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PCS Phone as USB Modem for Laptop

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March 14, 2005 5:17:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

A co-worker recently got a new Motorola V-180 phone on his AT&T plan.
This phone has a USB port where he can use it as a dialup modem to
connect his laptop to the internet, WITHOUT paying any fees above his
$35 voice plan.

I checked the Motorola site, and found that this phone is not yet
released for Sprint PCS.

My question - does anyone know of a phone that does work on Sprint, and
also has this modem feature? And if so, what sort of connection
bandwidth are you getting? I'm assuming it's probably slower than
standard 56K dialup, but how much?

thanks,

Martin
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 15, 2005 3:04:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On 14 Mar 2005 14:17:05 -0800, "Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote:

>A co-worker recently got a new Motorola V-180 phone on his AT&T plan.
>This phone has a USB port where he can use it as a dialup modem to
>connect his laptop to the internet, WITHOUT paying any fees above his
>$35 voice plan.
>
>I checked the Motorola site, and found that this phone is not yet
>released for Sprint PCS.
>
>My question - does anyone know of a phone that does work on Sprint, and
>also has this modem feature?

Treo 650, once hacked with the patch to DUN.

>And if so, what sort of connection
>bandwidth are you getting? I'm assuming it's probably slower than
>standard 56K dialup, but how much?

Actually, 60-80 kbps has been reported.

However, SPCS wants you to use a data card for data and agressively
discourages the practice of using a phone as a modem for 1xRTT service.


--
The TSA is a test. It is only a test......
"Find out just what people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue until they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress." -- Frederick Douglass, August 4, 1857.
John Bartley, K7AAY, PDX OR USA, Opinions mine.
March 15, 2005 3:36:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

no.one@no.gov wrote:
> On 14 Mar 2005 14:17:05 -0800, "Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com>
wrote:
>
> >A co-worker recently got a new Motorola V-180 phone on his AT&T
plan.
> >This phone has a USB port where he can use it as a dialup modem to
> >connect his laptop to the internet, WITHOUT paying any fees above
his
> >$35 voice plan.
> >
> >I checked the Motorola site, and found that this phone is not yet
> >released for Sprint PCS.
> >
> >My question - does anyone know of a phone that does work on Sprint,
and
> >also has this modem feature?
>
> Treo 650, once hacked with the patch to DUN.
>
> John Bartley, K7AAY, PDX OR USA, Opinions mine.

John,

Could you elaborate on the statement "Treo 650, once hacked with the
patch to DUN". Is this a piece of gear easily available to me, and how
do I use it? I have Sprint, with plenty of extra night and weekend
minutes, and would like to take advantage of the modem feature.
Particularly since I no longer have a wired phone for dialup.

thanks,

Martin
Related resources
March 15, 2005 5:36:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

OK, by trying a variety of keyword-seach combinations on Yahoo, I think
I've found the answer .... any 2G Sprint phone will do the trick! I
actually had the Samsung sch-8500 before I upgraded three years ago,
just never knew about this feature! Link:
http://navasgrp.home.att.net/tech/sch-8500/

Martin

Martin wrote:
> A co-worker recently got a new Motorola V-180 phone on his AT&T plan.
> This phone has a USB port where he can use it as a dialup modem to
> connect his laptop to the internet, WITHOUT paying any fees above his
> $35 voice plan.
>
> I checked the Motorola site, and found that this phone is not yet
> released for Sprint PCS.
>
> My question - does anyone know of a phone that does work on Sprint,
and
> also has this modem feature? And if so, what sort of connection
> bandwidth are you getting? I'm assuming it's probably slower than
> standard 56K dialup, but how much?
>
> thanks,
>
> Martin
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 16, 2005 3:30:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

In article <1110838625.655017.71600@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
"Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote:

> My question - does anyone know of a phone that does work on Sprint, and
> also has this modem feature? And if so, what sort of connection
> bandwidth are you getting? I'm assuming it's probably slower than
> standard 56K dialup, but how much?

