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PC to PC audio transfer

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Anonymous
April 1, 2005 3:01:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I plan to split my PC recording setup into two PCs. I would then need a
way to send audio from one pc (instruments and gigastudio) to the the
other (recording). I don't need analog and don't necessarily need build
on effects. What are some of the *affordable* ways to do this without
sacrificing quality?

Do I need to buy two PCI interfaces, or is there some kind of audio
router on the market?

~ Lauren

More about : audio transfer

Anonymous
April 1, 2005 3:10:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

You need to be a little bit more specific about it. Do you want your
recording PC to 'see' or 'hear' the other one?

Evangelos

%
Evangelos Himonides
IoE, University of London
tel: +44 2076126599
fax: +44 2076126741
"Allas to those who never sing but die with all their music in them..."



Oliver Wendell Holmes


%
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 3:21:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I am looking to record the output of one PC onto another PC.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 3:37:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Clearer, but still laconic! What I mean is that with certain setups you
might be able to control the parameters of the sound generation machine
(parameters of your plugins and your virtual sampler) from the actual
recording machine and use it as a slave to the main recording
workstation.
If you just want to use the 'plugin' machine as a 'line-out' device (as
if it was a sound module or a synthesizer) then just send the line out
of the soundcard to the line in of the soundcard of the machine that
you're planning to use for recording.
Again, many possibilities and discussions:
1. Do you want to do this in real-time?
2. Do you want to do this with a single stereo mix or with different
channels?; which leads to
3. What type of soundcards do you have installed in machines nr. 1 and
nr. 2
4. What kind of software are you using for recording? for example, if
you're using Cubase SX you can take advantage of "VST System Link" and
connect the 2 machines via ethernet.
The list can go on for miles...

Regards,

Evangelos
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 3:46:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I appologise for being vague and unclear.

My primary PC functions as a multi-track recorder. I'm using a Luna II
for recording and playback of MIDI and Audio. Also installed on this PC
is a soundBlaster card that I use only for MIDI. I have three sound
sources which are 2 external synths and GigaStrudio.

What I want to do is create a new PC that functions as a stand-alone
sound module. This will replace the GigaStudio functionality in the
primary PC. Installed on this new PC will be GigaStudio and a few
virtual synths, but no recording software. I plan to use some
MIDI-over-LAN product to send MIDI to the "sound module" PC. But now
I'm left with the task of getting the live audio into the recording PC
for recording.

Regards,
~ Lauren
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 3:56:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Lauren the Ravishing" <lauren_the_ravishing@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1112384771.090243.201260@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>I appologise for being vague and unclear.
>
> My primary PC functions as a multi-track recorder. I'm using a Luna II
> for recording and playback of MIDI and Audio. Also installed on this PC
> is a soundBlaster card that I use only for MIDI. I have three sound
> sources which are 2 external synths and GigaStrudio.
>
> What I want to do is create a new PC that functions as a stand-alone
> sound module. This will replace the GigaStudio functionality in the
> primary PC. Installed on this new PC will be GigaStudio and a few
> virtual synths, but no recording software. I plan to use some
> MIDI-over-LAN product to send MIDI to the "sound module" PC. But now
> I'm left with the task of getting the live audio into the recording PC
> for recording.
>
> Regards,
> ~ Lauren
>

Hi Lauren,

I would think the easiest way would be to record the audio coming from the
PC using an A/D interface. Do you only need a stereo channel or
multichannel? I know you said you don't do any analog. What software do you
use? Cubase and maybe Nuendo have some sort of system link that is supposed
to allow multiple computers to be used as one system but I don't know if it
would be what you need or not.

If you have a spare pile of cash it might me more efficient to just build a
new PC that can handle all of the applications at one.

Best of luck!

--
John L Rice
Drummer@ImJohn.com
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 3:57:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Also:

What's missing in my design is the hardware for both PCs that transfers
the live audio from one PC to another. I'm willing to replace the Luna
II with something that lets me get a live digial signal from my sound
module PC. I would prefer to transfer multiple channels of audio at
once. I assume that I will need to buy two sound cards, one for each
PC, such as RME Hammerfalls.

I know that midi-over-lan exists. Does audio over lan exist? Can I
connect each PC via firewire and get live audio?

My recording PC runs Sonar 3. My main sound source is GigaStudio and
secondarily my sound modules (Kurzweil K2500X and Roland XV-5080).

