix2.panix.com...

> I can say that since 9-11, the page count on the various magazines that I
> write for has been reduced substantially in order to cut costs, because
> advertising revenue is down and newsstand sales are down. Everybody is
> trying to find some way to shave a dime and folks are accepting some
> advertising that they might not otherwise have taken.

According to editors at both of the magazines I write for, a lot of the
advertisers have decided to put more of their advertising dollars into
websites rather than magazines, seeing more immediate paybacks.

As Scott says, this means page counts are down, so the news hole is smaller.
If the news hole is smaller, there are two ways an editor can deal with
that. One is to keep articles the same length, but buy fewer of them. The
other is to buy the same number of articles, but make them shorter (and
usually shallower as a result). Most editors will choose the latter course,
because they want to maintain the variety of articles -- a magazine with 8
features in it will stand a better chance of appealing to a newsstand buyer
than one with 4 features, because there's twice the possibility of finding a
topic that appeals to a particular reader. Whether the shorter article
satisfies the buyer is, of course, a whole 'nother question.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 9:20:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 06:02:44 -0800, mwood5nospam wrote:

> I can just about lay out the entire year for each and every
> magazine...except Tapeop of course....
> Here goes...
> January...NAMM Preview possibly, or the German Show...I forget the
> name.
> Feb...How's about a "Recording Drums" issue here.
> March...New Gear from NAMM issue.
> April...Is it too early in the year for the annual "How to Master Your
> Recordings"
> May...Latest Soft Synths
> June...How to Record Guitars
> July...SDC Shootout!!!
> Aug...LDC Shootout.
> Sept...Adding Life to Vocal Recordings, or How to...
> Oct...Mixing Tips and Tricks
> Nov...Software Shootout....Cubase, Audition, PT...Which is best?
> Dec...Christmas Ideas Under $20, $50 $100 and ?

How accurate, yet depressing.

I would like to see a magazine with articles such as:
'How to avoid buying new gear!'
'Analysis of the best pop arrangements of the past year, and how the
production backed them up.'
'PRS, MCPS, PPL, MU, PAMRA? What are they, and which are essential?'
'How much do studios charge in your area, and are you charging too little?'
'Long term archiving techniques'

I guess I won't see those articles as they would take a great deal of
research and knowledge compared to reviewing soft synths.
Sigh. Back to google groups archive and rec.audio.pro. :) 




>
> Did I miss any critical issues?
> later,
> m
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 9:37:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <pFj_d.406017$w62.239291@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net> pstamlerhell@pobox.com writes:

> As Scott says, this means page counts are down, so the news hole is smaller.
> If the news hole is smaller, there are two ways an editor can deal with
> that. One is to keep articles the same length, but buy fewer of them. The
> other is to buy the same number of articles, but make them shorter (and
> usually shallower as a result). Most editors will choose the latter course,
> because they want to maintain the variety of articles

When I was first approached about writing for Recording, I told the
editor at the time, Nick Batzdorf, that I felt that most magazine
articles about technical subjects in the magazines I read (I wasn't a
regular Recording reader at the time) were too short to really provide
much information, that I wanted to be able to write articles that were
long enough to cover the subject comfortably and not leave the reader
looking for something else. Nick was fair enough to allow me that
freedom and did very little to restrict what I wrote, either in size
or scope. I, in turn, tried to pick subjects that I could cover in
less than about 50% more than the space that he really wanted.

Today, I'm not writing as much for a couple of reasons. First, I
figure I've already said about all I know about on subjects I feel
comfortable covering. It's still important that people read about
those things, and there are new authors who are covering many of the
same subjects with their own style and spin. So at least many of the
fundamentals that I think are important are still being covered every
couple of years so they'll be available to the newcomers.

Second, the current editor is more fussy about length and frequently
asks me to shorten articles. It's frustrating to have to take out
stuff that you think is important.

If you'd like to read a couple of my reviews that were too long for
anybody to publish (the TASCAM US-122 review appeared in Recording in
a shortened form) you can visit my dinky little web page that I set up
because it was free and it gave me a place to put some stuff that I
wanted to pass along. http://mysite.verizon.net/mikerivers




-- a magazine with 8
> features in it will stand a better chance of appealing to a newsstand buyer
> than one with 4 features, because there's twice the possibility of finding a
> topic that appeals to a particular reader. Whether the shorter article
> satisfies the buyer is, of course, a whole 'nother question.
>
> Peace,
> Paul
>
>

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 9:37:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <pan.2005.03.18.18.22.06.739688@localhost.com> philicorda@localhost.com writes:

> I would like to see a magazine with articles such as:
> 'How to avoid buying new gear!'