My Sanyo 4900, 5300, and now my Sony t608 all do DUN with no problem.
I'd think any of the Sprint phones would. Just get a cable to hook it to
the notebook and set up the DUN using info from Sprintusers.com.

You don't want to use a 2G phone because then you get charged per
minute. 3G (vision) charges per megabyte, but I think most accounts have
unlimited vision now. Just don't abuse it and Sprint doesn't care.

/tommy
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 16, 2005 4:23:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Tue, 15 Mar 2005 12:36:15 -0800, Martin wrote:
>
> John,
>
> Could you elaborate on the statement "Treo 650, once hacked with the
> patch to DUN". Is this a piece of gear easily available to me, and how
> do I use it? I have Sprint, with plenty of extra night and weekend
> minutes, and would like to take advantage of the modem feature.
> Particularly since I no longer have a wired phone for dialup.
>
> thanks,
>
> Martin

He is referring to the patching of the treo 650 to include features it
originally had that sprintpcs had removed for their model. Such as DUN and
DUN over bluetooth. It is purely software patch and if I remember is
already in the phone sprintpcs just removed the config/access to the
functions.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 16, 2005 4:30:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Tue, 15 Mar 2005 00:04:55 +0000, no.one wrote:
>
> Actually, 60-80 kbps has been reported.
>
> However, SPCS wants you to use a data card for data and agressively
> discourages the practice of using a phone as a modem for 1xRTT service.

Normally I get around 60-80kbit/s bursting (7.5-10KByte/s) for various
services like ftp. Normally a fast start then the connection would slow
down around 3-4KB/s if not lower. Today tho I had to use an ssl/http based
download application I have worked on and I was able to sustain 12-14KB/s
over 5min period straight. Which leads me to believe sprintpcs has some
kind of priority on traffic that goes through their transparent http proxy.
Since the traffic was encrypted they couldn't modify it like they do with
http images. Overall it is a good connection,except for the lag but I
can live with it, for a great price and good service.
March 16, 2005 11:56:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

Central wrote:
> On Tue, 15 Mar 2005 00:04:55 +0000, no.one wrote:
>>
>> Actually, 60-80 kbps has been reported.
>>
>> However, SPCS wants you to use a data card for data and agressively
>> discourages the practice of using a phone as a modem for 1xRTT
>> service.
>
> Normally I get around 60-80kbit/s bursting (7.5-10KByte/s) for various
> services like ftp. Normally a fast start then the connection would
> slow down around 3-4KB/s if not lower.

Now you did it. Queue the "I never see anything below 2.5 GB per second"
crowd.


--
Mike | Last words of Thomas Grasso, executed in 1995:
| "I did not get my Spaghetti-O's, I got spaghetti.
| I want the press to know this."
March 16, 2005 2:47:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

tommy wrote:
> In article <1110838625.655017.71600@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
> "Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > My question - does anyone know of a phone that does work on Sprint,
and
> > also has this modem feature? And if so, what sort of connection
> > bandwidth are you getting? I'm assuming it's probably slower than
> > standard 56K dialup, but how much?
>
> My Sanyo 4900, 5300, and now my Sony t608 all do DUN with no problem.

> I'd think any of the Sprint phones would. Just get a cable to hook it
to
> the notebook and set up the DUN using info from Sprintusers.com.
>
> You don't want to use a 2G phone because then you get charged per
> minute. 3G (vision) charges per megabyte, but I think most accounts
have
> unlimited vision now. Just don't abuse it and Sprint doesn't care.
>
> /tommy

/tommy,

Why wouldn't I want to be charged by the minute, since I have unlimited
minutes at night and on weekends? I'm at work during the day, and just
looking for a no-additional-cost way to get to my dial-up ISP during
off-hours from home. I've had my landline taken out because I use the
cell phone for all calls anyway. My understanding is that I can use a
2G phone as an analog modem, and as far as Sprint knows I am just
talking on the phone all night.

Let me know if my interpretation isn't correct.

