#777 / Laptop / Booted from SprinPCS?

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

My wife and I recently purchased our first laptop. We also got the
cable from Radio Shack to connect my Vision-enabled phone to the laptop
so that while we are at our cabin and elsewhere on the road we can get
internet access.

I did consider getting a "legit" plan from Sprint, but the cost was way
to high.

My question is this: Have you ever been cautioned/charged by Sprint for
doing this, or have you ever heard of anyone actually get
booted/charged? I've read around on the internet and it seems that
most people say something along the lines of "Don't abuse it and it
will be okay", but I am looking for something a little firmer than
that.

Any insights would be greatly appreciated.

~Joe
27 answers Last reply
More about laptop booted sprinpcs
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    <joehatesspam@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1109965934.905588.55290@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
    > My wife and I recently purchased our first laptop. We also got the
    > cable from Radio Shack to connect my Vision-enabled phone to the laptop
    > so that while we are at our cabin and elsewhere on the road we can get
    > internet access.
    >
    > I did consider getting a "legit" plan from Sprint, but the cost was way
    > to high.
    >
    > My question is this: Have you ever been cautioned/charged by Sprint for
    > doing this, or have you ever heard of anyone actually get
    > booted/charged? I've read around on the internet and it seems that
    > most people say something along the lines of "Don't abuse it and it
    > will be okay", but I am looking for something a little firmer than
    > that.
    >
    > Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > ~Joe

    That is as firm and timely as we can get around here. Nothing is etched in
    stone, save that SPCS doesn't allow it, and we folks have been keeping under
    the radar. There were one or two individuals here who say they got hit with
    charges months, maybe even a year ago and that's about it.

    Best advice is to keep your usage down to an hour or less each day.

    Bob
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    <joehatesspam@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1109965934.905588.55290@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
    > My wife and I recently purchased our first laptop. We also got the
    > cable from Radio Shack to connect my Vision-enabled phone to the laptop
    > so that while we are at our cabin and elsewhere on the road we can get
    > internet access.
    >
    > I did consider getting a "legit" plan from Sprint, but the cost was way
    > to high.
    >
    > My question is this: Have you ever been cautioned/charged by Sprint for
    > doing this, or have you ever heard of anyone actually get
    > booted/charged? I've read around on the internet and it seems that
    > most people say something along the lines of "Don't abuse it and it
    > will be okay", but I am looking for something a little firmer than
    > that.
    >

    You may want to go have a look through the posts at sprintusers.com, under
    the computer/pda connectivity forum, there has been some good discussion on
    this recently.

    The short answer is I have yet to see a post from someone who got nailed.
    However, there are several recent posts in that forum from people who say
    they either are or recently were working for Sprint who speak about this.

    What they say is that Sprint is keeping an eye out on for users that seem
    to use excessive band width and they regularly nail people. One person
    reported that in one case that they would send out notices to apparent
    violaters to stop or else their vision service would be terminated. Other
    such reputed Sprint employees said they had sent out bills to people for $$
    for excess data use. Such posters also seem to say that Sprints enforcement
    is kind of hit or miss, some they catch, some they don't.

    I have yet to see a post from someone who said they got nailed and for how
    much. (Which doesn't mean no one has been nailed) I continue to see posts
    from people who say "we done it hunerts of times an' 'taint nuthin happen
    atoll"

    Myself, I have tried doing the tether a few times on both of our phones and
    have not gotten billed. The excess data usage rate charge from Sprint is
    unknown, they don't seem to publish this. But I also have an AT&T gsm
    phone, and they tell you up front tethered laptop usage is a nickel a
    kilobyte. The cost of 50 megs tethered usage with those guys would be
    $2,560 (50 x 1024 x 0.05)

    Myself, I quit doing the tether, bought the card, and pay the $80 a month
    unlimited usage plan. That may not be practical for everyone, but, I use
    mine on the road ALOT now, all business. File uploads, downloads, even
    simple web browsing, uses alot of bandwidth. Don't need no surprises in my
    bill.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    How well does the Sprint laptop card and service function? I currently have
    a Verizon laptop card that does not work at my home, I recently ported my
    cell phone from Verizon to Sprint and am very satisfied. I am thinking about
    switching to the Sprint laptop card. What are the opinions on the card and
    the service?