I sort of wrote that one. It was the last article in my Oops Wrong
Button series in Recording, in which I encouraged people to try
breaking the "unlimited number of tracks" habit and recording an
8-track project (with lots of info on how to make it sound like more
tracks, but emphasizing the importance of alwys having the end product
in mind)

> 'Analysis of the best pop arrangements of the past year, and how the
> production backed them up.'

I see a lot of articles about pop recordings, but I find that i get
little useful information about them. That's a good idea, though, if
treated right.

> 'PRS, MCPS, PPL, MU, PAMRA? What are they, and which are essential?'

Yeah, I'd like to know that, too. Paul Reed Smith, Mega Cycles Per
Second, P-Pop Limiter, A kind of metal used for magnetic shielding,
and a coffee beverage?

> 'How much do studios charge in your area, and are you charging too little?'

Mix used to do that a long time ago. Today it's too hard to define
what a studio is.

> 'Long term archiving techniques'

Dave Martin wrote an article about that in, I think, Audio Media. Come
to think of it, I haven't seen an issue of Audio Media in about a
year. Did it go under, or did I miss another subscription renewal
notice?

What I want to know is why is it so hard to read the publication date
on the cover or spine of most magazines? I have a shelf full of magazines
and when I'm looking for a specific issue, I often have to search all over
the cover to see where I'm at in the stack.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 11:54:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"philicorda" <philicorda@localhost.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.03.18.18.22.06.739688@localhost.com...
>
> I would like to see a magazine with articles such as:
> 'How to avoid buying new gear!'
> 'Analysis of the best pop arrangements of the past year, and how the
> production backed them up.'
> 'PRS, MCPS, PPL, MU, PAMRA? What are they, and which are essential?'
> 'How much do studios charge in your area, and are you charging too
little?'
> 'Long term archiving techniques'

I wrote a two-parter covering archiving techniques for "Recording". Others
have written about how much to charge.

The others...no, they haven't showed up much.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 12:29:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 20:54:36 +0000, Paul Stamler wrote:

> "philicorda" <philicorda@localhost.com> wrote in message
> news:p an.2005.03.18.18.22.06.739688@localhost.com...
>>
>> I would like to see a magazine with articles such as:
>> 'How to avoid buying new gear!'
>> 'Analysis of the best pop arrangements of the past year, and how the
>> production backed them up.'
>> 'PRS, MCPS, PPL, MU, PAMRA? What are they, and which are essential?'
>> 'How much do studios charge in your area, and are you charging too
> little?'
>> 'Long term archiving techniques'
>
> I wrote a two-parter covering archiving techniques for "Recording". Others
> have written about how much to charge.

Which issue(s) were the articles on archiving in?

>
> The others...no, they haven't showed up much.
>
> Peace,
> Paul
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 1:17:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John,
Please explain how a magazine with zero readers would retain advertisers.

Yours,
Dan Popp
Colors Audio
USA

John Halliburton wrote:

> After all, these good folks
> > work for us.
>
> Critiques of editorial content notwithstanding, your argument is flawed, as
> the above statement just isn't true. Almost all magazines work for the
> advertisers that spend the big bucks advertising. This of course presents
> an almost inevitable sway in editorial content to favor said advertisers,
> sometimes deliberate, sometimes unconsciously.
>
> Don't bother pointing out exceptions, that isn't the point.
>
> JHH
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 1:17:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dan Popp <ColorsAudio@neo.rr.com> wrote:
>John,
>Please explain how a magazine with zero readers would retain advertisers.