I hope I'm making more sense.
~ Lauren
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 6:22:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I don't completely understand what you're trying to accomplish here (you
may want to share some more details about how you plan to set things up).
One quick idea that came to mind was to set the two computers up on a
network using FireWire. Install a FireWire (IEEE 1394) card in each
computer, run the Home or Small Office Network Setup Wizard, turn on file
sharing (right-click on the folder containing the audio and choose Sharing
and Security), and you should be good to go, if I understand what you're
trying to accomplish.
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 8:56:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

How many channels do you need? A soundcards with SPDIF ins and outs in
each computer would work fine if you are only going to move two
channels at a time. Or two cards with ADAT light-pipe ins and outs
would work if more channels are needed. Check out some of the RME
audio products.

Al

On 1 Apr 2005 11:01:43 -0800, "Lauren the Ravishing"
<lauren_the_ravishing@yahoo.com> wrote:

>I plan to split my PC recording setup into two PCs. I would then need a
>way to send audio from one pc (instruments and gigastudio) to the the
>other (recording). I don't need analog and don't necessarily need build
>on effects. What are some of the *affordable* ways to do this without
>sacrificing quality?
>
>Do I need to buy two PCI interfaces, or is there some kind of audio
>router on the market?
>
>~ Lauren
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 10:23:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1112384771.090243.201260@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com> lauren_the_ravishing@yahoo.com writes:

> What I want to do is create a new PC that functions as a stand-alone
> sound module. This will replace the GigaStudio functionality in the
> primary PC. Installed on this new PC will be GigaStudio and a few
> virtual synths, but no recording software. I plan to use some
> MIDI-over-LAN product to send MIDI to the "sound module" PC. But now
> I'm left with the task of getting the live audio into the recording PC
> for recording.

I'd suggest using "MIDI-over-MIDI" technology rather than fooling with
a LAN. MIDI interfaces are mighty cheap. As far as getting live audio
from one machine to the other, analog out to analog in is good if your
sound cards are up to it. Or you could use sound cards that have
digital inputs and outputs and save a D/A and A/D conversion.

It's simple, and not very expensive. Don't try to make it complicated.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 12:03:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Lauren the Ravishing" <lauren_the_ravishing@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1112382103.315260.226860@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> I plan to split my PC recording setup into two PCs. I would then need a
> way to send audio from one pc (instruments and gigastudio) to the the
> other (recording). I don't need analog and don't necessarily need build
> on effects. What are some of the *affordable* ways to do this without
> sacrificing quality?
>
> Do I need to buy two PCI interfaces, or is there some kind of audio
> router on the market?
>

If you want to send audio in 'real time', you'll need some kind of card or
interface for both DAWs. E-mu has some less-expensive cards on the market
that have an ADAT port. You'll need an ADAT on the other DAW as well.

jb
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 2:56:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Lauren,

> I plan to split my PC recording setup into two PCs. I would then need a
way to send audio from one pc (instruments and gigastudio) to the other
(recording). <

For all the expense and hassle to do what you're asking, you'd probably be
better off just buying a single more powerful PC.

--Ethan
April 4, 2005 8:47:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"I am looking to record the output of one PC onto another PC."

A simple USB-to-USB connection between the computers, using a Radio
Shack USB coupler between the two cables, will allow you to do a lot of
this kind of thing because the master computer can then address the
slave computer as a system device.

Of course, don't overlook the a simple keychain USB memory drive as a
quick and dirty way of transferring files between the computers.
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 12:58:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bill" <bcrowell@excite.com> wrote in message
news:1112615267.042479.90250@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com
> "I am looking to record the output of one PC onto another PC."
>
> A simple USB-to-USB connection between the computers, using a Radio
> Shack USB coupler between the two cables, will allow you to do a lot
> of this kind of thing because the master computer can then address
the
> slave computer as a system device.
>
> Of course, don't overlook the a simple keychain USB memory drive as
a
> quick and dirty way of transferring files between the computers.

Now that these puppies are well under $100 in gigabyte sizes, they can
handle all but the largest audio project files.
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 4:53:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1112615267.042479.90250@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> bcrowell@excite.com writes:

> A simple USB-to-USB connection between the computers, using a Radio
> Shack USB coupler between the two cables, will allow you to do a lot of
> this kind of thing because the master computer can then address the
> slave computer as a system device.