    Thanks,

    -mij
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 21:38:38 -0800, Mij Adyaw wrote:

    > How well does the Sprint laptop card and service function? I currently have
    > a Verizon laptop card that does not work at my home, I recently ported my
    > cell phone from Verizon to Sprint and am very satisfied. I am thinking about
    > switching to the Sprint laptop card. What are the opinions on the card and
    > the service?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > -mij

    Well the cards from sprintpcs and verizon are the same quality wise, they
    do use same manufactures for some and the same network design. The major
    issue I have had with verizon is spotty coverage. They recently(a year?)
    rolled out ev-do connectivity which I tested when they were doing trials
    in Washington DC. When verizon rolls out services they tend to do it
    slowly region by region unlike sprintpcs who tend to do most upgrades up
    front then flip the switch. I travel a lot and as long as I have a digital
    sprintpcs signal I can get on with vision/tethered laptop. I can not say
    the same thing with verizon. This is not to say sprintpcs' coverage is
    great but usually when I have it, it works.

    When comparing their pc connection cards they are really equal and sadly
    the cards do not have as great a reception as the phones, correct me if
    I'm wrong I haven't used the latest and greatest from sprintpcs. The
    Biggest issues I had with the cards were with soft hand-off, I would get
    disconnected on the train while it was moving between towers. While
    tethered to my sprintpcs phone I would remain connected most of the way,
    except for dead spots that had no signal. Same can be said about verizon's
    tethered usage. Where I was staying the cards had poor signal indoors
    compared to the sprintpcs/verizon phones I had.

    Personally I love the cards and have been thinking about re-signing up for
    either the CF or SDIO card(which ever they sell now) so I can use it with
    my pda instead of tethering the pda to my phone(clunky). Even tho the
    cards reception quality can be poor they did work when they had good
    signal. Some might wonder why I do not get a smartphone and the reason is
    I want to keep the two separate and with a CF/SD card I can always change
    the pda(I like keeping my pda choices separate from what sprintpcs chooses
    to sell me) and even use it in the laptop with a cardbus adaptor. Usually
    I would need it when I have to fix a server problem via ssh which usually
    requires me to be sitting still(use a portable keyboard) so finding a spot
    I can get good signal at wouldn't be a major issue esp since I won't be
    moving for a while.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    "Mij Adyaw" <mijadyaw@nospamforme.com> wrote in message
    news:yNRWd.96799$bu.38381@fed1read06...
    > How well does the Sprint laptop card and service function?

    I am very pleased with the card and service. Any place my sprint phone
    works in CDMA mode on the Sprint network, my card works. Conersely where
    your phone goes into analog mode or shows digtial roam, it does not work.
    However, locally coverage is excellent. Except in my home, neither my phone
    nor my cell modem card works. I have good coverage out of state too, but,
    check coverage maps first.

    It holds the connection even with weak signals, transfer rates are generally
    pretty fast for cell connections, as measured by FTP transfer, I usually
    get about 9-11 kbytes sec (say 90 kbs) . Connections are usually stable,
    and rarely drop. In some parts of the country like Vermont I have gotten
    slower speeds, but 90 kbs is the norm.

    Web pages images are compressed, meaning, they are not as sharp and clear as
    they would be on a normal connection. They are quite viewable, but you will
    notice a difference. But my use of the service is not for fun, its
    business, and this aspect of the service is of little importance to me.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    thanks all so much for your reponses... (esp from Frank with the
    sprintusers.com link).

    It sounds like the number floating around is 150-200MB max per month.