Martin
March 16, 2005 3:45:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

Martin wrote:
> tommy wrote:
> > In article <1110838625.655017.71600@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
> > "Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >
> > > My question - does anyone know of a phone that does work on
Sprint,
> and
> > > also has this modem feature? And if so, what sort of connection
> > > bandwidth are you getting? I'm assuming it's probably slower
than
> > > standard 56K dialup, but how much?
> >
> > My Sanyo 4900, 5300, and now my Sony t608 all do DUN with no
problem.
>
> > I'd think any of the Sprint phones would. Just get a cable to hook
it
> to
> > the notebook and set up the DUN using info from Sprintusers.com.
> >
> > You don't want to use a 2G phone because then you get charged per
> > minute. 3G (vision) charges per megabyte, but I think most accounts
> have
> > unlimited vision now. Just don't abuse it and Sprint doesn't care.
> >
> > /tommy
>
> /tommy,
>
> Why wouldn't I want to be charged by the minute, since I have
unlimited
> minutes at night and on weekends? I'm at work during the day, and
just
> looking for a no-additional-cost way to get to my dial-up ISP during
> off-hours from home. I've had my landline taken out because I use
the
> cell phone for all calls anyway. My understanding is that I can use
a
> 2G phone as an analog modem, and as far as Sprint knows I am just
> talking on the phone all night.
>
> Let me know if my interpretation isn't correct.
>
> Martin

OK, I did some more reading on this subject at sprintusers.com.
Apparently there are some combinations of conditions that do result in
additional charges. A participant on that forum, "monkeyboy", noted
that you can use an old 2G phone, dial #2932, and connect with no
charge other than minutes used. On the other hand, if you use a newer
3G phone, they charge you airtime plus an additional $0.39/minute.
Does that sound right?

Martin
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 17, 2005 5:51:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1110838625.655017.71600@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> A co-worker recently got a new Motorola V-180 phone on his AT&T plan.
> This phone has a USB port where he can use it as a dialup modem to
> connect his laptop to the internet, WITHOUT paying any fees above his
> $35 voice plan.
>

As someone who also has an ATT phone in addition to sprintpcs, I think a
quick summary of how you can connect a laptop to the internet is in order.
There are the following ways:

1) Use your phone to make an analog call to your dialup ISP. This works on
some ATT phones, like older Nokia phones, if you have the right software
drivers on your laptop. I am unaware of any Sprintphones that will go into
analog mode when dialing an ISP. When connecting, it uses the minutes in
your voice plan, and you are not charged anything above what your voice plan
costs. Connection speeds are typically 9600 to 14400. They also tend to be
unstable, with frequent disconnects. If someone had some software to force a
dual mode Sprint phone to go into analog mode when making a a call, this
would work, but I am not aware of any available

2) Use your phone to make a digital call to your dialup ISP. ATT phones
won't do this, it requires the phone company to make what is called a CSD
call, which, ATT does not provide, but which Sprint does. Connection
speeds are similar to faster dialup. The drawback: sprint knows when the
phone is making a CSD call and charges you 39 cents a minute to use CSD
service

3) After that, you are into GPRS on ATT and Cingular or 1XRTT service on
Sprint. Niether are dialup services where you dialup your own ISP, ATT or
Sprint is the ISP you connect to. In sprint's case, when you open open up
your dialup dialog, you put in #777 as the number to call instead of a
telephone number and you don't enter a password. Both GPRS and 1XRTT are
fast, but Sprint providing the fastest service, I typically see about a
measured 90 kbs . ATT is pretty aggressive about "casual data" use and
their data plans are very overpriced. Connect to the internet with GPRS
without a plan they tell you you will pay up 5 cents a kilobyte. I have
never tested those waters. Sprint has a hit or miss enforcement practice,
with numbers of people reporting they use their phones to connect to the
interent and are not charged. However, I think I am seeing an upsurge in
the number of people who say they are getting charged, receiving warning
letters, or posters who say they work for sprint and have charged
people/sent warning notices.

