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Wireless erase question

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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February 22, 2013 10:43:13 PM

There is pcA and a pcB in a home network. I have wireless access from pcA to pcB via shared files (pcA reads files of pcB).
If I delete a file of pcB from pcA, where will the deleted file go? To recycle.bin of pcA, to recycle.bin of pcB, or nowhere?
a c 203 F Wireless
February 23, 2013 2:59:52 PM

In Windows XP through 7 (and I assume still with 8 until determined otherwise) deleted network files are simply deleted. If you want them to go to the trash of the computer where they reside, instead of deleting the file, drag the file to the trash can and it will reside there until emptied on that machine.
February 23, 2013 5:20:50 PM

Forgot to say I m talking for Win7-64.

I need to know which disk receives the deletion, because one of them is ssd.

In both system's recycle.bin there is nothing apparent.

So your answer is "non of the 2 recycle.bin"?
Thats seems to be good. Does this mean less wear for the disks?
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a c 203 F Wireless
February 23, 2013 5:33:19 PM

Neither of the recycle bins will get the file when done as a network erase, it is erased as if you had recycle bin turned off. I doubt that there is really much difference in wear.
February 23, 2013 5:41:10 PM

In your local disk you need to erase 2 times, right? One to go to recycle.bin, another one from recycle.bin
But if u erase only once, u get less wear(I guess).
a b F Wireless
February 23, 2013 5:51:01 PM

You do know that files are not actually erased unless you use a utility to do it. All that happens is the first point to the file is marked as deleted and all the disk blocks are placed back on the free list....this is why you can undelete files. When you move file to the recycle bin it does not actually move anything other than the pointer to file descriptor from one directory to another. It is almost no i/o to do most these operations so from a wear standpoint it is trivial compared to the creation of a file where you are actually storing the data part of the file.
February 23, 2013 8:37:02 PM

Yes, I know all these, can u now get to the point,

if i delete via a wireless shared file of another pc, will the deleted file disappear forever?
Does this mean no wear for the disk?

If not disappear forever, then which disk has it?
a c 203 F Wireless
February 24, 2013 12:28:19 AM

As I said in my first reply:

In Windows XP through 7 (and I assume still with 8 until determined otherwise) deleted network files are SIMPLY DELETED. If you want them to go to the trash of the computer where they reside, instead of deleting the file, drag the file to the trash can and it will reside there until emptied on that machine.

The file will "disappear" but still is actually recoverable from the drive where it was stored with Recuva or other recovery software. It does NOT go to the recycle bin anywhere, it is just marked by the drive as available space and will be written over in due time.
February 24, 2013 10:12:20 AM

RealBeast said:
As I said in my first reply:

In Windows XP through 7 (and I assume still with 8 until determined otherwise) deleted network files are SIMPLY DELETED. If you want them to go to the trash of the computer where they reside, instead of deleting the file, drag the file to the trash can and it will reside there until emptied on that machine.

The file will "disappear" but still is actually recoverable from the drive where it was stored with Recuva or other recovery software. It does NOT go to the recycle bin anywhere, it is just marked by the drive as available space and will be written over in due time.


My friend...

My point is not to have it in the recycle.bin or to recover, but to wear as less as possible the disk(ssd).
So the file will disappear but in fact it will remain in its original disk, right?
Are you 100% sure about this? I need to know if the deleted file goes to the disk of pcA or to the disk of pcB.
[I delete the file of pcB from pcA via shared file].
a b F Wireless
February 24, 2013 10:31:45 AM

You say you understand how files are stored and how they are erased then why would you even think they ever reside on the machine that is remotely accessing them.
February 24, 2013 11:47:14 AM

What?
Can u just get to the point? The wear of an ssd is an important matter.
February 27, 2013 5:03:06 AM

So no answer... U r not quite sure?
Can some1 else help?
a c 203 F Wireless
February 27, 2013 12:26:53 PM

koilada said:
So no answer... U r not quite sure?
Can some1 else help?
You got many answers, unfortunately you lack the ability to comprehend.
!