    Thanks!
    Joe


    joehatesspam@gmail.com wrote:
    > My wife and I recently purchased our first laptop. We also got the
    > cable from Radio Shack to connect my Vision-enabled phone to the
    laptop
    > so that while we are at our cabin and elsewhere on the road we can
    get
    > internet access.
    >
    > I did consider getting a "legit" plan from Sprint, but the cost was
    way
    > to high.
    >
    > My question is this: Have you ever been cautioned/charged by Sprint
    for
    > doing this, or have you ever heard of anyone actually get
    > booted/charged? I've read around on the internet and it seems that
    > most people say something along the lines of "Don't abuse it and it
    > will be okay", but I am looking for something a little firmer than
    > that.
    >
    > Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > ~Joe
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    "Steph" <CUT_skipatrol@hotmail.com_CUT> wrote in message
    news:Xns961263B674C5Fskipatroluunet@66.75.43.157...

    > Hmm.. I *know* I posted my experience on this.
    > My wife and I used our new vision phones for very little for about 6
    > months with no effects, then we got nailed for virtually every minute.
    > SPCS took off the charges the first month without much hassle, but we
    > had already used close to an hour's worth in the next month.
    >
    > I had more trouble dealing with those charges and have since not used
    > the tethered mode. Luckily I have either had Wi-Fi or wired ethernet
    > available to me when travelling -- and it not free it was covered by my
    > room rate or whatever.
    >
    > I hve now switched phones and cannot get the A680 to work as a tethered
    > modem under OS X. So I probably won't have any trouble, though my older
    > N400 is still active, so I could use it in a pinch, and while travelling
    > to florida next week I might do that. I have since switched plans as
    > well, so it would be interesting to see if I get chraged for tetherred
    > access again.

    Very informative post. I note you refer to your charges in minutes rather
    than in kilobytes.
    May I ask what they charged you and was it per minute of use or was it per
    kilobyte?
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Sun, 6 Mar 2005 21:38:38 -0800, "Mij Adyaw"
    <mijadyaw@nospamforme.com> wrote:

    >How well does the Sprint laptop card and service function? I currently have
    >a Verizon laptop card that does not work at my home, I recently ported my
    >cell phone from Verizon to Sprint and am very satisfied. I am thinking about
    >switching to the Sprint laptop card. What are the opinions on the card and
    >the service?

    Before you fork over the money for the laptop card, call Sprint and
    see if you can add a data plan to your Vision phone. A sprint CSR
    stated to me via email that Sprint started selling data plan add-ons
    for users with Visions phones last December.

    Joe Huber
    huber.joseph@comcast.net
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    I used the same connection cord in January while in Hawaii. The Hotel
    wanted $9.95 / day for internet; I used about an hour sometimes two hours /
    day each day for 9 days. Sprint said nothing. No "extra" charges on my
    account(s).


    >> My question is this: Have you ever been cautioned/charged by Sprint for
    >> doing this, or have you ever heard of anyone actually get
    >> booted/charged? I've read around on the internet and it seems that
    >> most people say something along the lines of "Don't abuse it and it
    >> will be okay", but I am looking for something a little firmer than
    >> that.
    >>
    >> Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
    >>
    >> ~Joe
  10. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    In article <gO4Xd.10568$9u6.10515@newssvr31.news.prodigy.com>, jr70
    @blackhole.invalid says...
    > O/Siris didn't mention any hard numbers, but I seem to recall that in
    > the past it was mentioned that the trigger usage is on the order of one
    > Gigabyte to perhaps several Gigabytes per month. Quite a few of us (myself
    > included) routinely use tethered laptops (but not to download large files),
    > without any consequences from Sprint.
    >

    I was a call center drone. I admit that. Call center drones aren't
    given hard numbers. The rumor mill within that call center drummed up
    numbers as low as 20MB and as high as 3GB.

    Personally? I think the number is somewhere below a gig, but below that
    I couldn't begin to say.

    --
    RØß
    O/Siris
    -+-
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    +Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792+
  11. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Stud Muffin wrote:
    > I used the same connection cord in January while in Hawaii. The Hotel
    > wanted $9.95 / day for internet; I used about an hour sometimes two hours /
    > day each day for 9 days. Sprint said nothing. No "extra" charges on my
    > account(s).