Sprint now has some data plans for people that want to use their phones to
connect laptops too, and they also sell data cards and plans.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 17, 2005 5:52:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1110838625.655017.71600@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> A co-worker recently got a new Motorola V-180 phone on his AT&T plan.
> This phone has a USB port where he can use it as a dialup modem to
> connect his laptop to the internet, WITHOUT paying any fees above his
> $35 voice plan.
>

As someone who also has an ATT phone in addition to sprintpcs, I think a
quick summary of how you can connect a laptop to the internet is in order.
There are the following ways:

1) Use your phone to make an analog call to your dialup ISP. This works on
some ATT phones, like older Nokia phones, if you have the right software
drivers on your laptop. I am unaware of any Sprintphones that will go into
analog mode when dialing an ISP. When connecting, it uses the minutes in
your voice plan, and you are not charged anything above what your voice plan
costs. Connection speeds are typically 9600 to 14400. They also tend to be
unstable, with frequent disconnects. If someone had some software to force a
dual mode Sprint phone to go into analog mode when making a a call, this
would work, but I am not aware of any available

2) Use your phone to make a digital call to your dialup ISP. ATT phones
won't do this, it requires the phone company to make what is called a CSD
call, which, ATT does not provide, but which Sprint does. Connection
speeds are similar to faster dialup. The drawback: sprint knows when the
phone is making a CSD call and charges you 39 cents a minute to use CSD
service

3) After that, you are into GPRS on ATT and Cingular or 1XRTT service on
Sprint. Niether are dialup services where you dialup your own ISP, ATT or
Sprint is the ISP you connect to. In sprint's case, when you open open up
your dialup dialog, you put in #777 as the number to call instead of a
telephone number and you don't enter a password. Both GPRS and 1XRTT are
fast, but Sprint providing the fastest service, I typically see about a
measured 90 kbs . ATT is pretty aggressive about "casual data" use and
their data plans are very overpriced. Connect to the internet with GPRS
without a plan they tell you you will pay up 5 cents a kilobyte. I have
never tested those waters. Sprint has a hit or miss enforcement practice,
with numbers of people reporting they use their phones to connect to the
interent and are not charged. However, I think I am seeing an upsurge in
the number of people who say they are getting charged, receiving warning
letters, or posters who say they work for sprint and have charged
people/sent warning notices.

Sprint now has some data plans for people that want to use their phones to
connect laptops too, and they also sell data cards and plans.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 17, 2005 5:55:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1110838625.655017.71600@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> A co-worker recently got a new Motorola V-180 phone on his AT&T plan.
> This phone has a USB port where he can use it as a dialup modem to
> connect his laptop to the internet, WITHOUT paying any fees above his
> $35 voice plan.
>

As someone who also has an ATT phone in addition to sprintpcs, I think a
quick summary of how you can connect a laptop to the internet is in order.
There are the following ways:

1) Use your phone to make an analog call to your dialup ISP. This works on
some ATT phones, like older Nokia phones, if you have the right software
drivers on your laptop. I am unaware of any Sprintphones that will go into
analog mode when dialing an ISP. When connecting, it uses the minutes in
your voice plan, and you are not charged anything above what your voice plan
costs. Connection speeds are typically 9600 to 14400. They also tend to be
unstable, with frequent disconnects. If someone had some software to force a
dual mode Sprint phone to go into analog mode when making a a call, this
would work, but I am not aware of any available

2) Use your phone to make a digital call to your dialup ISP. ATT phones
won't do this, it requires the phone company to make what is called a CSD
call, which, ATT does not provide, but which Sprint does. Connection
speeds are similar to faster dialup. The drawback: sprint knows when the
phone is making a CSD call and charges you 39 cents a minute to use CSD
service

3) After that, you are into GPRS on ATT and Cingular or 1XRTT service on
Sprint. Niether are dialup services where you dialup your own ISP, ATT or
Sprint is the ISP you connect to. In sprint's case, when you open open up
your dialup dialog, you put in #777 as the number to call instead of a
telephone number and you don't enter a password. Both GPRS and 1XRTT are
fast, but Sprint providing the fastest service, I typically see about a
measured 90 kbs . ATT is pretty aggressive about "casual data" use and
their data plans are very overpriced. Connect to the internet with GPRS
without a plan they tell you you will pay up 5 cents a kilobyte. I have
never tested those waters. Sprint has a hit or miss enforcement practice,
with numbers of people reporting they use their phones to connect to the
interent and are not charged. However, I think I am seeing an upsurge in
the number of people who say they are getting charged, receiving warning
letters, or posters who say they work for sprint and have charged
people/sent warning notices.