How do you tell the "slave" computer to look like a USB mass storage
device?

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 4:53:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <waydnbPL8rd3pMzfRVn-uA@comcast.com> arnyk@hotpop.com writes:

> > Of course, don't overlook the a simple keychain USB memory drive as
> a quick and dirty way of transferring files between the computers.
>
> Now that these puppies are well under $100 in gigabyte sizes, they can
> handle all but the largest audio project files.

Yeah, but CDs cost a dime, handle at least half that much data, and
you have a copy that you can afford to keep on the shelf for
emergencies.

I've put most of the miles on my 128 MB memory stick ($15 after
rebates) at technical group meetings so we can pass files around
without e-mailing them.

For two computers, though, assuming they were modern enough to include
a network card in each and a new enough operating system so that
peer-to-peer networking was trivial, I'd just hook 'em up with an
Ethernet cable and use the standard networking tools.

But I may have lost track of the original question.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 7:35:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 4 Apr 2005 04:47:47 -0700, "Bill" <bcrowell@excite.com> wrote:

>
>A simple USB-to-USB connection between the computers, using a Radio
>Shack USB coupler between the two cables, will allow you to do a lot of
>this kind of thing because the master computer can then address the
>slave computer as a system device.
>
>Of course, don't overlook the a simple keychain USB memory drive as a
>quick and dirty way of transferring files between the computers.

Why not a standard network? Cards may already be installed. If not,
they cost (almost) pennies.
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 8:28:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> In article <waydnbPL8rd3pMzfRVn-uA@comcast.com> arnyk@hotpop.com
> writes:
>
>>> Of course, don't overlook the a simple keychain USB memory drive
as
>> a quick and dirty way of transferring files between the computers.
>>
>> Now that these puppies are well under $100 in gigabyte sizes, they
>> can handle all but the largest audio project files.

> Yeah, but CDs cost a dime, handle at least half that much data, and
> you have a copy that you can afford to keep on the shelf for
> emergencies.

CDs aren't as big as a gigabyte.
They take a while to write.
They don't carry as well.

> I've put most of the miles on my 128 MB memory stick ($15 after
> rebates) at technical group meetings so we can pass files around
> without e-mailing them.

I use mine to carry a bunch of files related to computer
trouble-shooting and trouble-fixing.

> For two computers, though, assuming they were modern enough to
include
> a network card in each and a new enough operating system so that
> peer-to-peer networking was trivial, I'd just hook 'em up with an
> Ethernet cable and use the standard networking tools.

Can't find a wire long enough in most cases.

> But I may have lost track of the original question.
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 11:19:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:7bCdndNmEazGPszfRVn-iw@comcast.com...
> Mike Rivers wrote:
> > In article <waydnbPL8rd3pMzfRVn-uA@comcast.com> arnyk@hotpop.com

> > For two computers, though, assuming they were modern enough to
> include
> > a network card in each and a new enough operating system so that
> > peer-to-peer networking was trivial, I'd just hook 'em up with an
> > Ethernet cable and use the standard networking tools.
>
> Can't find a wire long enough in most cases.

How long of a crossover do you need?

jb
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 12:18:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

reddred wrote:
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:7bCdndNmEazGPszfRVn-iw@comcast.com...
>> Mike Rivers wrote:

>

>>> In article <waydnbPL8rd3pMzfRVn-uA@comcast.com> arnyk@hotpop.com

>>>> Of course, don't overlook the a simple keychain USB memory drive

>>> For two computers, though, assuming they were modern enough to
>>> include a network card in each and a new enough operating system
so
>>> that peer-to-peer networking was trivial, I'd just hook 'em up
with
>>> an Ethernet cable and use the standard networking tools.

>> Can't find a wire long enough in most cases.

> How long of a crossover do you need?

In the case of USB keychain memoyr drives, the computers being
interfaced are often dozens or even 100's of miles apart.
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 4:40:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> In article <1112615267.042479.90250@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> bcrowell@excite.com writes:
>
>
>>A simple USB-to-USB connection between the computers, using a Radio
>>Shack USB coupler between the two cables, will allow you to do a lot of
>>this kind of thing because the master computer can then address the
>>slave computer as a system device.
>
>
> How do you tell the "slave" computer to look like a USB mass storage
> device?