    Well, keep in mind that 1xRTT data is packetized and not
    circuit-switched, so how long you're connected has absolutely no bearing
    on usage (even Verizon is trying to get away from billing on "MOU" terms
    because of this, although they did popularize the myth that connection
    time = usage). It's how much actual data that's transferred that makes
    a difference.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    "Frank Thomas" <nospam@yahoo.com> wrote in
    news:1e44a$422caded$943fa940$9727@STARBAND.NET:

    >
    > "Steph" <CUT_skipatrol@hotmail.com_CUT> wrote in message
    > news:Xns961263B674C5Fskipatroluunet@66.75.43.157...
    >
    >> Hmm.. I *know* I posted my experience on this.
    >> My wife and I used our new vision phones for very little for about 6
    >> months with no effects, then we got nailed for virtually every
    >> minute. SPCS took off the charges the first month without much
    >> hassle, but we had already used close to an hour's worth in the next
    >> month.
    >>
    >> I had more trouble dealing with those charges and have since not used
    >> the tethered mode. Luckily I have either had Wi-Fi or wired ethernet
    >> available to me when travelling -- and it not free it was covered by
    >> my room rate or whatever.
    >>
    >> I hve now switched phones and cannot get the A680 to work as a
    >> tethered modem under OS X. So I probably won't have any trouble,
    >> though my older N400 is still active, so I could use it in a pinch,
    >> and while travelling to florida next week I might do that. I have
    >> since switched plans as well, so it would be interesting to see if I
    >> get chraged for tetherred access again.
    >
    > Very informative post. I note you refer to your charges in minutes
    > rather than in kilobytes.
    > May I ask what they charged you and was it per minute of use or was it
    > per kilobyte?
    >
    >
    >


    I don't recall the bill mentioning either minutes or kilobytes. I think
    there is a web page indicating the charge is something like $0.02 /Kb -
    but don't quote me.

    The bill showed "additional charges" as I recall with no breakdown,
    which was primarily why i phoned SPCS support. I was then told it was
    for Vision/data usage. We went through the gyrations of discussing the
    unlimited Vision accounts and I stupidly mentioned the tethered usage.

    Like I said, I have a new plan and am just waiting for the billing to
    stabilize before trying again.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 11:52:14 -0800, joehatesspa wrote:

    > My wife and I recently purchased our first laptop. We also got the
    > cable from Radio Shack to connect my Vision-enabled phone to the laptop
    > so that while we are at our cabin and elsewhere on the road we can get
    > internet access.
    >
    > I did consider getting a "legit" plan from Sprint, but the cost was way
    > to high.
    >
    > My question is this: Have you ever been cautioned/charged by Sprint for
    > doing this, or have you ever heard of anyone actually get
    > booted/charged? I've read around on the internet and it seems that
    > most people say something along the lines of "Don't abuse it and it
    > will be okay", but I am looking for something a little firmer than
    > that.
    >
    > Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > ~Joe

    Oh, yeah! After about 4 months I received a letter saying if I did not
    stop my account would be terminated, but I was moving a LOT of data (uh,
    downloading MP3s all day long...)

    If you're using it to browse web pages here and there where you don't have
    any other connection I don't think it will be a problem, but don't be
    doing it for hours at a time. Even in my case, it was about 4 months
    before I received the letter from the tech dept.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    In article <r3dp21hac0g24c32iamb3c8s7h5oj4tiiv@4ax.com>,
    pminer@elrancho.invalid says...
    > This example really puzzles me. Was it a "High-Speed RAS" connection
    > or something else? I suppose it couldn't have been HSR because that
    > isn't CSD, it's standard packet mode. So how do you put a Vision phone
    > into CSD mode? I've been told in the past that CSD calls are only
    > possible on the older 2G phones, but apparently that's not correct?
    > I'd hate to be in CSD mode and not realize it.
    >

    It's not easy. Remember, I haven't worked there since last July, but if
    I recall correctly, it takes getting the drivers that allow your phone
    to get detected, and THEN tweaking the AT commands so that the phone
    actually dials a POP (in the example I gave, I'm talking like one of the
    AOL access numbers you would choose for AOL's dial-up service).