Sprint now has some data plans for people that want to use their phones to
connect laptops too, and they also sell data cards and plans.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 17, 2005 9:48:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

Samsung i500

Comes will all required cables and drivers.



"Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1110838625.655017.71600@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>A co-worker recently got a new Motorola V-180 phone on his AT&T plan.
> This phone has a USB port where he can use it as a dialup modem to
> connect his laptop to the internet, WITHOUT paying any fees above his
> $35 voice plan.
>
> I checked the Motorola site, and found that this phone is not yet
> released for Sprint PCS.
>
> My question - does anyone know of a phone that does work on Sprint, and
> also has this modem feature? And if so, what sort of connection
> bandwidth are you getting? I'm assuming it's probably slower than
> standard 56K dialup, but how much?
>
> thanks,
>
> Martin
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 26, 2005 6:21:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

In article <1111005912.013486.23850@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>, "Martin" <funkychateauSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote:

>OK, I did some more reading on this subject at sprintusers.com.
>Apparently there are some combinations of conditions that do result in
>additional charges. A participant on that forum, "monkeyboy", noted
>that you can use an old 2G phone, dial #2932, and connect with no
>charge other than minutes used. On the other hand, if you use a newer
>3G phone, they charge you airtime plus an additional $0.39/minute.
>Does that sound right?

Almost. First EVERY modem call is detected and billed as a DATA
call. It is not possible (well not easily anyways) for a CDMA phone to
carry a true analog modem signal as if it were a voice call.

Yes, dialing either a real analog modem (e.g. dialup ISP) or dialing
#2932 can be billed as just airtime minutes, PROVIDED you have
the $5/mo Wireless Web option on your account. #2932 connects
you to the Internet using Sprint as your ISP. If you don't have WW
on your account, its $0.39/min.

On a phone provisioned for Vision (the higher speed Sprint Internet
connection), if you use #2932 (or dial a real ISP), it costs $0.39/min
REGARDLESS of whether you have WW on your account or not.

Most people have migrated to Vision since it is 5-8 times faster,
but it costs $15/mo and doesn't let you dial other ISPs or
FAX machines.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 26, 2005 6:21:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 03:21:31 GMT, dantso@yahoo.com (Daniel Tso) wrote:

>Most people have migrated to Vision since it is 5-8 times faster,
>but it costs $15/mo and doesn't let you dial other ISPs or
>FAX machines.

You can dial any 10-digit number using Sprint's Connection Manager.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 26, 2005 6:40:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

Also because they do not sell WW phones anymore. I don't think a
Vision phone is allowed to have a WW option, whether or not it has a
Vision option on it's plan.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 26, 2005 6:40:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

Jerome Zelinske wrote:
>
> Also because they do not sell WW phones anymore. I don't think a
> Vision phone is allowed to have a WW option, whether or not it has a
> Vision option on it's plan.

Things might have changed, but when I purchased an A500, I was given
the option of retaining my WW plan.

