Sprint PCS Vision added to Open Relay DataBase

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

First thing Monday morning I started noticing a lot of email I was
sending to my customers was bouncing back. I use a PCMCIA card with the
PCS Vision service from Sprint <http://tinyurl.com/4ggj7>.

It seems that Sprint has been added to the Open Relay DataBase
<www.ordb.org> by mistake somehow. Sprint has no idea how this
happened, and they can't tell me when this will be resolved.

Has anyone here had this happen to their ISP? How long did it take to
get it resolved?


Eric Friedebach
/An Apollo Sandwich from Corky & Lenny's/
5 answers Last reply
More about sprint vision added open relay database
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Eric Friedebach wrote:
    > First thing Monday morning I started noticing a lot of email I was
    > sending to my customers was bouncing back. I use a PCMCIA card with the
    > PCS Vision service from Sprint <http://tinyurl.com/4ggj7>.
    >
    > It seems that Sprint has been added to the Open Relay DataBase
    > <www.ordb.org> by mistake somehow. Sprint has no idea how this
    > happened, and they can't tell me when this will be resolved.

    There are a couple badly run blacklists out there, but the competent ones will
    delist if a listing is in error. Of course, there is no way to tell for sure
    whether it was a mistake, and if it wasn't, Sprint needs to fix their open relay.

    > Has anyone here had this happen to their ISP? How long did it take to
    > get it resolved?

    I'd imagine it depends. To get the right person at Sprint PCS to look at this
    problem might be difficult, since... how do you know who the right person is?
    (Sprint's a huge company.)

    If you forward some details to me (especially anything involving bounce
    messages), I may be able to find someone who can help.

    > Eric Friedebach
    > /An Apollo Sandwich from Corky & Lenny's/

    From Cleveland, eh? Corky & Lenny's rocks out loud :)

    --
    JustThe.net - Apple Valley, CA - http://JustThe.net/ - 888.480.4NET (4638)
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / sjsobol@JustThe.net / PGP: 0xE3AE35ED

    "The wisdom of a fool won't set you free"
    --New Order, "Bizarre Love Triangle"
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 16:21:51 -0800, Eric Friedebach wrote:

    > First thing Monday morning I started noticing a lot of email I was
    > sending to my customers was bouncing back. I use a PCMCIA card with the
    > PCS Vision service from Sprint <http://tinyurl.com/4ggj7>.
    >
    > It seems that Sprint has been added to the Open Relay DataBase
    > <www.ordb.org> by mistake somehow. Sprint has no idea how this
    > happened, and they can't tell me when this will be resolved.
    >
    > Has anyone here had this happen to their ISP? How long did it take to
    > get it resolved?
    >
    >
    > Eric Friedebach
    > /An Apollo Sandwich from Corky & Lenny's/

    Last time(it has been awhile and I use encrypted mail connections to my
    remote smtp servers anyway) I checked sprintpcs allowed port 25 (smtp)
    incoming so all it would take is for one user to get on with an open relay
    to get an ip/netblock to get an rbl entry. I'm surprised sprintpcs was not
    on the list anyway since their ip blocks are dynamic allocations which
    a lot of providers, such as aol for example, will block incoming mail from
    since dynamic ip ranges should never be running servers (They tend to be
    dial-up/residential cable or dsl) and being they they are largely
    residential/consumer they tend to have little to no security patches which
    make them make good spam relay bots. Keep in mind that the dynamic blocks
    I am referring to are specifically set for non-business use by the isp and
    given to dyn rbl setups for that purpose. You shouldn't be sending mail to
    servers directly from your sprintpcs data connection but through a mail
    server setup either at your isp (some allow remote smtp auth) or through
    your business' smtp servers. As far as getting removed it usually involves
    contacting the list then having them retest a few times and if they feel
    like removing you they just might do it if you are extra nice. Remember
    these rbl setups have no obligation to remove anyone and by no means
    guarantee that their lists are accurate. Best method to avoid trouble
    with them is to take steps to never get on them. Sadly since spammers like
    to use various setups that give them a lot of ips to jump around on these
    rbl setups give up blocking individual addresses and block a whole range
    of ips so if you end up in a /24 or even a /16 with some really bad
    spammers that your isp continues to do nothing about you may find
    yourself on the block list.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Well, it looks like enough people raised hell to get this resolved.
    Everything is back to normal as of this afternoon, or at least from
    what I can see.

    Now why would anyone be mad enough at Sprint to falsely submit them as
    an open relay?

    Thanks for your help!


    Eric Friedebach
    /An Apollo Sandwich from Corky & Lenny's/
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Eric Friedebach wrote:
    > Well, it looks like enough people raised hell to get this resolved.
    > Everything is back to normal as of this afternoon, or at least from
    > what I can see.
    >
    > Now why would anyone be mad enough at Sprint to falsely submit them as
    > an open relay?

    Assuming that it was an incorrect listing... well, mistakes happen.

    Usually, you submit an IP address and it goes through one or more
    automated tests. The tests aren't always infallible.

    --
    JustThe.net - Apple Valley, CA - http://JustThe.net/ - 888.480.4NET (4638)
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / sjsobol@JustThe.net / PGP: 0xE3AE35ED

    "The wisdom of a fool won't set you free"
    --New Order, "Bizarre Love Triangle"
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 17:10:23 -0800, Eric Friedebach wrote:

    > Well, it looks like enough people raised hell to get this resolved.
    > Everything is back to normal as of this afternoon, or at least from
    > what I can see.
    >
    > Now why would anyone be mad enough at Sprint to falsely submit them as
    > an open relay?
    >
    > Thanks for your help!
    >
    >
    > Eric Friedebach
    > /An Apollo Sandwich from Corky & Lenny's/

    I highly doubt it was an incorrect listing, as others have said they do
    automated tests. Usually what happens is someone gets a spam email which
    lists an smtp relay that isn't in a block list they then submit it to
    various anti-spam groups/p2p reporting networks. Some groups wait till
    they see multiple complaints others act on the first email and begin the
    testing/confirmation process. The process tends to be finding out who the
    is owner and warning them about being added(not all groups do this but the
    major ones usually do) followed by a confirmation that the site is an open
    relay or a legit mail server who's customers are exploiting their account.

    After all of this they add the ip/block to the list and if the isp/owner
    does not answer emails the entry just stays on the blacklist until the
    owner wakes up and contacts the blacklist operator for removal
    instructions. Believe it or not but customer outcry is how these spam
    blacklists work. The idea is they block your business model until you
    decide you have no choice but to listen to their demands and since they do
    not force anyone to follow their lists it is not illegal for them to do
    this. After all they are only reporting what they have seen to be true and
    are not attacking your business directly.

    If you really want to see how business/hosting providers can get hurt by
    over zealous blacklist operators do a search on spamhaus they are a well
    known anti-spam group that has no problem blocking entire net blocks of a
    specific company and even the net blocks surrounding the ip that the
    spammer was on. They have also been well known for being near impossible
    to get off their list but I do believe that has changed and that they do
    put more effort into working with companies, after they have been added,
    to come to terms for removal. If you don't agree to their terms for
    being de-listed you never will.
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