Use Firewire instead and hold down the T key while it boots. ;) 
April 5, 2005 8:34:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I use Adobe Audition. I would either tell Audition to "save the
waveform as" and then choose "browse", and then navigate to the folder
on the remote computer where I want to save the session; and/or

I would tell Audition to save its temporary files in the desired folder
on the remote computer.

> How do you tell the "slave" computer to look like a USB mass storage
> device?
>
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 1:32:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <xL2dnXLPnrx33c_fRVn-ug@omsoft.com> nopsam@nospam.net writes:

> > How do you tell the "slave" computer to look like a USB mass storage
> > device?

> Use Firewire instead and hold down the T key while it boots. ;) 

Sorry, but I'm dense when it comes to much more than turning on a
computer. Is this a joke [I noticed the ";)"] that actually does
something on a PC, or is that the way you put the computer in a mode
where it indeed looks like a disk drive?

Or is this how you enable networking through Firewire, something which
I tricked the computer into not installing when I was fooling with
Firewire PCMCIA cards because I thought it was interfering with my
Firewire transfers.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 1:32:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> In article <xL2dnXLPnrx33c_fRVn-ug@omsoft.com> nopsam@nospam.net writes:
>
>
>>>How do you tell the "slave" computer to look like a USB mass storage
>>>device?
>
>
>>Use Firewire instead and hold down the T key while it boots. ;) 
>
>
> Sorry, but I'm dense when it comes to much more than turning on a
> computer. Is this a joke [I noticed the ";)"] that actually does
> something on a PC, or is that the way you put the computer in a mode
> where it indeed looks like a disk drive?



Sorry, it's a thing Macs do; I couldn't resist the temptation. The
machine with the T key turns into an external disk drive to the other
machine, instead of actually booting.
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 7:34:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <QJ-dncz-0eAxN8_fRVn-uA@omsoft.com> nopsam@nospam.net writes:

> >>Use Firewire instead and hold down the T key while it boots. ;) 

> Sorry, it's a thing Macs do; I couldn't resist the temptation. The
> machine with the T key turns into an external disk drive to the other
> machine, instead of actually booting.

Pretty clever, actually. Thanks for the explanation, even though it
won't work on any of my computers.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 6, 2005 3:38:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:0NSdnYgMV6D_RMzfRVn-tA@comcast.com...
> reddred wrote:
> > "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> > news:7bCdndNmEazGPszfRVn-iw@comcast.com...

> > How long of a crossover do you need?
>
> In the case of USB keychain memoyr drives, the computers being
> interfaced are often dozens or even 100's of miles apart.
>

I see. Another generation or two and they'll be substantial enough for audio
use as well.

jb
Anonymous
April 7, 2005 2:00:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

reddred wrote:
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:0NSdnYgMV6D_RMzfRVn-tA@comcast.com...
>> reddred wrote:
>>> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
>>> news:7bCdndNmEazGPszfRVn-iw@comcast.com...
>
>>> How long of a crossover do you need?
>>
>> In the case of USB keychain memoyr drives, the computers being
>> interfaced are often dozens or even 100's of miles apart.
>>
>
> I see. Another generation or two and they'll be substantial enough
> for audio use as well.

At 1 GB for less than $100, they are already there for small projects.
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 12:35:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message news:kLSdnTy_z5l-
>> I see. Another generation or two and they'll be substantial enough
>> for audio use as well.
>
> At 1 GB for less than $100, they are already there for small projects.

And you don't get funny looks when you have one in your pocket.

And they don't stopped working when they are dropped like a Jaz disk, which
was once the only option for convenient audio transfer between sites. Mind
you, Jaz diss don't even need to be dropped to just stop working....

geoff
Anonymous
April 8, 2005 1:25:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Geoff Wood wrote:
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message news:kLSdnTy_z5l-
>>> I see. Another generation or two and they'll be substantial enough
>>> for audio use as well.
>>
>> At 1 GB for less than $100, they are already there for small
>> projects.

> And you don't get funny looks when you have one in your pocket.

If anybody even notices.

> And they don't stopped working when they are dropped like a Jaz
disk,
> which was once the only option for convenient audio transfer between
> sites. Mind you, Jaz diss don't even need to be dropped to just
stop
> working....

Yup. If you haven't already done so, sell your Iomega stock. Stick a
fork in them, they are done!
!