By faking their distribution figures, which is what some of the free
magazines in the past have done. The more reputable ones have independant
auditing of subscribers by BPA or some similar organization but not all of
them do. And the auditing is no guarantee.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:57:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

> Dan Popp <ColorsAudio@neo.rr.com> wrote:
> >John,
> >Please explain how a magazine with zero readers would retain advertisers.
>
> By faking their distribution figures, which is what some of the free
> magazines in the past have done. The more reputable ones have independant
> auditing of subscribers by BPA or some similar organization but not all of
> them do. And the auditing is no guarantee.
> --scott

Scott,
I'm sure you didn't mean that a magazine with absolutely no circulation could
fake a readership of hundreds of thousands and keep up this fraud forever. I
don't doubt that shenanigans go on, but as Lincoln said, "You can't fool all
the people all of the time." Advertisers are paying money, ultimately, to
get results. No readers = no results = no advertisers = no magazine. We have
both met people like John who seem to cynically believe that the "real"
product is the advertising. Instead the real product is indeed the product
(the magazine, the race car, the radio station). That product's success in
the marketplace - how well it meets the needs of the consumer - will determine
how successful the advertising can be. In the end, readers are in control,
despite the fakery you mentioned.

Yours,
Dan Popp
Colors Audio
USA
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 3:30:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 18:37:32 -0500, Mike Rivers wrote:

>
> In article <pan.2005.03.18.18.22.06.739688@localhost.com> philicorda@localhost.com writes:
>
>> I would like to see a magazine with articles such as:
>> 'How to avoid buying new gear!'
>
> I sort of wrote that one. It was the last article in my Oops Wrong
> Button series in Recording, in which I encouraged people to try
> breaking the "unlimited number of tracks" habit and recording an
> 8-track project (with lots of info on how to make it sound like more
> tracks, but emphasizing the importance of alwys having the end product
> in mind)

That's the kind of thing I want to read.
Looks like a subscription to 'Recording' is in order. (And a few back
issues.)

>
>> 'Analysis of the best pop arrangements of the past year, and how the
>> production backed them up.'
>
> I see a lot of articles about pop recordings, but I find that i get
> little useful information about them. That's a good idea, though, if
> treated right.

I would really like to read articles and analysis of more traditional pop
string/brass arranging too. There must be a load of other people out there
who are not scared of a little music theory as well.

>
>> 'PRS, MCPS, PPL, MU, PAMRA? What are they, and which are essential?'
>
> Yeah, I'd like to know that, too. Paul Reed Smith, Mega Cycles Per
> Second, P-Pop Limiter, A kind of metal used for magnetic shielding, and
> a coffee beverage?

Hehe! They are all organisations that deal with royalties and things in
the UK. I seem to be ending up with points on some tracks nowadays, and
though I am PRS registered, apparently I need to contact some other
acronyms and register as well. I think they weigh the amount of paperwork
you send them and pay out accordingly.
As the lines between engineer/producer/artists are getting so blurred I
figure I should understand this stuff.

>
>> 'How much do studios charge in your area, and are you charging too
>> little?'
>
> Mix used to do that a long time ago. Today it's too hard to define what
> a studio is.

Well, a survey and some examples would be handy all the same.

>
>> 'Long term archiving techniques'
>
> Dave Martin wrote an article about that in, I think, Audio Media. Come
> to think of it, I haven't seen an issue of Audio Media in about a year.
> Did it go under, or did I miss another subscription renewal notice?

I used to read Audio Media in my local library. It has vanished from there.

>
> What I want to know is why is it so hard to read the publication date on
> the cover or spine of most magazines? I have a shelf full of magazines
> and when I'm looking for a specific issue, I often have to search all
> over the cover to see where I'm at in the stack.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 9:37:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"philicorda" <philicorda@localhost.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.03.18.21.32.19.273856@localhost.com...

> > I wrote a two-parter covering archiving techniques for "Recording".
Others
> > have written about how much to charge.
>
> Which issue(s) were the articles on archiving in?

Geez...I'm embarrassed to say that I don't know, because although I know
they're here someplace, I can't find them. Sometime in 2001, I'd guess. The
title was "Making It Last".

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 10:13:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <pan.2005.03.19.00.32.51.261520@localhost.com> philicorda@localhost.com writes:

> That's the kind of thing I want to read.
> Looks like a subscription to 'Recording' is in order. (And a few back
> issues.)

Not to speak ill of the hand that feeds me (or more like buys a beer
now and then), but for me, about 50% of the issues of Recording these
days don't have but one or two articles of interest. But some are
nearly 100% worth reading. I suspect that this is true for just about
everyone (and just about every magazine) and we're all looking for
something different. But I'll bet everyone here would love reading
every issue of R/E/P cover to cover. I got ideas for some of my best
articles from going through my old collection.

> I would really like to read articles and analysis of more traditional pop
> string/brass arranging too. There must be a load of other people out there
> who are not scared of a little music theory as well.