Notan
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 26, 2005 7:40:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

In article <08r9411uee72m4d2u7frliqo4fgr82903s@4ax.com>, Paul Miner <pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 03:21:31 GMT, dantso@yahoo.com (Daniel Tso) wrote:
>
>>Most people have migrated to Vision since it is 5-8 times faster,
>>but it costs $15/mo and doesn't let you dial other ISPs or
>>FAX machines.
>
>You can dial any 10-digit number using Sprint's Connection Manager.

ok.... that has nothing to do with Vision...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 26, 2005 7:40:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 16:40:54 GMT, dantsoNOSPAM@yahoo.com (Daniel Tso)
wrote:

>In article <08r9411uee72m4d2u7frliqo4fgr82903s@4ax.com>, Paul Miner <pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>>On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 03:21:31 GMT, dantso@yahoo.com (Daniel Tso) wrote:
>>
>>>Most people have migrated to Vision since it is 5-8 times faster,
>>>but it costs $15/mo and doesn't let you dial other ISPs or
>>>FAX machines.
>>
>>You can dial any 10-digit number using Sprint's Connection Manager.
>
>ok.... that has nothing to do with Vision...

How so?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 27, 2005 8:17:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

In article <c6cb41lruo3qn2bj12rg4h0d1ocl67c54k@4ax.com>, Paul Miner <pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:

>>>>Most people have migrated to Vision since it is 5-8 times faster,
>>>>but it costs $15/mo and doesn't let you dial other ISPs or
>>>>FAX machines.
>>>
>>>You can dial any 10-digit number using Sprint's Connection Manager.
>>
>>ok.... that has nothing to do with Vision...
>
>How so?

mmm.. it'd be easier for you to explain why you might think that it DOES
have something to do with Vision...

Vision is Sprint's marketing name for its 1xrtt wireless Internet access
service (and perhaps a meager collection of "content services" accessible
using 1xrtt). To connect to Vision, your phone "dials" #777, and then logs
onto Vision and is then issued an IP address on the Internet.

So now why do you think Vision has anything to do with dialing 10-digit
numbers ? If you're dialing other ISPs with your phone, you're not connecting
to Vision.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 27, 2005 8:17:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 04:17:24 GMT, dantsoNOSPAM@yahoo.com (Daniel Tso)
wrote:

>In article <c6cb41lruo3qn2bj12rg4h0d1ocl67c54k@4ax.com>, Paul Miner <pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>
>>>>>Most people have migrated to Vision since it is 5-8 times faster,
>>>>>but it costs $15/mo and doesn't let you dial other ISPs or
>>>>>FAX machines.
>>>>
>>>>You can dial any 10-digit number using Sprint's Connection Manager.
>>>
>>>ok.... that has nothing to do with Vision...
>>
>>How so?
>
>mmm.. it'd be easier for you to explain why you might think that it DOES
>have something to do with Vision...
>
>Vision is Sprint's marketing name for its 1xrtt wireless Internet access
>service (and perhaps a meager collection of "content services" accessible
>using 1xrtt). To connect to Vision, your phone "dials" #777, and then logs
>onto Vision and is then issued an IP address on the Internet.
>
>So now why do you think Vision has anything to do with dialing 10-digit
>numbers ?

Ok, I see what you mean. To me, there's a connection to Vision because
dialing a 10-digit number connects you to your called number via the
1xRTT network, aka the Vision network to most people. It's not the
older 2G Wireless Web and it's not circuit-switched data, it's just
regular packet-switched 1xRTT stuff that most of us know as Vision.
Like you said, though, it has nothing to do with any of the so-called
Vision services, so you have a good point there.

>If you're dialing other ISPs with your phone, you're not connecting
>to Vision.

If Vision is the 1xRTT network, and not so much the meager services,
as you pointed out above, then yes, you're connecting to other ISP's
via the Vision network.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 27, 2005 10:18:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

In article <1efc41176kd443vl7hmbfd8ui2hn5g7h7t@4ax.com>, Paul Miner <pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>>So now why do you think Vision has anything to do with dialing 10-digit
>>numbers ?
>
>Ok, I see what you mean. To me, there's a connection to Vision because
>dialing a 10-digit number connects you to your called number via the
>1xRTT network, aka the Vision network to most people. It's not the
>older 2G Wireless Web and it's not circuit-switched data, it's just
>regular packet-switched 1xRTT stuff that most of us know as Vision.
>
>>If you're dialing other ISPs with your phone, you're not connecting
>>to Vision.
>
>If Vision is the 1xRTT network, and not so much the meager services,
>as you pointed out above, then yes, you're connecting to other ISP's
>via the Vision network.