    Let's use an example: Let's say you belong to PeoplePC's dial-up
    service. And you're in Atlanta, and you want to dial in. I can't
    recall Area Codes, so let's just pretend that one Atlanta access number
    is 459-126-7862 (boy, I'm in trouble if that's a real number). So you
    "convince" your computer that your Sprint Cell phone is actually a
    modem, tell it NOT to look for a dial tone, and have the PC dial that
    number through your cell phone. The moment that access site starts
    handshaking with your "modem", the sprint phone (and the network)
    realize you're doing circuit-switched data.

    Ch-ching. $0.39/min from the moment handshaking occured (because,
    really, the call is complete as soon as those noises start up). If you
    disconnect an hour later, your absolute best speed would have been
    14.4kbps, and you've just spent $23.40.

    So, in short, if you dial an actual phone number, you get the per-minute
    charge and the slow speed. If you use #777 or software programs that
    are out there to do it for you, then it's Vision usage and whatever
    charge applies under that.

    --
    RØß
    O/Siris
    -+-
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    +Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792+
  15. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    O/Siris wrote:
    > In article <r3dp21hac0g24c32iamb3c8s7h5oj4tiiv@4ax.com>,
    > pminer@elrancho.invalid says...
    >> This example really puzzles me. Was it a "High-Speed RAS" connection
    >> or something else? I suppose it couldn't have been HSR because that
    >> isn't CSD, it's standard packet mode. So how do you put a Vision
    >> phone into CSD mode? I've been told in the past that CSD calls are
    >> only possible on the older 2G phones, but apparently that's not
    >> correct? I'd hate to be in CSD mode and not realize it.
    >>
    >
    > It's not easy. Remember, I haven't worked there since last July, but
    > if I recall correctly, it takes getting the drivers that allow your
    > phone to get detected, and THEN tweaking the AT commands so that the
    > phone actually dials a POP (in the example I gave, I'm talking like
    > one of the AOL access numbers you would choose for AOL's dial-up
    > service).
    >

    I doubt an AOL user is gonna be playin' around with AT codes.


    > Let's use an example: Let's say you belong to PeoplePC's dial-up
    > service. And you're in Atlanta, and you want to dial in.

    Unless you're on some kind of regional plan it doesn't really matter
    where you are, no? Since LD has always been included with my SPCS plans,
    I never felt the need to ever change my dial-out number (back when I
    used CSD). I only dialed into my ISP for the few things I couldn't
    easily do via #WEB (like using my ISP's Usenet server).


    > I can't
    > recall Area Codes, so let's just pretend that one Atlanta access
    > number is 459-555-7862 (boy, I'm in trouble if that's a real number).
    > So you "convince" your computer that your Sprint Cell phone is
    > actually a modem, tell it NOT to look for a dial tone, and have the
    > PC dial that number through your cell phone. The moment that access
    > site starts handshaking with your "modem", the sprint phone (and the
    > network) realize you're doing circuit-switched data.
    >

    That doesn't sound any different than setting up a typical 2G SPCS
    connection.

    I think what Paul Miner was asking if you can use a Vision phone with
    CSD, and then how. It looks like it is nothing more than using an old 2G
    phone. However, I heard one person state it does not work like that, and
    you had to use the SPCS Connection Manager (which I don't use) in order
    to do it. For clarity, are you saying it's as simple as plugging in the
    phone number and disabling the tone check?