Electronic Musician used to have a regular column about theory where
they would take apart a pop arrangement every issue. Maybe you should
write to the editor and ask to have it revived.

> >> 'PRS, MCPS, PPL, MU, PAMRA? What are they, and which are essential?'

> Hehe! They are all organisations that deal with royalties and things in
> the UK.

No wonder I didn't recognize any of them. I know ASCAP, BMI, and CESAC
(but not sure what that stands for [Canadian] so not sure how to spell
it). Generally when there's an article about the business of music, it
has to do with obtaining a copyright, but you never read what to do if
you find that someone has stolen your work (or any success stories of
someone who's been that lucky).


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 11:15:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Jay Kadis" <jay@ccrma.stanford.edu> wrote in message
news:jay-7ECDA2.07353517032005@news.stanford.edu...
> In article <d1c43i$4t7$1@panix2.panix.com>, kludge@panix.com (Scott
> Dorsey)
> wrote:
>
>>
>> By all means, write in, but don't forget to buy magazines either.
>> --scott
>
> Buy? They fall all over themselves giving them away! Frankly I wouldn't
> pay
> for any of them. Take a look at an old issue of Recording Engineer &
> Producer
> and then tell me there are any decent audio recording publications left.


Sound On Sound.

geoff
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 4:01:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"philicorda" <philicorda@localhost.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.03.19.00.32.51.261520@localhost.com...
> On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 18:37:32 -0500, Mike Rivers
wrote:
> >
> > Dave Martin wrote an article about that in, I think, Audio Media. Come
> > to think of it, I haven't seen an issue of Audio Media in about a year.
> > Did it go under, or did I miss another subscription renewal notice?
>
> I used to read Audio Media in my local library. It has vanished from
there.


I received a copy last week, regularly. February issue, European edition.

It's still a decent magazine.

Predrag
March 18, 2005 6:14:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Heck, the box set of.. What the heck... Pet Sounds?... brain... (more
coffee...) with all the pre-finish spec mixes and such is just jaw=dropping
in both hearing isolated parts AND in the look at what a gestalt genius
Wilson is about just simply 'knowing' what it all needs to be down to the
least interlocked piece.
I keep going back and just listening/studying anything by TOTO, Motown
collections, Tchaikovsky, like going to the museum to just sit and stare and
study Renoir or Rembrandt.


On 3/17/05 7:30 PM, in article pan.2005.03.19.00.32.51.261520@localhost.com,
"philicorda" <philicorda@localhost.com> wrote:

>>> 'Analysis of the best pop arrangements of the past year, and how the
>>> production backed them up.'
>>
>> I see a lot of articles about pop recordings, but I find that i get
>> little useful information about them. That's a good idea, though, if
>> treated right.
>
> I would really like to read articles and analysis of more traditional pop
> string/brass arranging too. There must be a load of other people out there
> who are not scared of a little music theory as well.
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 8:28:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 00:30:22 GMT, philicorda <philicorda@localhost.com>
wrote:

> On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 18:37:32 -0500, Mike Rivers wrote:
>
>>

>>
>>> 'PRS, MCPS, PPL, MU, PAMRA? What are they, and which are essential?'
>>
>> Yeah, I'd like to know that, too. Paul Reed Smith, Mega Cycles Per
>> Second, P-Pop Limiter, A kind of metal used for magnetic shielding, and
>> a coffee beverage?
>
> Hehe! They are all organisations that deal with royalties and things in
> the UK. I seem to be ending up with points on some tracks nowadays, and
> though I am PRS registered, apparently I need to contact some other
> acronyms and register as well. I think they weigh the amount of paperwork
> you send them and pay out accordingly.
> As the lines between engineer/producer/artists are getting so blurred I
> figure I should understand this stuff.
>

There are plenty of people in a similar position to you on the Sound On
Sound forum - try visiting http://www.soundonsound.com and going to the
Music Business forum if you need some help.


>>> 'Long term archiving techniques'
>>
>> Dave Martin wrote an article about that in, I think, Audio Media. Come
>> to think of it, I haven't seen an issue of Audio Media in about a year.
>> Did it go under, or did I miss another subscription renewal notice?
>
> I used to read Audio Media in my local library. It has vanished from
> there.

I got the latest issue last week with Nuendo 3 featured on the cover.

Cheers.

James.
!