uh, no. 1xrtt has NO tie-in to dial-out modem that might be able to
connect to arbitrary ISP's accessed over the PSTN, unlike the older
2G WW CSPD. What you are suggesting would require that the 1xrtt
network interface with a bank of analog modems that would in turn
dial-out to the number you've given and somehow throttle down the
144kbs data rate of the 1xrtt connection to the 56kbs modems. There
is no such arrangement in place for 1xrtt. This only happens with the
2G WW connections and leaves you with 14.4kbs data rates.

It sounds like you think that if you direct your phone to dialout like a
modem (Hayes AT command set) to a normal PSTN number to an
arbitrary ISP (or any analog modem or fax machine), that you are
using Vision. You are not. You are in fact using the older 2G WW
modem emulation feature (which will be billed at $0.39/min and is
not included in the Vision plan option). You use Vision (1xrtt) ONLY
by dialing #777, not any other number. When you use Vision, Sprint
is your ISP, not any other ISP.

So, what kind of speeds are you getting by dialing 10-digit ISP
phone numbers that you think are using Vision ?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 27, 2005 10:18:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 18:18:36 GMT, dantsoNOSPAM@yahoo.com (Daniel Tso)
wrote:

>In article <1efc41176kd443vl7hmbfd8ui2hn5g7h7t@4ax.com>, Paul Miner <pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>>>So now why do you think Vision has anything to do with dialing 10-digit
>>>numbers ?
>>
>>Ok, I see what you mean. To me, there's a connection to Vision because
>>dialing a 10-digit number connects you to your called number via the
>>1xRTT network, aka the Vision network to most people. It's not the
>>older 2G Wireless Web and it's not circuit-switched data, it's just
>>regular packet-switched 1xRTT stuff that most of us know as Vision.
>>
>>>If you're dialing other ISPs with your phone, you're not connecting
>>>to Vision.
>>
>>If Vision is the 1xRTT network, and not so much the meager services,
>>as you pointed out above, then yes, you're connecting to other ISP's
>>via the Vision network.
>
>uh, no. 1xrtt has NO tie-in to dial-out modem that might be able to
>connect to arbitrary ISP's accessed over the PSTN, unlike the older
>2G WW CSPD. What you are suggesting would require that the 1xrtt
>network interface with a bank of analog modems that would in turn
>dial-out to the number you've given and somehow throttle down the
>144kbs data rate of the 1xrtt connection to the 56kbs modems. There
>is no such arrangement in place for 1xrtt. This only happens with the
>2G WW connections and leaves you with 14.4kbs data rates.

I'm not surprised to hear that you don't know about such a connection
and its resulting functionality, but I am a bit surprised by how sure
of yourself you seem to be. You're not correct, of course.

>It sounds like you think that if you direct your phone to dialout like a
>modem (Hayes AT command set) to a normal PSTN number to an
>arbitrary ISP (or any analog modem or fax machine), that you are
>using Vision.

Yes, but only if you use the Sprint Connection Manager. The
functionality exists there, not in the phone or data card itself.

>You are not. You are in fact using the older 2G WW
>modem emulation feature (which will be billed at $0.39/min and is
>not included in the Vision plan option). You use Vision (1xrtt) ONLY
>by dialing #777, not any other number. When you use Vision, Sprint
>is your ISP, not any other ISP.

From that, I can't tell where you think Vision (the network) starts
and where Vision (the apps) take over. You're correct, of course, that
you can only access (most) Vision apps by dialing #777. (Some can be
accessed via any Internet connection, but that's outside the scope.)
But you access Vision (the network) regardless of the number dialed,
as long as you're using a 3G device and CM. With that combination, you
couldn't access the older 2G WW network even if you wanted to.

>So, what kind of speeds are you getting by dialing 10-digit ISP
>phone numbers that you think are using Vision ?