    --
    Mike
  16. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 09:12:38 -0700, "Tinman"
    <mlynch@REMOVEMEcitlink.net> wrote:

    >O/Siris wrote:
    >> In article <r3dp21hac0g24c32iamb3c8s7h5oj4tiiv@4ax.com>,
    >> pminer@elrancho.invalid says...
    >>> This example really puzzles me. Was it a "High-Speed RAS" connection
    >>> or something else? I suppose it couldn't have been HSR because that
    >>> isn't CSD, it's standard packet mode. So how do you put a Vision
    >>> phone into CSD mode? I've been told in the past that CSD calls are
    >>> only possible on the older 2G phones, but apparently that's not
    >>> correct? I'd hate to be in CSD mode and not realize it.
    >>>
    >>
    >> It's not easy. Remember, I haven't worked there since last July, but
    >> if I recall correctly, it takes getting the drivers that allow your
    >> phone to get detected, and THEN tweaking the AT commands so that the
    >> phone actually dials a POP (in the example I gave, I'm talking like
    >> one of the AOL access numbers you would choose for AOL's dial-up
    >> service).
    >>
    >
    >I doubt an AOL user is gonna be playin' around with AT codes.
    >
    >
    >> Let's use an example: Let's say you belong to PeoplePC's dial-up
    >> service. And you're in Atlanta, and you want to dial in.
    >
    >Unless you're on some kind of regional plan it doesn't really matter
    >where you are, no? Since LD has always been included with my SPCS plans,
    >I never felt the need to ever change my dial-out number (back when I
    >used CSD). I only dialed into my ISP for the few things I couldn't
    >easily do via #WEB (like using my ISP's Usenet server).
    >
    >
    >> I can't
    >> recall Area Codes, so let's just pretend that one Atlanta access
    >> number is 459-555-7862 (boy, I'm in trouble if that's a real number).
    >> So you "convince" your computer that your Sprint Cell phone is
    >> actually a modem, tell it NOT to look for a dial tone, and have the
    >> PC dial that number through your cell phone. The moment that access
    >> site starts handshaking with your "modem", the sprint phone (and the
    >> network) realize you're doing circuit-switched data.
    >>
    >
    >That doesn't sound any different than setting up a typical 2G SPCS
    >connection.
    >
    >I think what Paul Miner was asking if you can use a Vision phone with
    >CSD, and then how. It looks like it is nothing more than using an old 2G
    >phone. However, I heard one person state it does not work like that, and
    >you had to use the SPCS Connection Manager (which I don't use) in order
    >to do it. For clarity, are you saying it's as simple as plugging in the
    >phone number and disabling the tone check?

    Yes, I was asking how to do CSD with a 3G phone so that I don't
    accidentally do it. :-) I know you can dial any number and have it be
    packet switched if you use the Connection Manager, but the rest I'm
    not too sure of.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 03:04:49 -0600, O/Siris <rØbjvargas@comcâst.nêt>
    wrote:

    >Well... the PCS Connection manager is incapable of dialing regular
    >numbers(not that it couldn't, just that it's only coded for the #777
    >Vision access code, essentially).
    >
    >There is no blank, or place to put a number into the Connection Manager.
    >PCS Connection Manager is a software product ostensibly to allow the
    >data cards to access Vision, but it also works for Vision-enabled cell
    >phones. You need something beside Microsoft's DUN service

    The default connection is as you said, it defaults to just putting you
    on the Vision network. You have to configure a New Connection (in
    Connection Manager) in order to get the dialog where you can enter any
    phone number.

    At a high level, when you enter a phone number there, the CM software
    does a quick Area Code lookup to determine the POP nearest to your
    destination. It then connects you via the Vision network to that POP,
    where your 'call' is offloaded to a modem bank and hits the PSTN. So
    looking at it end to end, the first part is packet switched and the
    last part is circuit switched. What I don't know is how such a call
    gets billed, but I'd love to find out. Are these things billed at
    $0.39/minute?
  18. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Paul Miner wrote:

    > At a high level, when you enter a phone number there, the CM software
    > does a quick Area Code lookup to determine the POP nearest to your
    > destination. It then connects you via the Vision network to that POP,
    > where your 'call' is offloaded to a modem bank and hits the PSTN. So
    > looking at it end to end, the first part is packet switched and the
    > last part is circuit switched.

