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Win 7 Home 32bit or 64bit?

Tags:
  • Configuration
  • New Build
  • Windows XP
  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 7
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June 26, 2012 12:05:02 AM

Hello,
I am in the process of shopping for a new build myself PC. My old PC has Windows XP and I figured it maybe time to upgrade to Win 7. I notice there are 32bit and 64bit versions. I will be getting an AMD A4 or A6 processor and wondering if they are 64bit?

More about : win home 32bit 64bit

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June 26, 2012 12:08:56 AM

It is safe to assume that any new CPU is 64bit compatible. Get the 64bit version and get at least 8GB of RAM with your new PC.
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June 26, 2012 12:11:38 AM

You can buy 32 bit. The license will also be valid for 64 bit if you want to test that later
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June 26, 2012 12:14:42 AM

Oh yeah the CPUs are 64 bit compatible
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June 26, 2012 12:17:22 AM

And yeah if you choose 64 bit, there is no theoretical limit to the amount of RAM you can install (it depends on how much your MOBO will allow). You should ask yourself how much you need and buy install that amount of RAM.
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a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2012 12:31:21 AM

I'm disagreeing about the RAM. Unless you're doing heavy gaming, which I'm doubting based off the CPU, 4GB is enough for everyday tasks - email, web, Office, etc.
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June 26, 2012 12:50:18 AM

unless you have to decide now, I'd wait til windows 8 gets released in a couple of months and either see how many bugs it has or get the windows 7 at a discounted price.
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a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2012 12:51:01 AM

You should install Windows 7 32 bit if your computer has 3 Gig or of less memory and you have no intention of upgrading the amount of memory or if there is a must have driver or application that will not work with 64 bit Windows. In all other cases install 64 bit Windows
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June 26, 2012 1:30:06 AM

If you weren't going to upgrade your hardware I'd say 32bit. But if you are going to get a new cpu / memory just go for 64bit. Yes you can upgrade, but why go through all the potential hassle when you can just do it the 1st time.

4GB of memory is enough if your just going to be doing office/web surfing, but given the prices of memory just get a 6 or 8 GB kit. 8 GB may not help now, but in 3+ years if you still have the system you may be using more than 4GB.

I guess it comes down to how long you expect to use the machine. If your the type of person who replaces the system every year or so, then 32bit Win7 may be the way to go now and your next system could be 64bit Win8. If you tend to keep upgrading or just delay as long as you can, you should be looking at what you'll need in 2 or 3 years.
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June 26, 2012 2:13:41 AM

Extremely bad advice all throughout this thread.

Get 64-bit period. The benefits are more then just more memory. NTx64 kernel is more secure due to a different architecture, its more efficient and stable.

For the quantity of memory, most people would be satisfied with 4GB. 8GB is cheap though, effective for when your multitasking and Windows 7 actually has decent caching mechanisms so excess memory will be used to make your system run smoother.

There is absolutely ZERO excuse for people to still be using a 32-bit OS for their primary computer.
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June 26, 2012 8:45:09 AM

palladin9479 said:
Extremely bad advice all throughout this thread.

Get 64-bit period. The benefits are more then just more memory. NTx64 kernel is more secure due to a different architecture, its more efficient and stable.

For the quantity of memory, most people would be satisfied with 4GB. 8GB is cheap though, effective for when your multitasking and Windows 7 actually has decent caching mechanisms so excess memory will be used to make your system run smoother.

There is absolutely ZERO excuse for people to still be using a 32-bit OS for their primary computer.


ZERO is incorrect. On a new system it's 64bit without a doubt. On an existing system a 32bit OS may be needed if the computer has components that are not Win7-64 compatible. Now that may rule out all versions of Win 7 or even VISTA if it's a fairly old system. I've seen printers, scanners, video capture, tape drives and other bits that run under XP (maybe VISTA 32 with a lot of persuasion) but just will not play with Win 7. I can't say I've seen much software/hardware that works on Win 7-32 (in compatibility mode) but not Win7-64 though, except for some very old software that may still have 16bit or DOS/Win9x code. This type of software/hardware is probably not on your primary system, but was on mine. And Yes there are DosBox and other emulators but they have their limits.


For the OP though, Pally is correct on everything else. Win7-64 is more secure and in theory more stable (never had an issue with Win7-32 or 64) than it's 32bit version. Just get >4GB if you can afford it, or get 4GB in the least number of stick you can and have the option to upgrade to 8GB when you have the money. Memory is just so cheap it doesn't make sense to shortchange your system (if you go 64bit).
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June 26, 2012 9:06:46 AM

QEFX said:
ZERO is incorrect. On a new system it's 64bit without a doubt. On an existing system a 32bit OS may be needed if the computer has components that are not Win7-64 compatible. Now that may rule out all versions of Win 7 or even VISTA if it's a fairly old system. I've seen printers, scanners, video capture, tape drives and other bits that run under XP (maybe VISTA 32 with a lot of persuasion) but just will not play with Win 7. I can't say I've seen much software/hardware that works on Win 7-32 (in compatibility mode) but not Win7-64 though, except for some very old software that may still have 16bit or DOS/Win9x code. This type of software/hardware is probably not on your primary system, but was on mine. And Yes there are DosBox and other emulators but they have their limits.


For the OP though, Pally is correct on everything else. Win7-64 is more secure and in theory more stable (never had an issue with Win7-32 or 64) than it's 32bit version. Just get >4GB if you can afford it, or get 4GB in the least number of stick you can and have the option to upgrade to 8GB when you have the money. Memory is just so cheap it doesn't make sense to shortchange your system (if you go 64bit).


All Windows 7 drivers are 64-bit compatible. A requirement for Microsoft to issue WHQL certification from Vista onward is that all drivers have a 64-bit version.

I'm discussing anything new, seeing as the last Pentium IV's had 64-bit compatibility we can assume that any system made in the last 5~6 years will be capable of running a 64-bit OS.

Hardware compatibility was an issue with Windows XP x64, we've already crossed that hill. The most you have to worry about are extremely old USB Printers / Camera's and Scanners that never got WHQL certification. Considering how cheap those are in general (outside of a few professional models) and the advancement in technology, purchasing new shouldn't be an issue.

System stability has to do with NTx64 (so Windows XP x64 and beyond) kernel and how it segments applications. Applications can never write into kernel memory nor into each others memory. Therefor an application can never cause NTx64 to crash or hang. Any stability problems must start in a kernel mode driver, thus Microsoft's strict WHQL requirements now.
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June 26, 2012 10:01:23 AM

x64 is all the way if you have 4GB of rams or more
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July 3, 2012 2:28:52 AM

Thanks for all your answers. I figured it out and I purchased Windows 7 Pro 64bit. My processor is AMD A6-3650 (supports 64bit) and I will be installing 8Gb (2x4) of Cruical DDR3 1600 RAM. So plenty of RAM for what I'm running. Cheers, Tucats
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July 3, 2012 2:30:14 AM

Best answer selected by Tucats.
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