If we're still having this discussion by the next time I try it, I'll
try to remember to let you know how it goes.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 27, 2005 10:46:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:09:29 -0600, Paul Miner
<pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>Yes, but only if you use the Sprint Connection Manager. The
>functionality exists there, not in the phone or data card itself.

What exactly is the Sprint Connection Manager doing? Is it somehow
emulating a modem?

Is it still available? Sprint has rigged the modem emulation in my
Sanyo MM7400 to dial only one number, #777.

Joe Huber
huber.joseph@comcast.net
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 28, 2005 3:14:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 18:46:14 -0600, Joseph Huber
<huber.joseph@comcast.net> wrote:

>On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:09:29 -0600, Paul Miner
><pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>>Yes, but only if you use the Sprint Connection Manager. The
>>functionality exists there, not in the phone or data card itself.
>
>What exactly is the Sprint Connection Manager doing? Is it somehow
>emulating a modem?

Yes and no. It does a simple Area Code lookup before opening a
standard Telnet connection (via the Vision network) to a modem bank
located as close as possible to your called party, then sends standard
Hayes commands over the Telnet connection to control the 56k modem
located there. Beyond the Telnet connection, the rest of the call is
via the PSTN.

>Is it still available? Sprint has rigged the modem emulation in my
>Sanyo MM7400 to dial only one number, #777.

It's still available, although I don't have a link handy. The best I
could find just now was this overview:
<http://www1.sprintpcs.com/explore/ueContent.jsp?scTopic...;
March 28, 2005 11:51:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

Paul Miner wrote:
> On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 18:46:14 -0600, Joseph Huber
> <huber.joseph@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:09:29 -0600, Paul Miner
>> <pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>>> Yes, but only if you use the Sprint Connection Manager. The
>>> functionality exists there, not in the phone or data card itself.
>>
>> What exactly is the Sprint Connection Manager doing? Is it somehow
>> emulating a modem?
>
> Yes and no. It does a simple Area Code lookup before opening a
> standard Telnet connection (via the Vision network) to a modem bank
> located as close as possible to your called party, then sends standard
> Hayes commands over the Telnet connection to control the 56k modem
> located there. Beyond the Telnet connection, the rest of the call is
> via the PSTN.
>

Thanks for that overview, Paul. Someone recently (quasi-)indicated it
was as simple as using DUN. I had thought it wasn't possible without
using CM, but wasn't sure. Now I am. (And I didn't have to waste .39
trying to find out. <g>)


--
Mike | Have you ever imagined a world with no
| hypothetical situations?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
March 28, 2005 4:27:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

On Mon, 28 Mar 2005 07:51:58 -0700, "Tinman"
<mlynch@REMOVEMEcitlink.net> wrote:

>Paul Miner wrote:
>> On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 18:46:14 -0600, Joseph Huber
>> <huber.joseph@comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>>> On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:09:29 -0600, Paul Miner
>>> <pminer@elrancho.invalid> wrote:
>>>> Yes, but only if you use the Sprint Connection Manager. The
>>>> functionality exists there, not in the phone or data card itself.
>>>
>>> What exactly is the Sprint Connection Manager doing? Is it somehow
>>> emulating a modem?
>>
>> Yes and no. It does a simple Area Code lookup before opening a
>> standard Telnet connection (via the Vision network) to a modem bank
>> located as close as possible to your called party, then sends standard
>> Hayes commands over the Telnet connection to control the 56k modem
>> located there. Beyond the Telnet connection, the rest of the call is
>> via the PSTN.
>>
>
>Thanks for that overview, Paul. Someone recently (quasi-)indicated it
>was as simple as using DUN. I had thought it wasn't possible without
>using CM, but wasn't sure. Now I am. (And I didn't have to waste .39
>trying to find out. <g>)

Right, DUN won't know how to do the Area Code lookup or set up the
Telnet connection, etc. This whole thing seems to be one of the better
kept secrets. <g> Not that it has all that much value to the casual
user, of course.
!