    I wouldn't even go that far. It's quite possible (even likely) that the
    entire call is circuit switched, using a traditional 13kbps just as a
    previous generation device would have.

    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 15:53:43 -0500, Isaiah Beard
    <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:

    >Paul Miner wrote:
    >
    >> At a high level, when you enter a phone number there, the CM software
    >> does a quick Area Code lookup to determine the POP nearest to your
    >> destination. It then connects you via the Vision network to that POP,
    >> where your 'call' is offloaded to a modem bank and hits the PSTN. So
    >> looking at it end to end, the first part is packet switched and the
    >> last part is circuit switched.
    >
    >I wouldn't even go that far. It's quite possible (even likely) that the
    >entire call is circuit switched, using a traditional 13kbps just as a
    >previous generation device would have.

    Well, I'm looking at the original design doc and AFAIK there have been
    no design changes since the functionality was introduced. BTW, the
    modems are 56k.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Paul Miner wrote:


    >>I wouldn't even go that far. It's quite possible (even likely) that the
    >>entire call is circuit switched, using a traditional 13kbps just as a
    >>previous generation device would have.
    >
    >
    > Well, I'm looking at the original design doc and AFAIK there have been
    > no design changes since the functionality was introduced. BTW, the
    > modems are 56k.

    Yes, the modems are 56k, but a circuit-switched CDMA data channel is
    only 13k max. With compression, 14.4k is the best you can hope for.
    The RTT packet data network does NOT access the modem banks.


    --
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    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Sat, 19 Mar 2005 14:08:30 -0500, Isaiah Beard
    <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:

    >Paul Miner wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>I wouldn't even go that far. It's quite possible (even likely) that the
    >>>entire call is circuit switched, using a traditional 13kbps just as a
    >>>previous generation device would have.
    >>
    >>
    >> Well, I'm looking at the original design doc and AFAIK there have been
    >> no design changes since the functionality was introduced. BTW, the
    >> modems are 56k.
    >
    >Yes, the modems are 56k, but a circuit-switched CDMA data channel is
    >only 13k max. With compression, 14.4k is the best you can hope for.

    True, but I wasn't arguing circuit-switched. The connection I'm
    talking about is packet switched over the Vision network, or at least
    part of it is. The whole reason for Sprint putting this functionality
    in place was so that customers could avoid the low speed of a CSD
    connection. Apparently, they haven't advertised it AT ALL since no one
    seems to know about it or admits to having used it. Even Rob 0Siris
    (sp?) didn't seem to know about it.

    >The RTT packet data network does NOT access the modem banks.

    Actually, it does, but since no one seems to know about it, it doesn't
    matter.
  22. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    In article <lrdm315o3a2uup41ug0bpj4g0vfehjm985@4ax.com>,
    pminer@elrancho.invalid says...
    >
    > The default connection is as you said, it defaults to just putting you
    > on the Vision network. You have to configure a New Connection (in
    > Connection Manager) in order to get the dialog where you can enter any
    > phone number.
    >
    > At a high level, when you enter a phone number there, the CM software
    > does a quick Area Code lookup to determine the POP nearest to your
    > destination. It then connects you via the Vision network to that POP,
    > where your 'call' is offloaded to a modem bank and hits the PSTN. So
    > looking at it end to end, the first part is packet switched and the
    > last part is circuit switched. What I don't know is how such a call
    > gets billed, but I'd love to find out. Are these things billed at
    > $0.39/minute?
    >
    >

    That level of Connection Manager functionality was considered "Tier 2"
    technical support. As a Tier 1 rep, I dealt only with the basic
    functionality of the phones and data cards. I came across no examples
    of this use of Connection Manager while I worked there. And, while
    there may have been some kind of design planning done along the lines
    you mention, there was never any such actual functionality that I ever
    encountered.

    --
    RØß
    O/Siris
    -+-
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    +Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792+
  23. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Paul Miner wrote:

    >>The RTT packet data network does NOT access the modem banks.
    >
    >
    > Actually, it does,

    If it does, then it has a peculiar way of throttling down its speed
    then. I tried it once on a Nokia 6225. Guess what? 12.5kbps was my
    max tested speed. Fancy that.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  24. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Isaiah Beard wrote:
    > Paul Miner wrote:
    >
    >>> The RTT packet data network does NOT access the modem banks.
    >>
    >>
    >> Actually, it does,
    >
    > If it does, then it has a peculiar way of throttling down its speed
    > then. I tried it once on a Nokia 6225. Guess what? 12.5kbps was my
    > max tested speed. Fancy that.

    I used the 2G network extensively and it *never* came close to 12.5
    kbps--using reliable tests. Real-world speed was closer to 4-6 kbps, at
    least in every area I used it.


    --
    Mike | Have you ever imagined a world with no
    | hypothetical situations?
  25. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    O/Siris wrote:
    > In article <qg3h311rbrpun8e72u0dfqk40cqmvaalot@4ax.com>,
    > pminer@elrancho.invalid says...
    >>>
    >>> I think what Paul Miner was asking if you can use a Vision phone
    >>> with CSD, and then how. It looks like it is nothing more than using
    >>> an old 2G phone. However, I heard one person state it does not work
    >>> like that, and you had to use the SPCS Connection Manager (which I
    >>> don't use) in order to do it. For clarity, are you saying it's as
    >>> simple as plugging in the phone number and disabling the tone check?
    >
    > Well... the PCS Connection manager is incapable of dialing regular
    > numbers(not that it couldn't, just that it's only coded for the #777
    > Vision access code, essentially).
    >

    Not true.


    > But, if you can get your PC to realize that a dialing device is
    > connected when your PCS Vision phone is connected, then yeah, it's
    > basically that easy.
    >

    I'm not sure this is correct either. Others have noted that you need to
    use the connection manager to accomplish this--not just DUN. I of course
    could easily test this myself, and then simply disconnect after a minute
    or two. I don't care about .39 for a minute or so, but I'd rather not
    call attention to my account.


    > And don't nit-pick so much. The examples I gave were just for ease of
    > explanation.
    >

    "Nit-pick?" LOL.


    > There is no blank, or place to put a number into the Connection
    > Manager.

    Yes there is.


    > You need something beside Microsoft's DUN service

    And that "something" is? (I don't see what another dialer can do that
    DUN and connection manager can't, as it pertains to this discussion.)


    --
    Mike | Most people don't realize that large pieces of
    | coral, attached to the skull by common wood
    | screws, can make a child look like a deer.
  26. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Tinman wrote:

    >>If it does, then it has a peculiar way of throttling down its speed
    >>then. I tried it once on a Nokia 6225. Guess what? 12.5kbps was my
    >>max tested speed. Fancy that.
    >
    >
    > I used the 2G network extensively and it *never* came close to 12.5
    > kbps--using reliable tests.

    the mobile test on dslreports.com works fairly well. It sends you
    straight text though, so it's very easy to do a pure upper-limit test
    with it.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  27. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Isaiah Beard wrote:
    > Tinman wrote:
    >
    >>> If it does, then it has a peculiar way of throttling down its speed
    >>> then. I tried it once on a Nokia 6225. Guess what? 12.5kbps was
    >>> my max tested speed. Fancy that.
    >>
    >>
    >> I used the 2G network extensively and it *never* came close to 12.5
    >> kbps--using reliable tests.
    >
    > the mobile test on dslreports.com works fairly well. It sends you
    > straight text though, so it's very easy to do a pure upper-limit test
    > with it.

    Oh I believed your test results. I was just saying that that's not all
    that bad for CDMA CSD--at least compared to the 2G phones I have used
    (haven't tried CSD with a Vision phone). While the old client-server
    compression proxy (BlueKite, IIRC) made Web browsing somewhat bearable,
    it of course did nothing to help straight binary DLs. I would have
    killed for a true 12.5 kbps back then.


    --
    Mike
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